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Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:09 pm

“Truck” carrying story on Yazidi refugee arrives at Fajr

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Kambuzia Partovi, director of the acclaimed drama “Café Transit”, is competing in the 36th Fajr Film Festival with his latest movies “Truck” that recounts the story of a Yazidi woman who becomes homeless after the Iraqi ethnic and religious minority is attacked by Daesh forces in the summer of 2014.

“By this film, I intend to say that we could be good supporters for each other during hard times and giving the refugees shelter could be viewed as a practice of humanity,” he said in a press conference after a screening of his movie on Friday.

“We still witness everyday people who are losing their lives across the world as they are fleeing their homes under the fire of wars to take refuge in other countries,” he added

Partovi planned to shoot the film in Turkey a few years ago after he failed to receive the then cultural officials’ permission to make it in Iran. The plan was not fulfilled after he could not cover the cost of production.

Composer Milad Movahhedi used a woman singer of Kormanj, a group of Kurdish nomads mostly living in Khorasan Razavi Province and North Khorasan Province, to perform a song for the film.

“This song should have an orchestral ambiance to feature the depth of the grief suffered by the people in the region,” Movahhedi said at the press conference, but the singer was not named.

“I asked the Kurdish singer to improvise about loneliness and homelessness… and the major part of the theme music begins when the Yazidi woman and her family join a trucker on a journey,” he added.

“This song has frequently been redone by many Kurdish singers and is about a woman who is searching everywhere for her missing husband,” he stated and said, “This story is similar to the one that is narrated in the film.”

Photo: Director Kambuzia Partovi (R) and cast members Nasrin Moradi (C) and Saeid Aqakhani pose during a photocall for “Truck” at the Fajr Film Festival in Tehran on February 2, 2018. (Mehr/Mohammadreza Abbasi)

http://www.tehrantimes.com/news/420951/ ... es-at-Fajr
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Feb 04, 2018 4:41 pm

Ezidis demonstrate in Shengal for Afrin

Hundreds of Ezidis carried out a demonstration of solidarity with Afrin in Shengal. On Sunday, a group from Shengal will head for Afrin.

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The protests against the attack of Turkish forces and militia under Turkish command on Afrin are widening. On Saturday, a demonstration took place in Shengal, attended by many women and children. It was the largest demonstration ever held in Shengal.

The crowd carried banners of the Shengal Democratic Autonomous Assembly, Freedom and Democracy Party of Êzidîs PADÊ), Free Ezidi Women’s Movement TAJÊ and Ezidi Youth’s Union YCÊ. In addition, pictures of Abdullah Öcalan and olive branches as a symbol of Afrin were carried.

At the closing rally, Neam Elyas on behalf of the TAJÊ said the attack on Afrin recalled the ISIS attack on Shengal on 3 August 2014.

At the end of the protest, a march to Afrin was announced for Sunday.
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:04 pm

Yazidi woman kidnapped and raped blasts ISIS fighter
By Natalie Corner

    Shireen a Yazidi woman was kept as a sex slave when she was captured by ISIS

    As part of a BBC show she revisits the Mosul house where she was held

    The Yazidi woman reveals she attempted suicide four times to escape

    Shireen meets an ISIS fighter who had three of his own sex slaves

    He is challenged over why he joined ISIS to which he reveals it was for money

    He also admits to raping 250 women and children, and killing 900 people

A Yazidi woman who was kidnapped by ISIS and sold as a sex slave has come face-to-face with a jihadist who took part in a raid on her home town of Sinjar.

Shireen, who was raped repeatedly by her captor Saif, retraced her steps to the Iraqi city of Mosul where she was held for two-and-a-half years, as part of a new BBC Three documentary fronted by Stacey Dooley called Face To Face With ISIS.

There she comes face-to-face with an ISIS fighter named Anmar - who took part on the raid of Shireen's home city and had three sex slaves of his own.

He revealed how he had raped more than 250 women and children - some as young as 15, adding that it was a 'very strong' desire that he was unable to control.

Horrified, Shireen tells him: 'You will pay for the tears of these girls.'

Anmar faces Stacey and Shireen's questions as he admits to killing 900 people and raping 250 women

During the programme, Shireen reveals her ordeal was so horrific she attempted suicide four times, before she managed to escape her living hell during the battle to regain the city in which her captor, Saif, was killed.

Shireen said: 'I lost hope to die, they wouldn’t let us kill ourselves. I tried four times.

'Saif would frighten and kill people. I’d rather have died than what go through what happened.'

At the end of their journey in Iraq, Stacey and Shireen challenge Anmar on why he joined the terrorist organisation to which he reveals it was for the money - before admitting he had killed 900 people during the reign of terror.

Stacey was left appalled when she questioned how many women and children Anmar raped during his time as a member of ISIS before he was arrested.

'During the time I was with them the 15 to 16 year olds maybe about 50 and the older ones, [I raped] over 200.'

'When it comes to having sex, no one can control it, it’s a very strong desire,' Anmar said.

'Even if she was trying to stop me, you know… But when I finished with her and saw her crying my heart would break for her.'

Shireen told him: 'If you had a good heart you wouldn’t take three girls and rape them on a daily basis. You enjoyed this.'

Admitting that he did, he then claimed: 'At the time it was different, I was put under pressure. I was required to do this.

The plight of the Yazidi women: What is happening to the ethnic Kurdish group under ISIS's control?

The Kurdish ethnic group, the Yazidis, have suffered massacres and oppression for generations and the Kurdistan region in northern Iraq has been under siege from ISIS since 2014.

Amal Clooney has campaigned for justice for the Yazidi women in Iraq

The UN has declared the killing of the Yazidi people by ISIS as genocide and human rights lawyer Amal Clooney has been a constant campaigner for justice for the Yazidi women, many of whom have been raped by ISIS fighters.

Clooney said testimonies from young women and girls were among the most harrowing 'she'd ever heard'.

The Yazidis came under attack in August 2014 when Islamic State fighters rounded up men, women and children in northern Iraq, saying they’d be killed if they didn’t convert to Islam.

The Yazidis - a minority Kurdish group in Iraq - follow an ancient pre-Islamic faith.

The men were taken away and many were slaughtered. Some 7,000 Yazidi women and girls were forced into sexual slavery when the militia took over the community’s heartland in Sinjar, northern Iraq, and slaughtered 5,000 people.

Mass graves have been discovered across the country including one in Mosul that contained 4,000 bodies.

'If I didn’t kill my commander would be ready with his weapon behind me to kill me.'

But an emotional Shireen snapped: 'You will pay for the tears of these girls. This is the price for their deaths.'

Anmar agreed that was the least he should expect: 'I’m waiting for my fate, my fate is death.'

The terrorist, who arrived to the meeting in the back of a van with a hood over his face and shackled in chains, said he joined ISIS because he was poor.

'It was about money for me.'

He also revealed the tactics ISIS used to lure people to their death.

'With my hands the number of people I killed and slaughtered would be about 900 people, something like that.

'We would put up fake security checkpoints, as if we were police. We’d get 30, 40 people in a truck. We’d finish them and kill them.'

During their trip to Iraq, Shireen takes Stacey to one of the former markets that were set up to trade the women.

She explains that 100 women were sold at a time and more than 3,000 people are still missing, most likely in Syria.

Shireen she is still haunted by not knowing what happened to her sister who was taken at the beginning, and her father who also disappeared.

'Not knowing their fate is more painful than knowing that they are dead,' she told Stacey.

The pair are escorted by an Iraqi Comander as they search through the decimated city to locate Shireen’s escape house.

But when she begins to open up about her time with her captor Saif, she is cut off from answering Stacey’s questions about her experience by the Commander.

'Truly I would have rather have died than what happened here, but through this we want to tell the world, what happened here…' she began.

It's a culturally sensitive topic in Iraq, and Stacey explained that for the Commander who lost many men fighting ISIS to lead the women to safety, her words were too much.

Furious he attempted to shut the filming down: 'She is an Iraqi woman, an Iraqi woman. Any embarrassment for her is my embarrassment. I won’t let anyone insult her Iraqi-ness, insult her Iraqi-ness and her dignity.'

But Shireen, who now lives in a camp for refugees from the Mount Sinjar attack where her people were murdered and the women sold into slavery, said she won't be silenced any longer: 'I was the luckiest out of the girls. I was raped less than the others, as I was raped by just one person.

'They should get the ultimate punishment,' she added.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... ghter.html
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:24 pm

'They should get the ultimate punishment,' she added.

An almost painless execution is not an appropriate punishment for all that man has done X(

In a book I am reading someone was punished for sexual crimes by being stripped naked and having meat juice poured onto his penis and other parts

Then the dogs were let out :ymdevil:

He did not die but lived in pain, without a penis and a few other parts :ymapplause:

I have always believed the best way to stop jihadists was to cut their penises off and feed them to pigs - that way they would know they would NOT enter heaven and receive 72 virgins :ymparty:
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:31 pm

Clooneys on sponsoring Yazidi refugee who fled ISIS
By Khaleda Rahman For Dailymail.com

    Hazim Avdal was brought to the United States with the help of the Clooneys

    Adval is now a student at the University of Chicago, the couple have revealed

    They spoke about their decision in an interview with David Letterman for his Netflix show
George and Amal Clooney have revealed how the Yazidi refugee they sponsored after he fled ISIS is going to college in Chicago and living near George's parents.

Hazim Avdal was brought to the United States with the help of the Clooneys, who told David Letterman in an interview for his Netflix show why they decided to help him.

In an interview for the episode, Amal told Letterman that she met Avdal while representing a number of Yazidi refugees in her job as a human rights lawyer.

'I've had the privilege of representing a number of Yazidis, who have been the victims of genocide perpetrated by ISIS over the last couple of years, that's how I met Hazim,' Amal told Letterman.

'When I met him, I remember being so struck by his courage, but also by his amazing spirit, and how he spoke even after everything he'd lost, he spoke about a desire for justice, not revenge.'

She said she and her husband decided to make Avdal's dream of receiving an education in the US a reality when he spoke about it one day while they were all in New York.

'You didn't...give a gratuity': Clooney called out by Letterman

THE PLIGHT OF THE YAZIDIS: THOUSANDS SLAUGHTERED
7,000 TAKEN AS SEX SLAVES BY ISIS IN IRAQ


Yazidis are a religious minority who lived in an uneasy existence with their Muslim neighbors in Iraq and Syria.

Tens of thousands of Yazidis fled the August 2014 massacre in Sinjar by Islamic State militants.

About 7,000 women and girls were captured by the hard-line Sunni Muslim fighters who view Yazidis as devil worshippers.

Yazidi men and older women were killed. The younger women and girls were held in captivity for sex.

The United Nations described the massacres of the Yazidis as genocide with UN investigators estimating that more than 5,000 Yazidis were rounded up and slaughtered in the 2014 attack.

Investigations have documented horrific accounts of abuse suffered by women and girls.

Around 3,000 women are believed to remain in ISIS captivity.

Nadia Murad was abducted at the age of 21 from the village of Kocho near Sinjar, an area home to about 400,000 Yazidis.

She now lives in Germany and told of her experience being beaten and sold as a sex slave by ISIS militants in her book 'The Last Girl.'

To escape, Murad saw a fleeting chance to jump over the garden wall of her captor's house in Mosul.

After wandering the streets cloaked in an abaya, she made a daring decision to knock on the door of a stranger's house and ask for help.

That was a huge risk, and she later learned her niece, also enslaved, had been turned in six times to Islamic State by people she had asked for help.

Murad was lucky that the strangers she found in Mosul helped smuggle her to a refugee camp.

In the book, Murad recounted her life in a northern Iraqi village, her brutal captivity, her tension-filled escape and feelings of betrayal and abandonment by those who failed to help.

Amal Clooney, who represents Murad and wrote the foreword to 'The Last Girl,' is campaigning for ISIS to be prosecuted through the International Criminal Court. In September, the United Nations Security Council approved the creation of an investigative team to collect, preserve and store evidence in Iraq of acts by ISIS.

Letterman visits Avdal in Augusta, Kentucky, in an upcoming episode of his Netflix show

'I know we all had the same thought, which was, 'Well, maybe there's something we can do to help with that.''

It comes after the UN Security Council voted to set up an investigation team to collect evidence on the massacres of Iraq's Yazidi minority and other atrocities committed by ISIS in Iraq.

Britain drafted the resolution to help bring perpetrators of ISIS war crimes to justice - a cause championed by the international human rights lawyer.

Amal, who was present for the vote in September, represents Yazidi women who were taken hostage and used as sex slaves by the terror group as it swept into Iraq's Sinjar region in August 2014.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... fugee.html
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:36 pm

Yazidi girl who escaped ISIS captivity dies of acute heart failure

RIP Shahd

Shahd Khodr Mirza, a Yazidi girl who hails from the town of Tal Banat in Iraq, passed away on Tuesday at 16 years old after being under ISIS captivity for three years.

Shahd died at a hospital in Dahuk in Iraq’s Kurdistan after suffering from acute heart failure which may have resulted from the physical and psychological torture she suffered while being held by ISIS.

Farida Fleit, who works at the NGO Yazda which supports Yazidi minorities, told Al Arabiya that Shahd was continually raped by several ISIS members during her years of captivity.

Quoting Shahd’s 12-year-old brother, Farida said Shahd and her brother, Shaher, were kidnapped in front of their school in Talafar in 2014 by an Iraqi man.

After the man raped and tortured her, Shahd was then “sold” in Syria to an ISIS member named Abu Khalil al-Baghdad. Shaher was separated from his sister and taken to an ISIS camp in Syria.

Shahed and her brother escaped when the man who had bought Shahd, Abu Khalil, was moving them to another area in Syria. During their journey, they passed by a location controlled by Kurdish units where Shaher told Kurdish fighters that Abu Khalil was an ISIS member.

The siblings were then taken to Iraq where they reached the town of Khan Sour on January 5. Shahd was immediately transferred to hospital according to Fleit who was with her three days prior to her death.

The fate of her father, four brothers and two sisters remains unknown as ISIS also kidnapped them on the same day she was abducted.

Shaher is now with his mother and uncle and lives with the hope of learning anything about his father and siblings.

https://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/m ... ilure.html
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:18 am

International Help Needed for the Yazidis
Shivani Ekkanath

SEATTLE — The Yazidi people are a small Kurdish-speaking minority ethnic group residing in northern Iraq with a heritage steeped in a 4,000-year-old faith. Considered by many to be the oldest religion in the world, Yazidism blends elements from pre-Zoroastrian roots, Islam and Christianity as well.

Since the rise of the Islamic State in 2014, there has been a great persecution of minority groups in the region. The battle against the self-declared caliphate reached a height in 2017. Joint U.K. and U.S.-led coalition forces have made great headway in providing aid and liberating large swaths of previously IS-dominated territory. Though not widely known, the threat of mass displacement and the plight of the Yazidis are especially grave concerns. The death toll of this minority group passed 3,100 in 2017, with many individuals still either lost or unaccounted for.

Of the 700,000 Yazidis globally, there are an estimated 600,000 currently living in Iraq. Nearly 85 percent of them are refugees. Unfortunately, they face a long history of oppression in the region, as there are major constraints on their culture, language and practices. The unfortunate plight of the Yazidis is almost akin to a genocide.

Given the scale of the problem, the plight of the Yazidis remains serious. A majority of them are scattered across the Syrian-Iraqi border. The Iraq-Syria border and the cities of Dohuk and Sinjar are at the forefront of the Yazidi problem. Given its proximity to the Iraqi city of Mosul, Sinjar was left defenseless after falling to IS in 2014.

The enslavement of Yazidi women and children remains the biggest issue associated with the problem. Nearly 3,000 Yazidi women continue to be held captive by IS forces. The disturbing and egregious accounts of escaped victims highlight the presence of sex trafficking in Sinjar, Dohuk and other parts of Iraq. The Kurdistan and Sinjar Women’s Protection Units are realizing the importance of protecting Yazidi women. Women recruits are being trained to defend themselves better and participate in rescue initiatives.

The Turkish Red Crescent has played a pivotal role to combat the problem throughout the course of the conflict. As an important regional partner, Turkey’s management and access to the problem remains strategic. In 2014, Turkey built a refugee camp with the capacity to accommodate over 16,000 Yazidis. Turkey also provided humanitarian aid to cater to the immediate needs of the people. Over 20,000 blankets were given to homeless Yazidis.

Furthermore, USAID is also focusing its aid efforts on minority groups in the Middle East. USAID and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) also jointly consented to concentrating on the recovery of minority groups. The UNDP Funding Facility for Stabilization was also reviewed.

As many Yazidi Muslims have fled the city of Sinjar, a majority of them are taking refuge in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq. The restoration and reconstruction of the city of Sinjar can only begin with cooperation between the Kurdistan regional government, the Iraqi government, and the international community. Resettlement agendas should also continue to be a key objective in alleviating the effects of the conflict.

Given the sheer size of the growing humanitarian crisis facing key stakeholder groups in Iraq, it is vital to address the plight of the Yazidis. This will bring about a new and important phase in mitigating the impacts of the IS problem in the region as it focuses on the recovery and protection of important minority groups.

http://www.borgenmagazine.com/plight-of-the-yazidis/
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:08 pm

Yazidi Women Finally Go To School
Defying ISIS And Their Own Parents

Jane Arraf

Before she went to New York last fall to speak to thousands of people, Najla Hussin had never been more than a few hundred miles from her village in northern Iraq.

Hussin, 20, is from Sinjar in northern Iraq, where ISIS swept in four years ago to kill and enslave members of the ancient Yazidi religious minority.

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani activist for girls' education, met Hussin and other young Yazidi women during a trip last summer to the Kurdistan region of Iraq. She invited Hussin to speak on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly.

For Malala, Now 20, Birthdays Are Best Spent With Girls Who Dream Big

ISIS massacred Yazidi men and is believed to have captured more than 6,000 Yazidi women and children in 2014 - using many of the girls and women as sex slaves and rewards for militants. The kidnappings and killings are considered genocide by the United States and the United Nations.

Before ISIS, the Yazidi community in Sinjar was one of the poorest and most underdeveloped groups in Iraq. In some villages, it was considered improper for girls to go to school. But now, young Yazidi women like Hussin have resolved to take their future into their own hands.

"It was a new experience and it was good for me to do everything alone," says Hussin, in a village in the Kurdistan region of Iraq where her family now lives. "I was happy because I shared my story with people and they will know how hard I worked to get an education."

There were a lot of firsts on Hussin's five-day trip. The first time in an airport and on a plane, the first time in a big city.

When Hussin first spoke to NPR, she had dyed her hair turquoise blue, which faded to green. It was a small rebellion among some much bigger ones. She's under 5 feet tall and in her checked shirt and jeans she looks even younger. But she is fierce.

"When I was 8, I wasn't going to school and all the boys were going. I asked my parents, 'Why can't I do the same?'" she says.

Najla Hussin in her family's trailer that she shares with some of her 12 brothers and sisters. Hussin, a 20-year-old Yazidi woman, has struggled, against her parents objections, with the suicide of a friend and displacement by ISIS' genocide of her people, to go to school. She's now in ninth grade.

In socially conservative Sinjar, girls were expected to stay home and do work in the house or on the farm until they married as teenagers. Hussin persuaded her parents to let her attend primary school. That stopped in seventh grade.

"They said, 'That's enough of going to school. She should be a housewife,'" Hussin recalls her parents saying. "I was thinking of myself as a child, not as a married woman ... and I thought all my dreams won't come true."

Runaway bride

So she escaped. On the very day she was to marry the son of a friend of her father's, she threw off her high heels, hiked up her long dress and ran. When she came back a few days later, her father was so angry he didn't talk to her - or let her go to school - for a year.

Then she witnessed something so terrible she didn't want to study. Her best friend died after setting herself on fire. The friend's brother had found out she had a boyfriend and was threatening her.
Self-Immolation Rises As Desperate Tunisians Seek Escape From Poverty

"I saw her when she was burning," Hussin says. "I saw everything and after that I couldn't focus on anything. I was thinking of that all the time."

A whole year went by and she had no interest in studying. Then ISIS came to their village.

Like many Yazidis who escaped to the Kurdistan region, Hussin's family ended up living in a construction site with plastic sheets for walls.

There was no school, and there were no teachers, so Hussin gathered the younger children from the neighborhood together to teach them to read and write.

A year later, she got to go to school again. That's where she met Hadiya Haskan, who also escaped from Sinjar. We went to visit Haskan in a nearby camp for displaced Yazidis.

When Haskan first spoke to NPR last summer after meeting Malala, she still had big dreams. She wanted to go to college, maybe in America. She wanted to be a writer.

Hadiya Haskan and her husband Amin Shani Bagi in their tent in a camp for displaced Yazidis in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Haskan is 19 and in 11th grade. She dreamed of going to college but says she had to get married because her family needed the money. "It's alright though because I love him," she says.

A few months later, she was married. She's 19 and in 11th grade — like almost all Iraqis in areas that were under ISIS control, she lost years of school.

She says she got married because her father and brothers couldn't find jobs and her family was desperate for money. In traditional Yazidi culture, the groom pays the bride's family. Her family received about $3,000 — enough to pay the medical bills and living expenses for her brother to go to college.

"Our family situation was very bad," says Haskan, over tea in her tent. "I needed to go to the doctor and there was no money and my brother wanted to go to college and there was no money. I felt so bad just thinking about our situation."

Haskan says it's OK because she loves her husband. Amin Shani Bagi, 23, is smart, at the top of his political science class in university, and handsome. He says if Haskan gets into college, he will help her study.

It isn't the life that Haskan dreamed of, growing up in a village in Sinjar. None of her five older sisters had ever gone to school, but she insisted that she shouldn't stay home just because she was a girl.

It was a two-hour walk. When she couldn't go, she studied at home with her brothers' and cousin's books — including an English dictionary.

"I said, 'What's this?' They said, 'It's a dictionary.' I said, 'I want to read this,'" Haskan recalls. "I was 8 or 9. So I read the English dictionary and then when I went to school I was the best in the class."

Haskan ran away from home at 15 when her parents told her she had to drop out of school to marry her cousin.

"I told them, 'I don't know anything about love.' I said, 'I don't want to marry. What's wrong with you — all of you?'"

She eventually returned home and went back to school. But everything changed four years ago when ISIS swept into Sinjar, killing Yazidi men and kidnapping women and children.

'I really love Anne Frank'

Haskan and her family escaped through Syria and into the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Like most Yazidis, they ended up living on construction sites and in camps with no running water or electricity. For more than a year there were no schools for the displaced Yazidis.

Four years later, with ISIS gone, Sinjar is still too unstable to go home.

Apart from mattresses on the floor, Haskan and Bagi's tent is mostly bare. There is a television with a few books on a stand underneath. One of them is The Diary of Anne Frank — the story of the Jewish teenager who kept a journal while in hiding in German-occupied Amsterdam during the Holocaust. Anne Frank was 15 when the Nazis found her family and sent them to a concentration camp.

Haskan says she was the same age when ISIS came to Sinjar to slaughter the Yazidis.

"I really love Anne Frank ... I am thinking she is in the same situation like me," Haskan says, sitting on the floor of the tent. "It is a different war but the same things happen to us — especially girls."

Hussein shows me a wedding photo. She's wearing a pale yellow party dress, not the big white wedding dress she'd always planned. Instead of splurging on a party, the couple used the money in an unsuccessful attempt to get to Germany. After three years of living in a camp, Bagi says no one is helping them.

"We Yazidis had top students and a lot of them were killed when ISIS came — that's why we don't have a future here," Bagi says.

The young women talk about their futures. Haskan is certain they will get to Germany. She still plans on being a writer.

Hussin says she can't decide whether she wants to be a photojournalist or a nurse. But she knows she wants to be something.

"I'm 20, I should be in college," says Hussin, who is in ninth grade. "But this is the situation. I don't give up."

Link to Article - Photos:
https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/ ... -own-paren
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:19 pm

ISIS still haunts dreams of Yazidi children

The Islamic State has been defeated on the battlefield, but the terror remains for 8-year-old Medya.

The Yazidi girl, found to suffer from post-traumatic stress syndrome, is tormented by images of the bearded, black-clad ISIS soldiers who held her captive for three years and repeatedly raped her mother, Saran, in the room next door.

Medya would cry when she heard her mother’s screams. And even today, when the images become unbearable, Medya faints, sometimes several times a day, said Dr. Jan Kizilhan, a German doctor of Kurdish background who works with traumatized Yazidi women and children.

ISIS views the Yazidis, a non-Muslim group whose homeland is in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq, as devil worshipers whose religion is not among the Abrahamic faiths. ISIS thus considers Yazidis outside the protections of Islamic law, and deserving of harsh punishment.

ISIS fighters invaded the Yazidi homeland in August 2014, killed thousands of Yazidi men and took women as sex slaves. Many Yazidis fled Sinjar, and were stranded in the nearby mountains. Some escaped with the help of American airlifts, and airstrikes against ISIS. Kurdish fighters led the remaining Yazidis to the safety of nearby refugee camps, where they now languish.

Medya and her mother are now in a camp with 8,000 refugees in Mam Rashan, two hours from the Sinjar region. Despite the proximity to their homeland, many refugees are afraid to return.

These fears are understandable, said Elizabeth Prodromou, a professor of religion and geopolitics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in Medford, Mass.

“There are reports that former members of ISIS have shaved their beards and don’t wear their traditional black clothes,” Prodromou said in an interview. “Some of them have moved back to abandoned villages, and are melding into the Sunni population.”

Prodromou noted that some Yazidis keep their suitcases packed in the event they have to leave at a moment’s notice. “The military defeat of ISIS does not mean the end of ISIS,” she said.

The defeat of ISIS also does not mean the end of the group in the minds of traumatized women and children. Dr. Kizilhan sees the urgency of helping Medya and those who have suffered unspeakable horrors at the hands of ISIS.

Fainting is Medya’s escape from the evil she often witnessed in her young life, Dr. Kizilhan said, speaking of the girl's sense of alienation and inability to trust people. This is evident when she is asked a question. Instead of looking at the questioner, she replies to her Minnie Mouse doll, Alis, which she clutches, said Kizilhan.

Medya didn’t speak to anyone, including her mother, for some time. But since Kizilhan and his team of local psychologists have been counseling her, she has become more trusting.

“Sometimes she tells me of dreaming of the natural beauty of the region with snow-capped mountains and streams,” he said. “She is a very smart girl, and if we can rid her of this trauma, she will have a bright future.”

In addition to the work he and his team of therapists do in the refugee camps, Kizilhan currently treats a thousand badly abused Yazidis in his clinic near Stuttgart, Germany.

The German state of Baden-Wurttemberg is helping to train more psychologists in the Yazidi region of Iraq. The state has contributed $1.2 million for the training program.

“A group of the trainees will be taught to educate future therapists themselves,” said Theresia Bauer, minister of science, research and the arts for Baden-Wurttemberg.

Asked whether Germans have a special responsibility to help victims of persecution, Bauer emailed this response: "We have a historical responsibility. This has to be remembered again and again. In this respect it is important to learn from history, to make the present and the future better.”

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2018/02/19 ... ldren.html
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