Navigator
Facebook
Search
Ads & Recent Photos
Recent Images
Random images
Welcome To Roj Bash Kurdistan 

KDP struggles to reconcile PUK, Gorran demands

A place to post daily news of Kurdistan from valid sources .

KDP struggles to reconcile PUK, Gorran demands

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 03, 2019 11:17 pm

KDP-PUK strike power-sharing deal after Barzani warns time running out

The political deadlock preventing the establishment of a new government in Erbil is over as the Region’s two biggest parties finally struck a deal

The final agreement between the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK traitors) and the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) will be signed in the coming days, PUK spokesman Latif Sheikh Omer told reporters on Wednesday, declining to give details of the deal.

The effect of their agreement was immediate as PUK lawmakers attended the parliamentary session Wednesday afternoon. Since being sworn in on November 6, 2018, PUK members have not attended parliament while their leadership negotiated their role in government.

The PUK joined the session that is dedicated to an amendment of the presidency law “as the first practical step for the formation of the government,” Omer explained.

The announcement that a deal was reached came just hours after KDP leader Masoud Barzani warned his party will not wait any longer for an agreement and would soon press ahead with forming a government alone.

“Now we have reached a stage where we can’t wait and there is no justification for doing so. The time for waiting has ended,” Barzani told a ceremony inaugurating a book fair in Erbil on Wednesday.

“We hope the government is formed by all the winning parties. But frankly, from today onwards, we will not wait any longer. We will form the government soon,” he added.

Efforts to form the new cabinet dragged on for months as rival parties squabbled over their share of power in the new government.

PUK’s Omer said the agreement was reached after “intensified meetings” and a conversation between Barzani and acting PUK leader Kosrat Rasul.

“This afternoon, following a friendly phone call between Masoud Barzani and Kosrat Rasul, both sides reached a joint understanding for the PUK’s position in the Kurdistan Region’s governance system,” he said.

The KDP emerged as the biggest party in the September 30 parliamentary election securing 45 seats – just shy of an outright majority in the 111-seat chamber.

The PUK secured 21 seats and the Change Movement (Gorran) 12.

The three parties may now have achieved consensus on who will hold the top jobs and ministries of government.

Speaking in Erbil, Barzani also commented on the recent ferry disaster in Mosul, in which more than a hundred people died when their boat capsized in the Tigris River on March 21.

“This disaster was the result of bad situations in Mosul along with its system and bad security conditions, especially after its liberation,” he said, describing the incident as “a national and humanitarian disaster which shook our hearts.”

Barzani said Mosul was “left with an unknown fate after its liberation,” adding “the focus was unfortunately on how the money allocated for the reconstruction of Mosul should be distributed and how the parties should distribute the money rather than spend it on services and the reconstruction of Mosul.”

Mosul was under the rule of the Islamic State group (ISIS) for three years. The battle to retake the city left much of it in ruins.

Despite its territorial defeat, Barzani warned ISIS still poses a threat to the region.

Ayad Allawi, a prominent Iraqi politician who was prime minister of the post-2003 transitional government, also attended the ceremony.

Echoing Barzani’s warning, Allawi said: “Iraq has seen military victory [over ISIS], but we haven’t fully achieved peace yet. There is still no peace between the main parties of Iraq.”

Allawi said Iraq has one chance remaining to overcome its challenges.

“It surely is the final chance for Iraq to succeed and for Iraqis to achieve their rights without discrimination and marginalization,” he said.

“This government should stabilize Iraq.”

Erbil-Baghdad relations

Barzani struck an optimistic tone about Erbil-Baghdad relations, which collapsed over independent oil sales and the Kurdistan Region’s referendum to break away from federal Iraq in 2017. He credited Iraqi Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi with salvaging the relationship.

“Having Adil Abdul-Mahdi as prime minister provides a new opportunity and this might be the final opportunity. That is why this opportunity shouldn’t be wasted,” Barzani said.

“We will seriously coordinate and cooperate with his Excellency Adil in order to resolve all the problems, not only problems between the Kurdistan Region and Baghdad, rather all the problems concerning every citizen,” he said.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/03042019
Last edited by Anthea on Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20836
Images: 478
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5945 times
Been thanked: 722 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

KDP struggles to reconcile PUK, Gorran demands

Sponsor

Sponsor
 

Re: KDP-PUK strike power-sharing deal

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:17 am

Back to square one? KDP struggles
to reconcile PUK, Gorran demands


Almost 200 days have passed since the Kurdistan Region held its parliamentary election. Despite several so-called “breakthrough” deals between the three biggest parties, the Region appears no closer to forming a new government

Months of fruitless meetings between the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), and the Change Movement (Gorran) have blighted the process as the rivals bicker over lucrative positions in government.

Disagreements over the presidency were once a serious obstacle, with rivals disputing whether the post should have executive or purely ceremonial power.

Relations between Gorran and the KDP soured in 2015 when Gorran tried to rein in the powers of then-president Masoud Barzani.

Gorran wanted the prime minister to wield executive power instead and for the president to be elected by lawmakers rather than the public.

Relations between the two parties have since warmed and the post of deputy president was promised to Gorran.

However, a new deal promising a second deputy president to the PUK – Gorran’s main rival in Sulaimani province – has placed the KDP-Gorran détente in jeopardy.

If the deal between the KDP and Gorran cannot be reconciled with the deal between the KDP and PUK, a new government will remain elusive.

Kurdistan parliament has not convened since October 2015 because of political disagreements between the KDP and Gorran, the first two largest parties in the Kurdistan Region. File photo: Rudaw/Farzin Hassan. The Kurdistan Region parliament in Erbil. File photo: Farzin Hassan / Rudaw

Farid Asasard, a member of PUK leadership, told Rudaw if Gorran insists upon taking the deputy presidency, “both agreements have to be altered and the distribution of posts has to be re-discussed, which is not easy and time is against it.”

Kwestan Mohammed, a member of Gorran’s General Assembly, told Rudaw the party is ready to give the PUK the post of second deputy president, “but in return we shall be given Peshmerga Ministry or Interior Ministry [because] the second deputy will not leave any role for a deputy from Gorran.”

However, Jaafar Sheikh Mustafa, commander of PUK forces in the Ministry of Peshmerga, has said he will not follow orders from Gorran officials if they are given security posts.

The parties have therefore reached an impasse. Voters are outraged at the continued delay.

“I see the KDP as a man with two spouses. He does whatever he can to please both wives, just to avoid people’s talk and embarrassment,” one Facebook user commented on Rudaw’s recent coverage.

The KDP, which dominates the new parliament, does not want to harm its newly mended relations with Gorran. At the same time, it wants to please the PUK, which had boycotted the parliament, disrupting government business.

As the dominant military force in Sulaimani and Halabja provinces, the PUK’s demands cannot be ignored. Any government excluding the PUK would wield little authority in the Region’s east.

The PUK’s Asasard blamed the KDP for the dispute.

“The issue is that the KDP entered talks in a bad way, and it hastily made a deal with Gorran as a reaction against the PUK. Now, the KDP itself has to resolve the issue even if it costs them a post because the PUK has made its deal and is waiting for these two parties,” he said.

Aso Ali, another member of PUK leadership, said: “The delay of government formation has nothing to do with the PUK. We are awaiting the KDP and Gorran [to make a final agreement] so that we can sign our agreement with the KDP.”

Two weeks ago, KDP leader Masoud Barzani warned further delays to government formation would not be tolerated.

“Now we have reached a stage where we can’t wait and there is no justification for doing so. The time for waiting has ended,” Barzani told a ceremony inaugurating a book fair in Erbil on April 3.

This strong message from Barzani was immediately followed by an initial deal between his party and PUK but it did not produce concrete results.

KDP leader Masoud Barzani addresses the inauguration of a book fair in Erbil, April 3, 2019. Photo: Rudaw TVKDP leader Masoud Barzani addresses the inauguration of a book fair in Erbil, April 3, 2019. File photo: Rudaw TV

Reaching a compromise, the KDP submitted a bill with Gorran in late March to amend the controversial presidency law. According to the bill, the president will no longer be elected through a public vote but by lawmakers.

The bill has been through two readings, according to Hevidar Ahmed, a KDP lawmaker in the Kurdistan Region parliament, but the parties would rather not proceed without the PUK.

“KDP supporters, voters, and cadres keep asking furiously why the KDP is compromising,” Ahmed said in an op-ed for Rudaw.

The best option for the KDP is to “meet most of the demands of the PUK and Gorran – which is more than their size [entitles them to] – to make them participate in the government,” Ahmed added.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/150420191
color=#0000FF]It is shameful that the KDP have to cow down to the traitorous PUK and the backstabbing Gorran[/color]
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20836
Images: 478
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5945 times
Been thanked: 722 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: KDP struggles to reconcile PUK, Gorran demands

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Apr 19, 2019 12:21 am

Gorran and PUK ready to sign on
dotted line or are gaps still too big?


Rivalry between old foes the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) and Gorran has dragged out negotiations on the formation of the next Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). But, more than half a year after elections, there is a glimmer of hope that both sides are softening their hardline stances in acknowledgement of the need to break the impasse and get on with the job they were tasked with by the electorate.

"We have no other option besides reaching agreement," Qubad Talabani said on Thursday at the opening ceremony of the 22nd annual Galawej Festival.

Talabani, deputy prime minister in the outgoing government, topped PUK’s list in the election and received the most votes of any candidate in the September 30 election. He is the son of PUK founder and beloved Kurdish leader Jalal Talabani and was speaking at the festival organized by veteran PUK official Mala Bakhtiar.

"The festival takes place in spring, a season of bad and happy times for the Kurdish nation. This should encourage us to rise above disagreements and work for national and service questions," he told the crowd of mainly intellectuals, adding the government should be formed soon.

The Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) won the election, but failed to secure an outright majority. It has signed agreements with second place PUK and third place Gorran for a coalition government, but still cannot bring its two allies to the table together.

The main stumbling block is over control of the security sectors, which are effectively controlled by KDP and PUK – not the government – as both parties have their own forces. The PUK recently said it wants to see the creation of a second vice presidency position that would oversee military affairs. The president is the commander-in-chief of the armed forces.

Jaafar Sheikh Mustafa, head of PUK’s Peshmerga, has vowed that his forces won’t take orders from a Gorran vice president.

KDP spokesperson Mahmoud Mohammed told Rudaw that in a recent party meeting, they agreed to the idea of two vice presidents. "In the meeting, we have had no issue with adding it or not," he said, but added the issue should be broached through negotiation and not ultimatums.

Nechirvan Barzani, KDP’s nominee for president, and his cousin Masrour Barzani, KDP’s nominee for prime minister, were both present at the meeting.

What the KDP does take issue with, however, is dragging out the process. "Both sides should be considerate of the situation, that further delay is not in the interest of the Kurdistan Region," Mohammed said.

According to information Rudaw has obtained, Nechirvan Barzani has met with the leadership of both PUK and Gorran, asking them to stop hampering political negotiations.

While Talabani sounded conciliatory in his speech on Thursday, PUK has not publicly stated whether or not they are ready to ease up on their demands. They have previously rejected the offer of a second deputy for the prime minister.

Gorran, which initially rejected outright the PUK’s proposition for a second deputy president, seems to be mellowing, albeit with conditions.

"If they insist on this position, then maybe we will, for the sake of the interests of the people, agree to a second vice," Hemin Sheikhani, member of Gorran's National Council, told Rudaw this week.

Gorran, which has no armed forces, has traditionally advocated for abolishing party control of the Peshmerga and Asayesh (security forces). No "single party" should be holding two senior security positions, said Sheikhani, referring to PUK’s desire to hold the Peshmerga ministry in addition to the new vice presidency.

The second vice president should have administrative roles instead, he said.

The KDP is losing patience with its would-be coalition partners. Head of the party, and former president of the Kurdistan Region, Masoud Barzani said earlier this month that there is “no justification” for further delays.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/180420193
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20836
Images: 478
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5945 times
Been thanked: 722 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart


Return to Kurdistan Today News (Only News)

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Majestic-12 [Bot]

x

#{title}

#{text}