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Kurds need NEW leader and unite with ALL other Kurds

A place for discussion and exchanging ideas about Kurdistan issues here, also a place for sharing article & views and analysis about Kurdistan .

Kurds need NEW leader and unite with ALL other Kurds

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 04, 2018 2:34 pm

Front Against Turkish Invasion: “Remove Turkish troops"

The Front Against Turkish Invasion with large numbers of activists, religious scholars, MPs, individuals and NGO representatives as members held a press statement in Sulaymaniyah in front of the Kurdistan Regional Parliament. The Front Against Turkish Invasion also submitted a petition to the Kurdistan Regional Parliament.

“LET’S LET THE WORLD KNOW OUR PROTEST, LET’S REMOVE TURKISH TROOPS”

Front Against Turkish Invasion Member Avan Cemal read the statement and demanded a special session in the Kurdistan Regional Parliament against the Turkish invasion. Cemal relayed the demand for the government to let the global public know the protest of the people of Kurdistan against the invasion and to pass a decision to remove Turkish troops from the Kurdistan region.

Cemal also said the government should implement the decision no.37 taken in 2003, and relayed the demand to review the border crossing agreements signed in 1978 and 1984 between the Baath regime and the Turkish state.

EMIN: “THE PRESENCE OF TURKISH FORCES IS NOT LEGAL”

Goran Movement MP Şêrko Heme Emîn said: "We are not pleased with the Turkish state invading Bashûrê (southern) Kurdistan territory. The presence of Turkish and Iranian forces in the Kurdistan region is not legal. We believe the demand posed to the Parliament by the Front Against Turkish Invasion is important. We will lay weight on it. The Parliament needs to gather for a special session and take urgent decisions on the matter.”

The Kurdistan Parliament had issued the decision no.37 in 2003 to remove foreign forces (i.e. the Turkish army) from the Bashûrê Kurdistan borders.
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Re: Front Against Turkish Invasion: “Remove Turkish troops"

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:02 pm

Personally, I believe:

ALL Turkish forces should be removed from ALL Kurdish lands

There is NO Kurdish problem

The ONLY problems Kurds have are caused by the Turkish armies invasion into Northern, Southern and Western Kurdistan and the Arab invasion into Southern Kurdistan

Let us not forget the oppressive Iranian government but in fairness, the Iranian government oppresses everyone especially WOMEN

We had ALL best take note of what took place in Iran, because Erdogan is turning Turkey into an Islamic state X(

The continued oppression of Kurds

MUST STOP

The continued presence of Turkish and Arab forces on Kurdish land

MUST STOP

The continued Turkification and Arabization of Kurds

MUST STOP

The continued destruction of historical sites on Kurdish land

MUST STOP
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Re: Front Against Turkish Invasion: “Remove Turkish troops"

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:57 pm

Stop the Turkish invasion of South Kurdistan

KNK called upon all governments and international organisations (the UN, NATO, the EU and the Arab League) as well as the world’s democratic peoples, to oppose this Turkish aggression.

Kurdistan National Congress (KNK) released a statement about the Turkish state’s invasion of southern Kurdistan, northern Iraq.

The statement by KNK is as follows;

“The Kurds in Iraq and Syria have been engaged in an epic battle against the Islamic State (ISIS) in Iraq and Syria, an organisation that stands in opposition not only to the Kurds, but also to the region as a whole, in its attempts to create a Salafist system. This attempt poses an immense threat to humanitarian values, beliefs and democratic norms. In the war against this barbaric gang the Kurds have played a deeply significant role, opening the path for their final defeat. Today, ISIS is losing ground and their capacity to threaten the West, especially the EU countries, has been significantly reduced.

However, the AKP government, which has been complicit with ISIS in its barbaric attacks, is not satisfied and having realised that it could not neutralise the Kurdish Freedom Movement with ISIS, has begun a more direct attack. It now aims to destroy all the gains and progressive developments made by the Kurds in both the South and West of Kurdistan.

The Turkish state’s illegal bombing and invasion of Afrin in Northern Syria

The Turkish state has illegally bombed and invaded Afrin, a Kurdish-majority region which had been a peaceful oasis in a war-torn country, a site of refuge, and stronghold of the democratic confederal project. This criminal invasion has led to hundreds of deaths and a further wave of mass displacement. Most alarming are the indications of plans for full-scale ethnic cleansing of Kurds.

Turkey’s potential invasion of Iraqi Kurdish territory

There are increasing signs of an imminent full-scale invasion of Iraqi Kurdish territory, including the mountainous Qandil region of northern Iraq, in an attempt to further encircle and strangle the only place of freedom in the region. Turkish warplanes have carried out frequent bombing campaigns in the Kurdish areas (Metina, Avasin, Zap, Basyan, Gare, Xakurk and Kandil) in Kurdistan- northern Iraq and have killed many civilians.

Representatives of the Kurdish people have repeatedly raised their fears and called upon all governments and international organisations (the UN, NATO, the EU and the Arab League) to prevent Turkey’s military border incursions and violations of Iraqi sovereignty.

As yet there has been no international response, and the state of Turkey is emboldened to make further incursions and to attempt to take control of the region by deploying additional troops and establishing new military bases ( in addition to the18 bases already established) and intelligence outposts in the region. With the Turkish Gendarmerie engaging in military parades in the villages within the Sidekan district of the province of Diyana, region of Hewler (the capital of KRG) governorate, it is clear they are treating the occupied land as their own territory.

Break the silence against Turkey`s invasion of Kurdistan

We call on all relevant bodies (political parties, human rights organisations, trade unionists and activists) to stand with us and take action against this violation of international law, to unambiguously condemn this crime of aggression, and to demand that Turkey withdraws its troops from Kurdistan.

We call upon all governments and international organisations (the UN, NATO, the EU and the Arab League) as well as the world’s democratic peoples, to oppose this Turkish aggression.”
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Re: Front Against Turkish Invasion: “Remove Turkish troops"

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:19 pm

Qandil and the decline of the Turkish regime

Please click on photo to enlarge
941

As the 24 June elections near, there are increasing signs of Erdoğan's demise. While "peaceful times" were instrumentalized for electoral success some time ago, Erdoğan's only hope is now war and conflict now. The target, as always, is the Kurds.

In recent days, a possible attack on Qandil has been made public several times. But there are basically long plans in this regard. According to various statements, the Kurdish side is informed about such an attack and accordingly prepared.

The Turkish government intensified its attacks on southern Kurdistan (northern Iraq) in the spring. Some areas in the border region were de facto occupied. Areas where guerrilla positions are suspected have been bombed for months. Drones fly over the areas 24 hours a day.

According to the statements of the People's Defense Forces (HPG), the guerrilla forces are scattered around the area so as not to become the target of the air strikes. The Turkish army, on the other hand, after the intense bombardment from the air, rescues soldiers with help of helicopters in the mentioned areas. The deployment of the soldiers is always carried out under the protection and observation of warplanes and drones.

The soldiers build positions and warehouses in the region with the support of air force. The guerrillas, on the other hand, surround these positions and target them regularly.

These developments have focused on the Bradost area in the last two months. The Turkish forces have set up some positions there, but clashes continue.

However, the Turkish army is not as close to Qendîl, as claimed in the Turkish media. The currently contested areas are closer to the Sidekan area. The goal of the Turkish attacks is to separate Xinere from Sidekan and take a stand there. It currently seems likely that the battles will last until the fall.

The current location of the Turkish soldiers is about 100 kilometers from the Qandil region. To get to Qandil, the Turkish troops have to cross Soran, Choman, Rewanduz and Diyana. However, these areas are impassable with vehicles. It is unclear what can happen in the steep mountains and deep valleys of the region.

The Turkish army is well aware of this. That is why it is very important to observe what preparations are made for the attack on Qandil. It is spoken of planned air raids, assassinations and kidnappings. It is also spoken in this context of demands to the United States.

If possible, they want to conduct the pre-election attacks to influence the election results in their favor. But success is difficult. There are very extensive operation preparations against the Qandil mountains instead. The US has given the green light (in consideration of relations with Russia and developments in Syria), but it continues to refer Turkey to Baghdad. Ankara is again waiting for the conclusion of the formation of a government in Baghdad.

Also without Iran, a march on Qandil will not be possible. Because Qandil is located mostly on the border with Iran. For Iran, the situation is even more complicated, because such an attack on the Kurdish forces can bring about various problems for Tehran.

The KDP is well disposed towards the Turkish plans of attack. The other Kurdish forces are, however, not. Representatives of the KCK assume that an attack is possible, especially before the elections. KCK Executive Board member Mustafa Karasu told ANF: "The AKP can do anything, but in the event of an attack, the Kurds can turn it into greater success for themselves."

If one believes the Turkish representatives and media, the attack on Qandil is only a matter of time. So-called experts who do not even know where Qandil is on the map claim that the PKK is withdrawing its forces to Shengal.

It would come as no surprise if any time soon a Turkish flag is hoisted somewhere in Southern Kurdistan and this place is sold on television as Qandil. It will be tried to complete this coup before the elections.

It is also likely that the losses suffered and Turkish soldiers killed before the elections will be addressed more intensively in order to lead the much needed psychological war for the country's internal control.

The AKP/MHP regime is currently failing to put its own issues on the agenda, to keep the economy on its feet and to win votes. However, a military operation in the Qandil Mountains will impose a war on society and political life in the country.

This plan will continue to be followed after June 24th. If the AKP and MHP lose their majority in parliament on June 24, they could set a new election. To win the new elections, they need an even wider war. The war zone will be Kurdistan.

So they will "update" their plan from the time of 7 June 2015. They will explain to society that they are at war and therefore no fundamental changes could be made. They will try to achieve “victory” and win the elections. But a victory in this area is not possible. With the acceleration of the war machine, they can only accelerate their own decline.
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Re: Will Erdogan's AKP use fight against Kurds to win electi

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Jun 17, 2018 4:35 pm

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's biggest power grab?
Davis reported from Berlin

Turkish voters head to the polls June 24 to decide whether to give President Recep Tayyip Erdogan even more control, in what is being called his biggest power grab yet.

Though many said they would vote against Erdogan amid his repression of civil rights, an ailing economy and hostile foreign policy moves, few believe their president will lose his job.

"You cannot stop a tsunami, and you cannot stop Erdogan either after he has gathered so much power – he is devastating the country like a tsunami," said Ömer Yilmaz, an unemployed 25-year-old from Istanbul. "He won’t leave power even if he loses. He will do anything and everything to win."

Erdogan called the elections 18 months ahead of schedule, after saying the country needed a stronger executive. Under a referendum that passed narrowly last year, his office gains sweeping new powers after this election, including the abolition of the post of prime minister and allowing the president to issue decrees and appoint judges. Before the referendum, the Turkish presidency was a ceremonial office.

But Erdogan arguably has already taken control of Turkey. The former prime minister and Istanbul mayor now runs the country under a state of emergency declared in July 2016 after a failed coup. Since then, the president has jailed dissenters and journalists and silenced political opponents.

Many citizens have grown tired of Erdogan's strongman tactics. Erdogan likely won't muster the 51% of votes needed to skip a runoff election for the presidency, said Ilter Turan, a professor of political science at Istanbul Bilgi University. His rivals might then have a chance to line up behind an alternative.

A unified opposition coalition also has a good chance of winning back parliament, creating a potential check on Erdogan’s power, Turan said.

"The opposition is very energized, unlike earlier when they thought it was a foregone conclusion that Erdogan would win and were demoralized," he said.

One of the most electrifying factors has been inflation and unemployment in the Turkish economy, developments hurting his nationalist base.

"I studied business administration. I speak (foreign) languages but I cannot find a decent job.,” Yilmaz said.

In what used to be one of the Middle East's more secular nations, many other Turks want to pivot away from the conservative Islamic ideals the president has used to rally support. Erdogan has promoted the construction of mosques and madrassahs – or Islamic schools – loosened rules that barred women from wearing headscarves in public sector jobs and restricted alcohol advertisements.

"Freedom of expression is at rock bottom," said Nilgun Yilmaz, 56, an accountant in Istanbul. "If you criticize, you are fired, you are put into prison. There is only freedom to praise Erdogan."

"I want to recover the secular system," she added. "There is also too much tension going on among the people, and that is unsustainable."

Erdogan has also criticized Western leaders, clashed with U.S.-allied Kurds and sought to improve relationships with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Iranian leaders who are invested in Turkey's war-torn neighbor, Syria. Relations with the United States are strained over Syria and over the U.S.-based Turkish cleric, Fethullah Gülen, whom Erodgan blames for the attempted coup.

"Turkey is now considered an authoritarian state as opposed to a democracy," Turan said. "I think if the government changes, there would be a restoration of democratic politics."

Democratic changes could help repair relations with the European Union and the U.S., Turan added. Turkey historically has been opposed to Russian and Iranian meddling in the region and is also a key NATO ally.

But Erdogan's supporters imagine no such scenario in which the president will be ousted from office.

"Our president has done so many good things for the country that I cannot even think to vote for someone else," said Saliha Coskun, 46, a housewife. "If he leaves – I don't even want to think – we will lose all we have won. God willing, he will win again."

Given the way that Erdogan dominates state-controlled media and other political institutions, many of the president’s opponents seem to think similarly.

"It is hard to digest for me, but I think under these conditions, Tayyip Erdoğan will win again," said Saim Levent, 26, a waiter. "He has created a machine that does not allow any other option. Everything is in his hands, under his control."

https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/worl ... 693439002/
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Re: Will a vote for Demirtaş be a vote for Erdogan

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Jun 17, 2018 4:53 pm

Will a vote for Demirtaş be a vote for Erdogan

Would it not be better to vote for Turkey’s main opposition the Republican People’s Party (CHP)

Demirtaş and the HDP will not be strong enough to take the Presidency away for Erdogan

Therefore the votes for Demirtaş will be wasted

By all means vote HDP in the local elections but in the Presidential election, the only way to rid Turkey of Erdogan is for everyone to vote for the main opposition party, the CHP

Love them or hate them, the CHP are the ONLY party that stands any chance to free the country of Erdogan

Remember: Erdogan already controls Turkey under a state of emergency and can do exactly what he wants

We would love to hear YOUR views on this :D
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Re: Will a vote for Demirtaş be a vote for Erdogan

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:34 am

Important things to remember

Erdogan's AK Party is NOT running on it's own, it has set up an electoral alliance with the MHP and others

Turkey has already agreed to switch from a parliamentary system to an executive presidential system after a referendum approved the changes last year

The changes will come into effect with the next elections, which had originally been set for November 2019 will now be taking place shortly

If the HDP does not join the CHP in it's electoral alliance against Erdogan, all it will be doing is helping Erdogan by getting people to waste their votes

There is NO WAY Demirtaş will become President but if Kurds were to wake up and ALL support the CHP, there is a slim chance such an alliance could defeat Erdogan
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Re: Will a vote for Demirtaş be a vote for Erdogan

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:57 pm

The MOST important thing is to get rid of Erdogan

1 vote for HDP as a local party

1 vote for CHP's Muharrem Ince as presidential candidate

Muharrem Ince is the ONLY person with even the slightest chance of beating Erdogan

Erdogan has won nearly a dozen elections and dominated Turkish politics since his Islamist-rooted AK party first swept to power in 2002

We have all seen Erdogan change Turkey from a secular country into an Islamic State - akin to Erdogan's friends the other Islamic State (ISIS)

Remember: The elections will mark Turkey’s transition to a presidency with new sweeping executive powers, that have ALREADY been agreed under a referendum last year

Remember: It was Demirtaş open support for Ocalan and the PKK that caused so many of his fellow MPs to be imprisoned
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Re: Will a vote for Demirtaş be a vote for Erdogan

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 21, 2018 2:30 am

Could Erdogan lose? What to know about Turkey's elections

Turkish voters head to the polls Sunday in transformative elections that will usher in a new system of government, giving sweeping new powers to whoever wins the presidency.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan is used to winning elections -- he served as Turkey's prime minister for three terms from 2003 and then as president since 2014. He narrowly won a referendum last year that will scrap the role of prime minister and create a powerful executive presidency.

But a new election is needed to trigger those powers, and if Erdogan wins, Turkey will see an even more muscular strongman at its helm.

What are Erdogan's chances of winning?

Pretty good. Erdogan is leading in the polls -- but in Turkish politics, nothing is a sure bet. Erdogan has some clear advantages. A government crackdown on the media following an attempted coup in 2016 has meant that Erdogan and his ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) dominate the airwaves and get the most ink. Vocal critics have been imprisoned, and the President has appointed pro-government officials to the election commission.

But there is a strong opposition and most polls indicate the vote is likely to go to a runoff round. Opposition candidates have also found their own tools. They have harnessed the power of new media to get their message across, and there are genuine competitors on the ballot offering genuine alternatives. While Turkey's election may not be an even playing field, votes are not routinely rigged in the country and voter fraud is minimal. As the prominent Turkey analyst Asli Aydintasbas wrote, "Turkey is not Russia."

What are the key issues?

The economy: Erdogan has long relied on his economic achievements to win elections, but that won't be so easy this time around. The Turkish lira has hit all-time lows, inflation is on the rise and the robust growth of recent years is expected to slow dramatically.

The Kurds: The Turkish army has been fighting the separatist Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), deemed a terrorist organization, for nearly four decades. Erdogan's AKP has ruled out returning to a peace process that collapsed in 2015, and the Turkish military, meanwhile, has intensified assaults on PKK strongholds in Iraq's Qandil Mountains ahead of the vote.

At the same time, Turkey's Kurdish population, particularly in the southeast, is a vital constituency for Erdogan. Their vote tends to split between his AKP and the pro-Kurdish HDP. But the AKP's recent alliance with the nationalist MHP, which takes a hard line against the Kurds, could alienate this key base. If the HDP gains at least 10% of the vote, it will pass the threshold needed to give it a presence in parliament, and that could mean it deprives the AKP of its parliamentary majority.

Syria: The large number of Syrian refugees living in Turkey has also become an election issue. Several parties have said they hope to send Syrians back to their country, though they are careful to say they will do it only after the war is over and they emphasize the importance of peace-building there. Turkey's involvement in the Syrian war, as well as its continued fight with the PKK, has inspired acts of terrorism in the country in recent years, another concern for voters.

Who's in the running for president?

Turkey's story for more than a decade now has centered around Erdogan and his unwavering popularity. Unlike previous elections, this time there are more candidates to choose from, most of whom are promising to preserve Turkey's parliamentary system.

Muharrem Ince
Leading the pack against Erdogan is Muharrem Ince, candidate for the main opposition, center-left Republican People's Party (CHP). He is promising a more independent judiciary, greater personal freedoms and an end to excessive government spending.

He is known for his fiery speeches and for being tough on Erdogan's AKP, bringing a charisma that had been sorely lacking in the CHP for years. His campaign rallies have been colorful -- he is often seen singing and dancing to traditional songs, and he once rode a bicycle on stage as a jibe against Erdogan's excessive spending.

Meral Aksener
The only woman in the running is Meral Aksener, a veteran politician who briefly served as interior minister in the 1990s. As a conservative nationalist, Aksener threatens to steal support from Erdogan voters on the right. The candidate broke with her MHP party when it joined Erdogan in a ruling coalition, and is running from her new center-right IYI Parti (Good Party).

Her campaign has been about countering what she has described as AKP's mismanagement of the economy. If she won, Aksener would be the first female president, but not Turkey's first female head of state -- Tansu Ciller was elected Turkey's first prime minister in 1993.

Selahattin Demirtas
The HDP's Selahattin Demirtas is leading his campaign from prison, where he has been remanded since November 2016 following the failed coup, for what his party calls politically-motivated terror allegations. He is accused of supporting the outlawed PKK. Members of parliament from Demirtas' party have also been jailed or removed from their posts due to alleged terror affiliations.

Demirtas' campaign has focused on improving quality and diversity, and his only public appearance in the campaign period was a 10-minute pre-recorded speech on Turkish state broadcaster TRT, which every candidate technically has the legal right to use. In his speech, a visibly skinnier Demirtas called on Turkish voters to unite against Erdogan, and also criticized the President for threatening to bring back capital punishment after the failed coup.

What will the new system look like?

After the vote, the position of prime minister will be dissolved and all its powers transferred to the president, a role that had traditionally been ceremonial.

One key change is that the president will have the power to issue decrees -- in other words, create laws unilaterally. Erdogan has been able to issue decrees over the past two years only because his government placed the country in a state of emergency following the failed coup. But he may not be able to keep the country in that state for much longer, so the new system would give him a way to retain that power, should he be re-elected.

Turkey's executive government will look a lot like the United States'. The president, for example, will have the power to appoint cabinet ministers directly. In the past, only members of parliament were allowed to hold cabinet positions.

The president will also be able to appoint a number of officials to a supreme court board, which is in charge of selecting judges and prosecutors. Controlling that body could mean influence over the courts.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/06/20/euro ... index.html
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Re: Could Erdogan lose? Basic details about Turkey's electio

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 21, 2018 11:54 am

Humanitarian aid spending makes Turkey most charitable country

Turkey was the most charitable nation in 2017 with nearly $8.1 billion spent in humanitarian aid, an independent international development organization said.

Almost 30 percent of all international humanitarian aid, $27.3 billion, came from Turkey, according to the Development Initiative's (DI) Global Humanitarian Assistance Report. The U.S., Germany and the U.K. followed Turkey with $6.68 billion, $2.98 billion and $2.52 billion.

The country's humanitarian aid expenditures were nearly 1 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017. Turkey's GDP was around $850 billion in 2017, with the U.S. more than $19 trillion, Germany at $3.8 trillion and the U.K. at $2.6 trillion.

Turkey was ranked third in the DI report for 2013, 2014 and 2015 and second on the list after the U.S. in 2016 with $6.3 billion spent in aid. It also hosts the highest number of refugees, 3.9 million, in the world, according to official figures. The number of Syrian refugees living in the country was 3.6 million as of May.

Although it is struggling for economic growth while trying to join the league of developed countries after recovering from years of economic mismanagement, Turkey is determined to earmark more for humanitarian aid. Under Justice and Development Party (AK Party) governments, humanitarian assistance efforts gained momentum, and the country's aid agencies rose to prominence for aid in disasters and assistance to refugees. The country's efforts allowed it to host the World Humanitarian Summit, a first-of-its-kind summit by the United Nations to coordinate humanitarian efforts.

State-run Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TİKA) leads Turkey's global outreach in humanitarian aid. TİKA oversees projects from the Middle East to Latin America, from construction of hospitals to vocational training for disadvantaged communities among other means of development aid. The Turkish Red Crescent also raised its profile in the international community with its increasing presence in humanitarian aid efforts. The charity is involved in aid efforts from setting up refugee camps to delivering food packages in conflict zones and disaster-hit regions across the globe.

The report also stressed that 2 billion people were poor worldwide, and 753 million of them face extreme poverty. "Poor people are defined as those living on less than $3.20 a day, extreme poverty is defined as living on less than $1.90 a day," the report read. The report stressed that in 2017 humanitarian aid totaled $27.3 billion, while it was $26.4 billion in 2016, $25.8 billion in 2015, $22.1 billion in 2014 and $18.4 billion in 2013.

Most of the humanitarian aid went to Syria ($2.58 billion), Yemen ($1.55 billion), Iraq ($1.42 billion), Palestine ($1.15 billion) and South Sudan ($1.1 billion), the report noted. The report said: "An estimated 201 million people in 134 countries needed international humanitarian assistance in 2017." "A small number of complex crises continue to absorb the majority of humanitarian assistance -- 60 percent of all assistance was channeled to 10 countries only, with 14 percent going to Syria, the largest recipient, and 8 percent to Yemen, the second-largest," the report added.

The report also highlighted that Syria was the single largest recipient of humanitarian assistance for the fifth consecutive year.

DI is an independent international development organization that focuses on the role of data in driving poverty eradication and sustainable development. Several international institutions contributed to the report such as the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), TİKA and the World Health Organization (WHO).

https://www.dailysabah.com/turkey/2018/ ... le-country

Excellent publicity for Erdogan :D
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Re: Could Erdogan lose? Basic details about Turkey's electio

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 21, 2018 11:59 am

Anger swells over new attacks on kittens in Turkey

The cat’s life could not be saved and the the 50-year-old suspect has been arrested

Fatal assaults targeting two kittens have shaken Turkey, days after politicians voiced support for a new law to prevent violence against stray animals following the horrific killing of a puppy in the west of the country.

A 50-year-old suspect was arrested on June 20 in Istanbul’s Eyüp district after he was caught raping a three-month-old kitten, according to local media reports :shock: :ymsick: X(

The suspect told the court that he “has been an alcoholic for the past 40 years and he doesn’t remember anything,” but the judge remanded him in custody, citing blood stains on his shirt and trousers.

Despite medical intervention after the incident, the cat’s life could not be saved.

A second horrific case also hit Turkish news outlets on the afternoon of June 20, in which a cat was found in the western city of Bursa’s Yıldırım district with four of its feet cut off.

Police have launched an investigation after public outcry on social media.

The incidents come after a puppy was found on June 13 by passersby in a wooded area in the Sapanca district of the western province of Sakarya, fighting for its life as four of its feet had been cut off X(

Locals hospitalized the dog, which succumbed to its injuries two days later despite an emergency operation in Istanbul.

The operator of a heavy duty vehicle working in the area was arrested on June 17 on charges of killing the dog.

Amid the outcry, a number of high-ranking politicians, including President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, vowed to boost animal protection laws in the country.

The ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) even announced that an animal rights bill would be the top priority after the June 24 elections if it is re-elected.


http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/anger- ... key-133535

Excellent publicity for Erdogan :D
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Re: Could Erdogan lose? Basic details about Turkey's electio

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 21, 2018 12:12 pm

Kurds traditionally voted for AKP

Click on image to enlarge
952

Prior to last elections, many voters in Turkey’s Kurdish-majority areas had traditionally voted for AKP, which had won every successive parliamentary election since 2002.

But an apparent fallout between the government and many Kurdish voters ahead of the last elections gave rise to the HDP at the expense of the AKP.

“Most of the people who voted for the HDP in those elections had been voting for the AK Party during all the previous elections,” Galip Dalay, a research director at al-Sharq Forum and senior associate fellow on Turkey and Kurdish Affairs at Al Jazeera Centre for Studies, told Middle East Eye.

But many Kurds became unhappy with certain aspects of AKP’s policies, especially its stance on Syria’s Kurdistan,” said Dalay, in a reference to Turkey’s reluctance to give military aid to Syrian Kurds fighting Islamic State (ISIS) group militants in Kobane.

“The AK Party policy towards Kobane was the number-one factor (that turned many Kurdish voters against the government),” explained Dalay, adding that “events around Kobane have caused a big psychological and emotional disconnect between the governing party and their previous Kurdish voters”.

However, Dalay also noted that a secondary factor was the AKP’s adoption of “a more nationalist language, which did not go very well with the (Kurdish) voters,” even though the rhetoric was not coupled with any “concrete” action on the ground.
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Re: Could Erdogan lose? Basic details about Turkey's electio

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 21, 2018 12:23 pm

List of previous Turkish general elections:

Turkish general election, November 2015 – November 1, 2015 – Total: 550

    AKP: 317 seats
    CHP: 134 seats
    MHP: 40 seats
    HDP: 59 seats

Turkish general election, June 2015 – June 7, 2015 – Total: 550

    AKP: 258 seats
    CHP: 132 seats
    MHP: 80 seats
    HDP: 80 seats

Turkish general election, 2011 – June 12, 2011 – Total: 550

    AKP: 327 seats
    CHP: 135 seats
    MHP: 53 seats
    Independent: 35 seats (included 29 members of the Peace and Democracy Party)

Turkish general election, 2007 – July 22, 2007 – Total: 550

    AKP: 341 seats
    CHP: 112 seats
    MHP: 71 seats
    Independent: 26 seats (included 20 members of the Democratic Society Party)

Turkish general election, 2002 – November 3, 2002 – Total: 555

    AKP: 363 seats
    CHP: 178 seats
    Independent: 9 seats
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Re: Could Erdogan lose? Basic details about Turkey's electio

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 21, 2018 12:36 pm

Is Muharrem Ince the man to challenge Erdogan's dominance?
By Alex MacDonald

Huge crowds gathered in the Kurdish-majority city of Diyarbakir to hear Muharrem Ince speak in support of his bid to become president of the republic of Turkey.

The city is no stranger to large political rallies, having long been a focal point for Kurdish nationalists agitating for greater autonomy or even independence from a state which they claim has long attempted to erase their identity.

What made this rally unusual was that Ince is the candidate for the Republican People's Party (CHP), the organisation that Kurds have historically held most responsible for their marginalisation.

“First, we will teach our children Turkish as a formal language. Secondly, a language spoken with parents at home, whether it is Kurdish, Arabic or Circassian," Ince told the crowd, in his trademark fiery rhetorical style.

"This is not enough. We will make them the citizens of the world, meaning we will teach English, French, Italian, Arabic, Russian, Japanese and Chinese to our children."

The CHP, the party of the republic's founder, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, has long struggled to reach beyond its core voting base of nationalists and secularists. Since its founding in 1919, the party has been seen as elitist by the religious conservative core of central Anatolia, and as chauvinist and authoritarian by the country's Kurdish minority.

But with those opposing Recep Tayyip Erdogan more determined than ever to overcome their differences to try to challenge the president and his long-dominant Justice and Development Party (AKP), the tables have turned, and in Ince the CHP may have found someone who can break through the religious/Kurdish glass ceiling without alienating its core voter base.

Ince, a former physics teacher who is an MP for the northwestern province of Yalova, has long been known as an outspoken CHP member willing to defy the leadership of the party.

In 2016, he broke with his party's whip and voted against lifting the immunity of members of the People's Democratic Party (HDP), a pro-Kurdish party accused by the government (and the CHP) of having links to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) :ymapplause:

“How could you eliminate immunity in such a climate in which the judiciary has become subservient to the government?” Ince told the Sozcu daily at the time, warning that if HDP members were arrested then CHP members would be next :-s

Since being chosen as the party's candidate on 3 May, Ince has publicly called for Selahattin Demirtas, the imprisoned co-leader and presidential candidate for the HDP, to be released from jail so he could campaign. The wives of the two candidates even met in a "solidarity" meeting in Diyarbakir :ymapplause:

The reason why courting Kurdish votes matters is that, should the presidential elections go to a second round of voting, any chance of defeating Erdogan will rest on securing the votes of Kurds - votes which have in past gone to Erdogan.

    'He writes poetry, he is interested in physics and science, he speaks about films, he dances the traditional dances of Turkey - it is hard to imagine Erdogan dancing!'
    - Ali Tirali, CHP activist

While the ruling AKP had for many years been able to court the votes of the religious and conservative Kurdish voting base, promising both investment for the troubled region and an expansion of Kurdish civil and language rights, the relationship between the party and the community has largely collapsed.

Firstly, because of a brutal conflict in the southwest between the Turkish state and Kurdish militants, which has been waged for decades but has flared up in recent years, leaving at least 3,638 people dead, hundreds of thousands displaced and areas including the historic Diyarbakir neighbourhood of Sur, as well as the towns of Cizre, Sirnak, Nusaybin, in ruins.

Secondly, because of Erdogan's decision to ally with the far-right Nationalist Movement Party (MHP), who have long been the staunchest opponents of Kurdish rights in Turkey.

Although the HDP has been excluded from the parliamentary national alliance consisting of the CHP, the centre-right Iyi Party and Islamist Felicity Party, its parliamentarians have reacted warmly to Ince's openness.

“We are pleased that the opposition’s efforts are so strong. If we do not remain in the second round we will support Muharram Ince,” said Mithat Sancar, an HDP MP.

Aykan Erdemir, an analyst and former CHP parliamentarian, hailed Ince's ability to pursue "a smart strategy of highlighting his humble origins, wit and bipartisanship as the antithesis of the pomp, quick temper and partisanship that have lately come to characterise Erdogan".

A CHP Erdogan?

In some ways equally as difficult for the CHP has been courting the conservative religious voters that make up rural Anatolia.

For the last presidential election in 2014, the party put forward Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, a former head of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, as its candidate, in a bid to woo the AKP's support base.

While Erdogan only won the first round of the presidential elections with 51.79 percent of the vote, the choice of a conservative as the CHP's candidate enraged many of the party's core supporters. The party suffered further humiliation when Ihsanoglu decided to join the MHP and openly backed Erdogan for the 2018 poll.

Unrest in the CHP ranks was further exacerbated when rumours spread that the party was considering supporting former president and Erdogan ally-turned-critic Abdullah Gul. The party moved quickly to deny the rumours after outcry from supporters and MPs, including Ince himself.

By contrast, Ince is very popular with the CHP grassroots, but the controversy highlighted the difficulties the party faces in trying to court religious conservatives.

Since hitting the campaign trail, Ince has attempted to highlight his "common man" appeal, often appearing to tread the same territory as Erdogan. Like Erdogan, Ince's family derives from the northern province of Rize on the coast of the Black Sea.

In speeches, he has pointed out that his family are religious conservatives, and that his sister even wears the headscarf (an item of clothing long despised by the CHP).

“My sister has been wearing a headscarf... but we do not use it for voting as you did, we will not use it," he said in a 2013 speech.

"Women with headscarves are our sisters too and we’ll not let you use their faith for your political desires.”

    Efeler Diyarında Harmandalı oynanır pic.twitter.com/JEY9Np2oP2

    — Muharrem İNCE (@vekilince) June 5, 2018

With little media coverage in Turkey, Ince's campaigning has been very hands-on - he has traversed the length and breadth of the country, speaking to large rallies and calling on his followers to post videos online to circumvent the heavily state-influenced news outlets.

Ali Tirali, a youth activist supporter in the CHP, hailed Ince as a "Kemalist and social democrat" successfully reaching out beyond the CHP base to appeal to the nation's diverse communities.

"Ince is particularly represented in the international media as the ‘CHP version of Erdogan’, but he is a very different man. He writes poetry, he is interested in physics and science, he speaks about films, he dances the traditional dances of Turkey - it is hard to imagine Erdogan dancing!"
An uphill struggle

Ince faces an uphill struggle. The latest poll released by the Gezici polling company on Thursday indicated that Erdogan was set to get only 47.1 percent of the vote in the first round voting, with Ince on 27.8.

However, were Ince able to gather up the votes of the other opposition presidential candidates then he might achieve what has hitherto been dismissed as a remote possibility by political analysts both inside and outside the country.

Were Ince to actually win, he would inherit the presidency in a highly fractured country, with a looming economic crisis on the horizon.

"Ince's challenge - if he defeats Erdogan in the runoff voting - would be to transform a leader-oriented and top-down political culture into a deliberative and consensus-building polity," said Erdemir, adding that he expected the CHP candidate to delegate to an array of experts while "sharing power with representatives of the wide electoral coalition supporting him".

Tirali, who in the past has been highly critical of attempts by the CHP to put forward candidates such as Gul or Ihsangolu, argued any success for Ince derives from his refusal to simply portray himself as Erdogan-lite.

"He shows that in order to be successful with the right-wing party and get the right-wing votes, you don’t need to imitate right-wing politicians," he said.

"[Previously] we saw the elections and voting patterns as very identity-based and Ince is showing something different. If someone can make the voters believe that he will do better things for the country, he can get their votes. I think that’s very important."

http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/ince- ... 1834753621

This article is available in French on Middle East Eye French edition.
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Re: Could Erdogan lose? Basic details about Turkey's electio

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 21, 2018 7:39 pm

Turkey's Erdogan seeks new term with greater powers
[size90]By Associated Press and Tariq Tahir For Mailonline[/size]

    First became the leader of Turkey in 2003, when he was elected Prime Minister
    Now looking to be re-elected President under system critics say is one man rule
    For the first time Turkey will elect a Parliament a President in Sunday's ballot
    Erdogan facing a more united opposition while his own campaign is lacklusture
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said he wants to become Turkey's 'grandmaster' and help his country become one of the world's top powers if re-elected.

The 64-year-old Erdogan is standing for re-election in a presidential vote on Sunday in a vote that could cement Turkey's switch from a parliamentary to a presidential system, which was narrowly approved in a referendum last year.

The most powerful and polarizing leader in the history of modern Turkey would take office with vastly expanded powers, in a system that critics have compared to one-man rule.

His opponents have promised a return to a parliamentary system with a distinct separation of powers.

Since he took office as Prime Minister in 2003 he has given a name to each stage in his consolidation of power in Turkey. First he called himself the apprentice then the journeyman and then the master.

Now, he says a new five-year term would elevate him to the role of 'grandmaster' and help him make Turkey one of the world's top powers by the time the republic marks its centenary in 2023.

Opinion polls have put Erdogan several points ahead of his closest competitor in the presidential race.

However, he would need to win more than 50 percent of the votes for an outright first-round victory and that looks less likely. Analysts say the outcome could be decided in a second round runoff on July 8.

Erdogan, who has never lost an election, is this time facing more robust opposition figures and parties cooperating with each other in an anti-Erdogan alliance.

For the first time ever, Turkey will elect a new parliament at the same time, but his Justice and Development party's election campaign has appeared a little flat and uninspired.

It has been focusing on past achievements and making odd campaign promises such as the creation of neighborhood 'reading houses' offering free tea and cakes.

Analysts even speak of the possibility of Justice and Development losing its majority in Parliament.

'(Erdogan) remains by far the most popular politician in Turkey,' said Sinan Ulgen of the Istanbul-based EDAM think tank. 'He is still the one that is the most likely to be elected, but it is not a foregone conclusion.'

Erdogan called the presidential and parliamentary elections more than a year earlier than scheduled amid signs that the Turkish economy may be heading toward a downturn.

Despite strong growth figures, inflation and unemployment have hit double-digit figures while the lira has lost some 20 percent of its value against the dollar since the start of the year.

Additionally, the polls are being held as nationalist sentiment is high following a Turkish military operation into a Syrian border enclave earlier this year that drove away Syrian Kurdish fighters that Turkey brands as terrorists.

Turkey has recently intensified air raids on a suspected Kurdish rebel stronghold in northern Iraq, a move that could further rally votes for Erdogan.

The most powerful leader since the Turkish republic's founder, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, Erdogan remains popular in Turkey's conservative and pious heartland.

Many see in him a strong leader who stands up to West, who brought stability, oversaw an infrastructure boom, who improved health care and relaxed strict secular laws, for instance allowing women to wear Islamic headscarves in schools and government offices.

His critics say Erdogan, in pursuit of power, is turning the NATO country that once hoped to join the European Union into an increasingly authoritarian state.

They accuse him of curtailing democracy and freedom of speech, of jailing opponents, including students, journalists and activists, especially following a failed military coup in 2016.

A state of emergency declared after the coup attempt has led to the arrests of some 50,000 and seen more than 110,000 dismissed from government jobs.

'Erdogan is the man to deliver,' Erdogan's adviser Ilnur Cevik told The Associated Press in an interview, countering accusations that Erdogan is in pursuit of greater powers.

'Erdogan does not have absolute power - he has the affection of the people.'

The allied opposition - which includes the center-left and pro-secular Republican Peoples' Party, the center-right Good Party and the small Islamic Felicity Party - has vowed to roll back Erdogan's presidential system and to improve relations with allies and the European Union.

Also challenging Erdogan is the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party, whose charismatic leader is running for president from jail.

IIsmail Buyukcakar, who played football alongside Erdogan in the early 1970's in Istanbul's Camialti team

Buyukcakar points to a picture Erdogan, taken at the football ground in Kasimpasa, Istanbul. His old teammate said the President is 'good fortune for Turkey'

Erdogan's AKP has formed an alliance with the far-right Nationalist Movement Party. Already in control of a majority of Turkey's media, Erdogan's government has changed electoral rules, raising fears that the elections may not be fair.

The changes allow government officials to control ballot stations, for ballot stations to be moved to new locations on security grounds and for ballot papers lacking an official stamp to be counted as valid.

Ismail Buyukcakar, who played soccer alongside Erdogan in the early 1970s in Istanbul's Camialti team, recalls a young man who had leadership qualities and oozed confidence.

'He is a good fortune for Turkey. We need to take advantage of this good fortune,' Buyukcakar said. 'In my opinion, Turkey needs our president for another 20 years.'

Link to Articles - Photos:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... owers.html
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