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Kurdish money from Europe to Turkey supports Erdogan

A place to talk about domestic politics in Middle East (Iran, Iraq , Turkey, Syria) Also includes topics about Assyrian, Armenian, Chaldean .

Kurdish money from Europe to Turkey supports Erdogan

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jul 04, 2018 12:39 am

Öcalan’s lawyers appeal to Constitutional Court against isolation

The visitation ban imposed upon Abdullah Öcalan has been taken to the Constitutional Court.

Lawyers have taken the case to the Constitutional Court (Anayasa Mahkemesi - AYM) after the Bursa Executive Court No.1 issued a ban for “visitation, written communication, right to a phone call and lawyers visits” for Kurdish People’s Leader Abdullah Öcalan and other Imrali prisoners Hamili Yıldırım, Ömer Hayri Konar and Veysi Aktaş by the Bursa Chief Public Prosecutor’s Office.

“NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LAW VIOLATED”

According to the Mesopotamia Agency (MA), the appeal by Öcalan’s lawyers states that all appeals by Öcalan’s lawyers have been rejected by the Bursa Chief Public Prosecutor’s Office for the last 6 years and 10 months, while appeals by lawyers of the other prisoners had a similar fate since they were transferred to the Imrali Prison 3 years 2 months ago.

The appeal says the ban violates the Ban on Torture and Mistreatment, the Right to A Just Trial, the Right to Privacy and Family Life, and the Ban Against Discrimination in the Constitution and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and adds: “With this practice, the Derogation in Time of Emergency (Art.15), the ban against abuse of restriction of fundamental rights and freedoms wider than foreseen in the Convention (Article 17, ECHR) and Limitation on Use of Restrictions on Rights (ECHR Art.18, The Constitution Art.15) have been violated.”

“NO EVIDENCE”

The appeal states that the verdict and practice in question are “not lawfully foreseeable in several aspects”: “There is no evidence, no findings, documents or reports that go against the law about the ban on family visits. And, for arrestees, there is no regulation in the law on lawyer visits or the laws cited above to ban family visits. Despite these facts, family visits having been banned with the verdict openly goes against the law and removes the ‘foreseeability’ criteria.”

Lawyers stressed that Constitutional rules have been violated and added that the discipline write-ups cited in the demand by the prosecution and the verdict by the court were all issued between 2005 and 2009.

“ECHR AND CPT STANDARDS SHOULD BE HEEDED”

The appeal points out that lawyers’ visits have been unlawfully banned and adds that the reasons cited are also outside the law.

The appeal also states that the unlawfullness have increased several times over and that ECHR verdicts and CPT standards on the matter, as well as reports on Turkey, should be heeded.

The appeal stressed that, “For all the reasons cited above, it has become a necessity to demand that it be stated that the strict conditions of isolation the applicants have been subjected to with the aforementioned verdict constitute a violation of the ban on torture and mistreatment.”
Last edited by Anthea on Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Kurdish money from Europe to Turkey supports Erdogan

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Re: Öcalan’s lawyers appeal to Court against isolation

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Aug 12, 2018 12:57 pm

Rallies in Europe for Öcalan

Abdullah Öcalan has been demanded by activists in the capital of Denmark, Copenhagen, as well as in the German cities of Berlin and Hamburg.

A tent action was organized in Copenhagen, Denmark's capital. The tent had been prepared with photos of Öcalan as well as leaflets on the Kurdish Leader and the Kurdish questions which were handed out to people.

Rally in Hamburg

A rally was held in the Hamburg city of Germany, as part as the "Freedom for Öcalan" campaign. The weather turned against demonstrators and the walk originally thought turned into a rally.

Scores of Kurds joined the rally and writer Anja Flach, on behalf of Rojbîn Women's Council delivered a speech as did Burhan Gokhan, on behalf of HDK Hamburg.

It was also pointed out the experience of Rojava where the Democratic Confederalism project has found with success its practice.

The speakers underlined that those who don’t want the Democratic Confederalism project to succeed are precisely those who are imposing the regime isolation on the Kurdish People’s Leader in Imralı.

Öcalan, said the speakers, represents a real chance for peace in the Middle East.

Rally in Berlin

The German capital also took to the streets to protest against the isolation imposed on Öcalan
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Re: Kurds could save Hasankeyf from destruction and free Öca

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Aug 12, 2018 1:46 pm

If Kurds had any pride in themselves or their heritage

Or any love for their children

They would have united and preserved Hasankeyf for future generations

They would have managed to free Öcalan who is a sick old man

But Kurds have NO pride

Kurds watch Turkish TV

Not only in Turkey both here in the UK and other countries

Kurds teach their children Turkish both here in the UK and other countries

Kurds supposedly escaped from Turkish oppression yet continue to live as Turks and worse still, they teach their children to be TURKISH

Kurds work hard in Europe, then, take their hard earned money back to Turkey to support Erdogan :shock:
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Re: Kurds could save Hasankeyf from destruction and free Öca

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:52 pm

Turkey accuses US of 'stab in back' as currency woes persist

Moves to ease Turkey's economic woes have failed to stop market turmoil as the country's row with the US deepens.

Turkey's President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, said on Monday that the US was seeking to "stab it in the back".

The US last week imposed sanctions on Turkey over its refusal to extradite a US preacher imprisoned in the country.

The sanctions caused market turmoil, which the central bank attempted - but failed - to soothe with a series of market-boosting measures.

Mr Erdogan told a news conference in the Turkish capital, Ankara: "You act on one side as a strategic partner, but on the other, you fire bullets into the foot of your strategic partner.

As the crisis deepened at the end of last week, the lira and the Turkish stock market slid sharply. Mr Erdogan, who has presided over soaring inflation and borrowing levels, says the lira's fall is the result of a plot rather than prevailing economic conditions.

Turkey's interior ministry said it was taking legal action against 346 social media accounts it claimed had posted comments about the weakening lira "in a provocative way".

Why are Turkey and the US at odds?

The dispute centres on Turkey's refusal to release American pastor Andrew Brunson.

Mr Brunson has been detained for nearly two years, accused of links to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party and the Gulenist movement, which Turkey blames for a failed coup in 2016.

The Turkish president is angry that the US has not taken more action against the Gulenist movement and what he said was a failure "to unequivocally condemn" the 2016 coup attempt. The US has refused to extradite Fethullah Gulen, who lives in Pennsylvania.

US support for Kurdish rebel groups fighting Islamic State (ISIS) fighters in northern Syria is another major difficulty, given Turkey's battle against a Kurdish insurgency in its own country.

Mr Erdogan has also been getting closer to Russia. That creates an awkward triangle, given that Turkey is a Nato member, Russia is Nato's number one threat and the organisation is obliged to defend any member that is attacked.

Nato uses the Incirlik Air Base in Turkey to fight against ISIS and there has been some domestic pressure on Mr Erdogan to close it.

What is happening to the lira?

The lira's worst day was Friday, when US President Donald Trump approved the doubling of tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminium, following Turkey's refusal to free an American pastor who has been in detention there for nearly two years.

Experts have blamed the drop in the Turkish lira on fears that the country is descending into an economic crisis.

Turkey's stock market has also fallen 17%, while government borrowing costs have risen to 18% a year. Meanwhile, inflation has hit 15%.

Turkish lira graphic

Investors are worried that Turkish companies that borrowed heavily to profit from a construction boom may struggle to repay loans in dollars and euros, since the weakened lira means there is now more to pay back.

More than a third of Turkish banks' lending is in foreign currencies, according to Reuters.

Although the lira rose slightly after the central bank's move to support the economy, it still hit a new record low against the dollar.

Investors globally fear the damage spreading and have been prompted to sell riskier assets, including other emerging market currencies.

In midday trading in Europe, London's 100-share index was down 0.6%, while the German and French share markets were down by 0.3% and 0.7%.

What are Turkish officials doing about the lira?

The Turkish Central Bank announced on Monday that banks would be given all the liquidity - help to keep money moving - they needed.

But the bank did not increase interest rates, which would help contain inflation while supporting the lira.

It is not clear if this comes after Mr Erdogan's pressure. The president is famously averse to interest rate rises.

He has dismissed the fall of the currency as "a storm in a tea cup" and urged Turks to sell dollars and buy lira to help boost the currency.

Analysis:
Andrew Walker, economics correspondent

President Erdogan sees Turkey's problems as the result of a plot rather than economic fundamentals. That kind of talk might play well politically with some audiences in Turkey, but it won't wash in the markets.

Turkey has underlying problems in the form of a fairly large international trade deficit, high levels of foreign currency debt owed by the private sector and a persistent inflation problem.

Certainly the situation has been aggravated by the deterioration in political relations with the United States and the higher tariffs that Turkey now faces on its steel and aluminium sales in the US. But the scale of the apparent impact was due to the fact that Turkey was already economically and financially vulnerable.

What do people in Turkey think about this?

Business executive Kemal, who lives in Istanbul, said: "It is not unusual or unexpected to see some companies go under when there is such a sudden devaluation of the currency. However, I do not believe it will crumble the economy."

British holidaymaker Paul Fothergill, who is staying in Dalyan, says he has been holidaying in Turkey for the last 30 years. He said: "Since we arrived on Thursday the Turkish lira has nosedived. It's very sad for locals and investors, but incredibly good for us, the Brits.

"You can imaging how cheap our evening meals and trips have been. The most expensive meal, including drinks and tip, so far was £12 for me and my wife."

Heather, a Briton who has lived in Turkey for 15 years with her family, said: "This last year has seen ridiculous price rises and price differences in shops and supermarkets. Prices of basics like butter, cheese, fruit and vegetables are so expensive that we think twice about putting them in our baskets.

"Petrol and utilities have also seen price rises. Wages have not gone up, so we worry about where this will end. It may be beneficial for those with pounds, dollars or euros but rest of us are struggling."

How is Turkey's currency crisis affecting you? Do you live in Turkey, or are you a tourist in the country? Share your experiences by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45167030
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