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Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Mar 15, 2019 1:39 am

Sinjar Under Threat of Another Genocide

The predominantly Yezidi town of Sinjar is facing a serious threat of another genocide after the Islamic State (ISIS) is almost eradicated on the ground, a local official said

ISIS attacked Sinjar and massacred the Yezidis after calling them “infidels”. They killed more than 1,000 people, kidnapped over 6,000 women, men and children, and forced hundreds of thousands to escape their homes.

Speaking to BasNews on Tuesday, Wais Naif, head of Sinjar Mayoral Council, warned that the Yezidis are not safe as some ISIS insurgents are now moving from Syria to Iraq and they could reside in areas around Sinjar in northern Iraq.

He explained that hundreds of ISIS militants were handed over to the Iraqi authorities after they were captured by the Syrian fighters, but the Iraqi government is failing to interrogate them for possible involvement in Sinjar massacre of 2014.

According to Naif, the Yezidis will not feel safe until all perpetrators of Sinjar massacre are faced with justice.

“These militants could form sleeper cells and operate under the same extremist ideology against Yezidis,” he added.

“We don’t want anyone once affiliated with ISIS to return to Sinjar region. The Iraqi government is required to investigate and interrogate all the terrorists it repatriates from Syria."

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Mar 15, 2019 4:32 am

Yazidi hostages traded to
criminals as ISIS loses ground


Yazidi children and women abducted by ISIS at the peak of its power are now being traded by criminal traffickers in Syria as the country’s eight-year civil war morphs into an era of violent lawlessness

Although the Syrian regime is claiming victory and ISIS is close to losing its final scrap of territory, kidnap victims remained imprisoned in parts of northern Syria controlled by Turkish-backed rebels or jihadist militants, say families and would-be rescuers.

The kidnap victims are from Iraq’s Yazidi minority — followers of an ancient monotheistic religion who Isis massacred and enslaved in 2014 in attacks the UN designated as a genocide.

Now new captors are capitalising on ISIS’s fall, taking control of victims who in some cases had been handed over by fleeing ISIS fighters caught by other rebel groups. Captors are demanding up to $30,000 for each Yazidi’s release in a country where the average Iraqi earns $6,000 to $7,000 per year, according to the government.

The post-ISIS kidnap market reflects a breakdown of order in parts of Syria where control has shifted from opposition councils to armed groups harbouring criminal gangs. In areas controlled by President Bashar al-Assad criminality is also rampant.

In ISIS’s self-declared caliphate — which once spanned Iraq and Syria — fighters enslaved Yazidis and traded their victims in meticulously organised markets. Women were forced into sexual slavery and children used as servants or quasi-adopted.

One young woman who fled ISIS’s shrinking territory in north-east Syria was snatched as she sought protection at a civilian home in Deir Ezzor, according to Hassan Sulaiman Ismail, an education official trying to retrieve her.

Yazidi families — among Iraq’s poorest people — are trying to locate a total of more than 3,000 missing relatives bought and sold by Isis members, according to Yazda, an advocacy organisation.

Ahmed Burjus, Yazda’s deputy director, said the authorities had failed to help. “There is no plan from the international community or Iraq or Kurdistan government to rescue those people,” he said. The Assad regime has no control of areas where kidnap victims are being held.

Yazidi women attend a ceremony in Iraq commemorating women killed by ISIS militants © Reuters

One father said he had rescued five of his children from kidnappers and five were still missing.

He learnt via a video sent to him on WhatsApp that one daughter was no longer being held by her original captor, a Saudi ISIS fighter who had died. Instead, he discovered that the 10-year-old had been taken by criminals and was now being transported through Syria.

The girl’s new captors, their Syrian accents audible in the video clip, instructed the gaunt child in an abaya to repeat the day’s date. They sent messages demanding $13,000, then $20,000. “It’s very difficult to collect that much money,” said the man.

The latest videos showed his daughter in a tent. “That means they are civilians,” said the man. “Or ISIS pretending to be civilians.”

In the absence of international rescue efforts, Yazidis have established networks of informants and smugglers within ISIS’s territories to rescue the women and children or buy them from captors.

Launching rescue efforts in jihadist-held Idlib and areas of north-west Syria controlled by Turkish-backed rebels was harder than it had been in ISIS areas, said Abdullah Shrem, a car parts trader turned smuggler who has saved almost 400 Yazidis. “They are bigger territories”.

He estimates non-Isis members are holding about 200 women and children in Syria and hoping to profit by selling them. He is creating new informant networks in order to track them down.

About 25 victims have been bought back from new non-ISIS captors during military operations by US-backed Syrian forces around ISIS’s last bastion in the north-east Syrian village Baghouz, Mr Shrem says.

Thousands of people have left Baghouz during the offensive, forcing military officials to admit that they underestimated their number. Escapers included a handful of Yazidis.

But for families who know their children have been trafficked out of ISIS areas, the clock is ticking. After five years of separation, young children may be unrecognisable or unaware who their real parents are. ISIS captors renamed many.

According to Amy Beam, an independent advocate, Yazidi children were originally sold in Isis markets for $500. Kidnappers have ramped up those prices.

Amina’s 13-year-old son is being ransomed for $30,000 somewhere near Baghouz. She has hope that “as long as he is alive he will come back one day”, but she has no way to pay. Her husband and 17-year-old son are still missing.

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Mar 17, 2019 12:55 am

Nadia Calls For More Action To Help
Abducted Yazidi Women And Girls


Almost five years ago, Daesh attacked the Yazidi population in Sinjar, Northern Iraq. In doing so, Daesh initiated a genocidal campaign against the religious minority group and other religious minorities in Iraq (and Syria).

Their atrocities included “murder, kidnapping, hostage-taking, suicide bombings, enslavement, sale into or otherwise forced marriage, trafficking in persons, rape, sexual slavery and other forms of sexual violence, recruitment and use of children”, forced transfer of population, destruction of cultural heritage and much more.

Despite a pro-active Global Coalition against Daesh, consisting of 79 partners, it has taken close to two years to make significant progress in October 2016. While Daesh is no longer the threat it once was, the fight continues. As the Global Coalition against Daesh continues its assault against Daesh and is currently engaged in combating the remnants of the terror group in Syria, there is hope that they will be able to locate thousands of abducted Yazidi women and girls. Many who were abducted in August 2014 are still missing.

This is why Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nadia Murad, Yazda and their legal counsel Amal Clooney of Doughty Street Chambers have renewed calls for action by the Global Coalition against Daesh to ensure the safe rescue of the estimated 3,000 missing Yazidi women and girls. They are also leading calls to investigate the reported massacre of Yazidi women in Baghouz.

The Baghouz massacre was referenced in a recent report by Reuters. It reported on a fresh mass grave which was found to contain decapitated bodies of several people recently slaughtered by Daesh. Many of the female victims are believed to be the same Yazidi women and girls abducted by Daesh in Sinjar in August 2014.

The recent mass murder puts more pressure on the international community to find the remaining Yazidi women and girls. As Daesh is losing its last battles, there is a high risk that the fighters will try to dispose of the Yazidi women and girls, who are ultimately victim-witnesses to their atrocities. Their lives are in grave danger.

The advocates have also expressed concerns regarding reports that “Daesh members held in Syria have been released and that fighters transferred to Iraq have been sentenced to death following rushed trials that exclude victims and do not comply with international fair-trial standards.”

Indeed, the stories of Daesh fighters being sentenced to death in rushed trials and without the involvement of the victims is not a new allegation. Such an approach is not able to ensure any justice, not for the victims who are deprived their day in court and the right to tell their stories, or against the perpetrators who will not face responsibility for their crimes.

Similarly, there are no visible traces of justice for future generations who will bear the weight of the missed opportunity for truth and justice in the Daesh trials.

Furthermore, according to research into the capacity of the Iraqi courts to deal with Daesh fighters, it is clear that Iraqi courts do not have the necessary capacity – whether in terms of resources, expertise or otherwise. The most appropriate courts to investigate and prosecute Daesh fighters would be the International Criminal Court or an ad-hoc tribunal. Both are yet to be established.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/ewelinaoch ... 3f68222ae2
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Mar 17, 2019 1:00 am

Iraq opens Daesh mass grave in Yazidi region

United Nations assisting with the forensic work

Kojo, Iraq: Iraqi authorities on Friday opened a first mass grave containing victims of the Daesh group in the Yazidi stronghold of Sinjar, where extremists brutally targeted the minority.

Nobel Peace Prize winner Nadia Murad, a Yazidi who escaped ISIS and became an outspoken advocate for her community, attended the ceremony in her home village of Kojo to mark the start of exhumations.

The United Nations, which is assisting with the forensic work, says the first opening of a mass grave in the region will help to shed light on the fate those inhabitants killed by ISIS.

Hundreds of men and women from the village are believed to have been executed by the extremists when they took over the area in 2014.

The Yazidi people were targeted by the extremists who swept across northern Iraq in 2014 and seized their bastion of Sinjar near the border with Syria.

Daesh fighters slaughtered thousands of Yazidi men and boys, then abducted women and girls to be abused as sex slaves.

The Kurdish-speaking Yazidis follow an ancient religion rooted in Zoroastrianism, but Daesh considers them to be “apostates”.

The United Nations has said the Daesh actions could amount to genocide, and is investigating the group’s atrocities across Iraq.

Murad called at Friday’s event for Iraq’s central authorities and those in the Kurdistan region to “protect the mass graves” so that proof could be found of the “genocide of the Yazidis”.

“There will not be reconciliation with the Arab tribes of our region if their dignitaries don’t give the names of those who carried out the crimes so they can be judged,” she said.

The head of the UN investigative team Karim Khan said the exhumation marked an “important moment” for the probe, with 73 mass graves discovered so far in Sinjar alone.

“The road towards accountability is a long one, and many challenges lay ahead,” he said in a statement.

“Notwithstanding this, the spirit of cooperation between the survivor community and the government of Iraq is to be applauded.”

Daesh is currently battling to defend the last shred of its crumbling “caliphate” across the border in Syria in the face of Kurdish-led forces backed by an international coalition.

https://gulfnews.com/world/mena/iraq-op ... 1.62709643
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:15 am

ISIS wives must be held accountable for Yazidi massacre
By Nurcan Baysal

This week I was reminded of August 2014, when Islamic State (ISIS) captured the town of Shingal in Iraqi Kurdistan. I quickly joined a group of activists that rushed to support the Yazidis who had escaped Shingal, helping to establish camps in Iraq and Turkey

For more than a year, I worked as a volunteer in Yazidi camps in both countries and met many Yazidi women with horrific stories. Some of them left children on Mount Sinjar, some had been raped by ISIS members and then shunned by their families as a result, some had seen family members killed in front of them.

They were difficult times. There were shortages of food and water. The Yazidi women were constantly wailing, their voices still echo in my ears today. They would show me family photos of life before ISIS, telling me of what they called the good old days. The Yazidi women said they had two lives; their old life before ISIS, and their new life after ISIS.

I visited Yazidi villages closer to the city of Mosul. Baadre was one of them, the biggest Yazidi village in that area. Many Yazidi women and girls took shelter in Baadre during the winter of 2015, looked after by Yazidi sheikh Mir Amar. It was during a cold night in January 2015 when I met Ilwin, a Yazidi woman who was raped several times by ISIS militants. Her family bought Ilwin from ISIS, but ISIS did not sell her sisters. Ilwin told me that ISIS had put them in a house in Mosul guarded by the wives of ISIS fighters.

Sometimes, she said, these wives helped ISIS members rape the Yazidi women, sometimes they tortured Yazidi women. Ilwin drew a plan of the house in Mosul where her sisters were forcibly kept, asking for my help. I gave it to the Kurdistan Regional Authority Human Rights Centre.

The nights were long in Baadre. We slept in a large room with the Yazidi women and children. It is hard to describe the sounds of their nightmares during the night. I will never forget those nights. I would often wake up to their moans and would look to the lights of Mosul, still controlled by ISIS, and wonder, “Where are you God?”

This week, watching videos from the Syrian village of Baghouz, where the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces are fighting to capture the last patch of ISIS territory, I remembered my days with the Yazidis. In these videos, we see ISIS members and their wives expressing no regrets about what they did to Yazidis. Some of the wives even defend the enslavement of the Yazidis and say it is allowed by Islam.

There are not only Iraqis and Turks among the wives, but there are also Finns, French, Norwegians, Afghans, British, Canadian, Dutch, Russians, Belgians, Indonesians, Filipinas, Bosnians, Chechens and other nationals.

In one of the videos, an ISIS wife from Turkey, Fatma Yılmaz, who was married to five different ISIS fighters in five years, talks comfortably about the massacre and its rapes, looting and killings. She said she joined ISIS to have a comfortable life. A comfortable life killing others!

In another video published by the Daily Mail, an ISIS wife defends the jihadists’ rape and murder of Yazidi women, saying it is “allowed in the Quran”.

Now, we see people debating whether or not these wives should be taken to court. Some wives say they are innocent. While listening to these debates, I remember those who sacrificed their lives to stop ISIS. I remember the mass graves, filled with thousands of Yazidis.

I remember the Yazidi women aged over 40 who were buried alive because they were seen as useless. I remember the small Yazidi children who were sold off and lost their families. I remember the Yazidis who were beheaded. I remember Ilwin and the others. Their cries and moans still echo in my ears today.

Last week, another woman who had fled Baghouz, who said she was British and converted to Islam seven years ago, said that the caliphate is "not yet over". Without bringing the ISIS wives and those who assisted the jihadists to justice, ISIS will never be over. Many Yazidi women and children are still being held captive by ISIS, still waiting for freedom and justice.

Thousands of Yazidis buried in mass graves are waiting for justice

Everyone who supported ISIS, including the wives, had a choice. But they chose to be party to a massacre, they chose to be part of a genocide, they chose to be on the side of evil, not goodness.

If the world wants to stop bearing witness to such horrors, then the international community must act to make the perpetrators of these crimes accountable.

https://ahvalnews.com/isis/isis-wives-m ... i-massacre
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Mar 20, 2019 1:49 am

Clashes between Iraqi Army and
YBS again heat up in western Shingal


Clashes continued between Iraqi soldiers and a Yezidi armed group in western Shingal on Tuesday after a failed attempt to mediate tensions following a deadly skirmish on Sunday

At least one Iraqi soldier was injured and there are unconfirmed reports that a second was killed.

Vehicles belonging to forces on both sides were burnt, Rudaw’s Tahsin Qasim reported from Shingal.

Tensions are high between the Iraqi Army and the Shingal Protection Units (YBS), a Yezidi force with ties to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). The two sides clashed on Sunday night with each blaming the other for instigating the incident.

Representatives from the Iraqi Army and the YBS met in Hasawik village with the Iraqis telling the YBS to leave because they are an illegal armed force. The YBS refused and accused the army of hampering free movement between the Shingal area and Western Kurdistan, the Kurdish autonomous region of northern Syria.

The new clash erupted after their meeting failed. There are three Iraqi Army divisions stationed in the Shingal area, raising fears among the local population that the army is planning some activity.

Sherwan Dubardani, a Kurdish member of the Iraqi parliament from Mosul, told Rudaw that smuggling of weapons, oil, and cigarettes in the Shingal region was adding to insecurity. He accused the PKK of being involved.

Haydar Shasho commands the Ezidikhan Protection Force and is not aligned with the Iraqi forces or the YBS. He confirmed the clashes to Rudaw English on Tuesday, but he could not provide casualty figures.

“The situation varies from place to place and village by village,” Shasho added, explaining that they all have different disputes and grievances.

He claimed that 80 percent of the people in Shingal don’t want a PKK or PKK-affiliated presence in Shingal.

“We understand that the situation in Shingal ends when the PKK leaves,” Shasho said.

He underscored that his forces are not involved in the recent events.

“Ezidikhan forces have not been involved in the clashes over the past days,” he said.

The YBS used to be on good terms with the Iraqi government who was paying salaries of their fighters in Shingal throughout part of the conflict with the Islamic State (ISIS). That ended last year and previous Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi called on all foreign fighters to leave the country.

In Shingal various armed factions operate including the YBS, Hashd al-Shaabi, Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) Peshmerga, local police and security, federal police, and provincial authorities.

Shingal is a disputed or Kurdistani are that is claimed by Erbil and Baghdad. Since the events of September 2017, Shingal officially has been in the security portfolio of the Iraq.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/190320193
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:01 pm

Despite ISIS defeat: Hundreds
of children will forever be missing


Baghouz. With the final offensive against the terrorist militia “Islamic State” (ISIS) in Syria hopes were high that thousands of missing Ezidi women and children would be freed. Almost five years ago, the ISIS terrorist organization kidnapped and enslaved up to 7,000 Ezidis from the northern Iraqi Shingal region and committed a genocide against the civilian population.

Many assumed that the majority of those missing persons were held in the last ISIS stronghold Baghuz in eastern Syria. The joy was great when 60 Ezidis in Baghuz were able to escape from captivity, which nurtured hope for the time being. But the fate of hundreds of children seems to be irreversibly sealed. A brutal reality which the battered Ezidi minority must face and which the international community has to accept blame for.

According to an official list, the number of Ezidis still missing stands at about 3,000, most of whom are women and children. The enslavement, systematic rape and trafficking of Ezidis was an essential part of the IS ideology that celebrated the “reintroduction of the Islamic tradition of slavery” in the IS magazine “Dabiq”.

The abduction of thousands of children and the mass rape of Ezidi women and girls was planned from the beginning of the genocide. The New York Times described the policy of the ISIS as the “theology of rape”.

Ezidi children were separated from their families and transferred to IS households in Syria and Iraq, were they were supposed to be educated as Muslims. The transfer of children to another group by force constitutes a genocide offence according to the UN Convention. The IS had the intention to deprive them of their Ezidi identity. In captivity they were forbidden to speak their mother tongue and given new Arabic Islamic names.

The example of raped Ezidi girls shows how strictly the ISIS oriented itself by its interpretation of the Quran and the Hadith. The preachers of the ISIS declared that the rape of Ezidi girls was only allowed from the age of nine – and thus gave paedophilia a licence. Freed girls and women unanimously report how IS members followed this doctrine. “He tied my hands [to the bed] and gagged me. Then he knelt next to the bed and bowed down to prayer,” a 12-year-old Ezidi girl said. “After the prayer he raped me. Then he prayed again.” Female IS members who also abused enslaved Ezidi women in their households legitimize the enslavement and rape of women and girls to this day.

The Ezidi boys, on the other hand, were educated to become new jihadists. Daily indoctrination with violence glorifying videos of beheadings and suicide attacks were supposed to take away their inhibitions and break their will. When the boys refused, the IS punished them with physical and mental torture. Many of these children witnessed their parents being murdered before their eyes. A trauma that these young souls could hardly cope with and made them susceptible to manipulation. Several of these abused Ezidi boys were sent to the frontline by the IS in Iraq and Syria as fighters and suicide bombers. In 2015, the IS published a propaganda video featuring two kidnapped Ezidi boys aged 11 and 12 committing suicide attacks against Iraqi troops. The video was released by the IS on a Ezidi holiday. Both boys died.

Years of physical and psychological abuse resulted in many of these children hardly being able to speak their mother tongue and sometimes not remembering the names of their parents or their villages. The younger the children were at the time of their abduction, the less likely they were to be identified as displaced Ezidis. Among the tens of thousands of ISIS members who have surrendered to the Syrian-Kurdish forces in Baghuz, there are still hundreds of these children. There are no efforts to identify them. They are left to their fate and the ISIS is given a victory. Even if they are defeated militarily – they managed to turn hundreds of the “unbelieving” Ezidis into Muslims.

Recognizing young children after almost five years of imprisonment also presents a challenge for the parents – if they survived. Often, however, they do not get this opportunity at all because no photos are taken of the children who are with the ISIS families and have surrendered. DNA samples are not being collected either which would allow to identify them. The fact that many of the missing children could be identified with simple pictures is shown by examples such as those of the ÊP editorial staff.

Within a few hours, family members of several children, who fortunately remembered their origins and had been freed in Baghuz, were found. In the case of the boy Farhad, the ÊP editorial team took exactly nine minutes to find the boy’s uncle and mother. The boy’s picture was sufficient for this. In the case of the 10-year-old Dilbirin, it took ÊP editors eight minutes to locate a cousin of him who has been part of the Baden-Württemberg program for traumatized Ezidi women.

However, many children can only be identified by a DNA test. Such a broad DNA search for missing Ezidi children will, however, not be conducted. The expense for the international coalition would be too high and the interest in the Ezidi community is too little. The Ezidis have neither the means to carry out such efforts themselves, nor do they have the political influence to demand such a mammoth task from the international community.

Family members therefore rarely succeed in freeing their youngest members if their trail has not been lost. In one of the most recent cases, an uncle followed his nephew’s trail until he was able to buy him back for a horrendous sum of 30,000 US dollars. 10-year-old Kiran spent half his life in slavery. He also was renamed Ahmed. His father, Kiran says, was killed by ISIS terrorists before his eyes, his sister sold as a slave. His mother, who was first taken with him to Baghuz in Syria, died shortly afterwards. Kiran’s uncle followed his nephew’s lead until the opportunity arose to buy him out.

Rarely can families raise such sums once they have the opportunity to buy their relatives’ freedom. The “Office for the Rescue of Kidnapped and Abducted Yezidis” in the Kurdish city of Duhok, which is subordinated to the Prime Minister’s Office, was set up specifically for this purpose to deal with this issue and pay the ransom. In the past, the Kurdish government boasted several times about the office’s work.

Affected families, however, had to pay 10,000 US dollars in advance before the office sprung into action. This sum cannot be raised by many of the impoverished families who still live in refugee camps today. Without the help of Ezidi NGOs, which advance the money, paying the ransom would be almost impossible for many families. If the ransom payment went smoothly, the 10,000 US dollars would be paid back to the families. In at least three cases this did not happen. The rampant corruption in the region does not stop at that office either. The Iraqi government has also made no effort to help the Ezidis find and buy their relatives kidnapped by the ISIS.

According to unconfirmed reports by activists, Ezidi women and children were also kidnapped to other Islamic countries. Several activists claimed to have statements and reports confirming this. The place of refuge for many ISIS fighters and enslaved Ezidi women and girls is Turkey. The women and girls are also said to have been taken to Saudi Arabia. However, there has been no confirmed case so far.

Overrunning villages in the 21st century, enslaving thousands of people, raping thousands of young girls and offering them for sale on the open street, torturing young children and bragging about it openly in a magazine, was considered impossible by many or too much to imagine. But that is exactly what happened. Before the eyes of the international community. Now, the same international community is abandoning thousands of children to their fate as the global public does not seem willing to help them.

It has not been the first attempt in the Ezidi history of destroying their existence and torturing them psychologically. Again and again, women and children have been abducted in the past centuries to be brought to an Islamic environment and to be deprived of their identity.

Therefore, during the current and ongoing genocide, Ezidis have no choice but to painfully accept this reality. Ezidis, who like Essa are longingly waiting for the return of their relatives, will be bitterly disappointed. This genocide will also persecute them for generations to come. There can only be justice if the perpetrators are brought to justice for their crimes: before a special UN tribunal.

http://www.ezidipress.com/en/despite-is ... -60xgyzX8Y
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