Navigator
Facebook
Search
Ads & Recent Photos
Recent Images
Random images
Welcome To Roj Bash Kurdistan 

All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kicking

Discuss about the world's headlines

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Londoner » Thu May 12, 2016 8:18 pm

I hope finally they discover what happened to put the mind of relatives in rest.
User avatar
Londoner
Tuti
Tuti
 
Posts: 1987
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:58 am
Highscores: 0
Arcade winning challenges: 0
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 752 times

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

Sponsor

Sponsor
 

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu May 12, 2016 9:59 pm

Londoner wrote:I hope finally they discover what happened to put the mind of relatives in rest.


The parts they have found so far, were from wide area that I very much doubt anyone will ever find the plane and learn the truth :(
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Londoner » Fri May 13, 2016 7:29 am

Anthea wrote:
Londoner wrote:I hope finally they discover what happened to put the mind of relatives in rest.


The parts they have found so far, were from wide area that I very much doubt anyone will ever find the plane and learn the truth :(


Yes unfortunately, that is true. Even if the parts belong to the same airplane it will not necessarily mean the plane crashed into the sea and passengers died in the sea. :sad:
User avatar
Londoner
Tuti
Tuti
 
Posts: 1987
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:58 am
Highscores: 0
Arcade winning challenges: 0
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 752 times

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Piling » Fri May 13, 2016 8:11 am

It is like all drowned ships becoming ghost ship, before the invention of radio and SOS recordings. Who knows ? May be one day, some pilots will see a ghost plane flying next to them then vanishing.
User avatar
Piling
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 8097
Images: 78
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:57 am
Location: France
Highscores: 2
Arcade winning challenges: 3
Has thanked: 254 times
Been thanked: 2839 times
Nationality: European

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 09, 2016 11:59 pm

MH370 search: New debris found on Madagascar beach

New pieces of debris have been found in Madagascar by a man searching for parts of missing flight MH370.

Blaine Gibson, who has already found possible debris in Mozambique, made the latest discovery on the east coast of Madagascar.

One of the parts resembles an airplane window frame. Mr Gibson has sent images of the finds to investigators.

MH370, flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, had 239 people on board when it vanished in March 2014.

The Malaysia Airlines flight is presumed to have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean after veering off course.

The latest find was made on Riake beach, on the island of Nosy Boraha in north-east Madagascar.

A number of other pieces of debris, some confirmed to have come from MH370, have been found in countries near Madagascar.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-36495617
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 20, 2016 9:17 am

MH370 search: Photos of possible personal items released

Campaigners for families of those on board missing flight MH370 have released photographs of personal items that washed up on a Madagascar beach, hoping to identify them.

Some 20 items found include purses, backpacks and part of a laptop case.

There are no labels identifying them as belonging to the 239 people on board the jet that vanished two years ago.

The items were found by US lawyer Blaine Gibson, who concedes they may be irrelevant in the hunt for MH370.

"They may have just fallen off a ship," Mr Gibson told the BBC.

"Still, I found them on the same 18km (11-mile) stretch of beach where I found suspected aircraft parts [of the Malaysia Airlines jet] so it is important that they are investigated properly."

MH370 was flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014 and is presumed to have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean after veering off course.

The personal items found include a white, black and red "Angry Bird" purse, a tartan handbag and part of a black laptop case inscribed with the letters "MENSA".

Mr Gibson, who has has funded his own search for MH370 debris in east Africa, found them earlier in June on Riake beach, on the island of Nosy Boraha in north-east Madagascar.

As well as the personal items, he also found two pieces of debris that may be from the aircraft itself.

He recently found three pieces of debris in that area, having already found another piece of debris in Mozambique in March, which Australian investigators believe is almost certainly part of the missing plane.

Campaigners have released the images on the Aircrash Support Group Australia website to ascertain whether they may have belonged to MH370 passengers.

The group's chair, Sheryl Keen, said the images were being posted "to make sure everyone has the right and opportunity to view these items".

"The nature of aviation investigations [means] usually people don't get to see the nitty gritty of it. But because these have been found by members of the public we're able to take this opportunity to display the objects," Ms Keen said.

Speaking from the phone in Madagascar, Blaine Gibson told the BBC that a Malaysian investigator was due on the island to collect the pieces, but the investigator's trip was cancelled at the last minute by his superior. "We don't know why," Mr Gibson said.

Now the families have taken things into their own hands by releasing the images.

'What choice do families have?'

Relatives of those on board the plane have expressed frustration at the official investigation into MH370's disappearance.

KS Narendran said that while none of the personal items found belonged to his wife, MH370 passenger Chandrika Sharma, investigators' lack of urgency was disconcerting.

"We don't sense any sense of urgency at any level," he told the BBC from his home in Chennai.

"So what choice do families have but to pull together and help whoever they can?"

He said the current search does not include the only areas of the world where pieces of the aircraft have actually been washed up - beaches on the Indian ocean, thousands of miles from the official underwater sea search.

Link to Full Article - Photos - Video:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-36571822
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 20, 2016 9:31 am

I cannot even begin to imagine what the friends and relations of those missing are going through

It is the sort of nightmare I hope that I never have to go through

More than 2 years

First the hope that somehow somewhere the people from Flight 370 were safe, perhaps stranded on a remote beach somewhere, or perhaps help prisoner by an Islamic group seeking to be payed a large ransom

Was it a terrible accident

Was it a bomb

Was it due to system failure

Where was the wreckage

The lack of wreckage gave people hope

Now the friends and relations are trying to find the truth for themselves by sharing photos of personal items that have been washed up on various shores in the hope that some of the items are recognised and start to lead to the unravelling of this mystery

Because with ALL the modern technology is it IMPOSSIBLE for something that size to vanish so completely from the planet
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Londoner » Mon Jun 20, 2016 2:10 pm

Anthea wrote:I cannot even begin to imagine what the friends and relations of those missing are going through

It is the sort of nightmare I hope that I never have to go through

More than 2 years

First the hope that somehow somewhere the people from Flight 370 were safe, perhaps stranded on a remote beach somewhere, or perhaps help prisoner by an Islamic group seeking to be payed a large ransom

Was it a terrible accident

Was it a bomb

Was it due to system failure

Where was the wreckage

The lack of wreckage gave people hope

Now the friends and relations are trying to find the truth for themselves by sharing photos of personal items that have been washed up on various shores in the hope that some of the items are recognised and start to lead to the unravelling of this mystery

Because with ALL the modern technology is it IMPOSSIBLE for something that size to vanish so completely from the planet


It must be really very painful for the relatives. There is no doubt major powers know what happened. Both Russia and America watch the sky every seconds all over the globe. It was impossible for them to miss it.
User avatar
Londoner
Tuti
Tuti
 
Posts: 1987
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:58 am
Highscores: 0
Arcade winning challenges: 0
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 752 times

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jul 22, 2016 10:40 am

Missing flight MH370: hunt for debris likely to be suspended

The hunt for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 is to be suspended if evidence of the missing jet is not found in the current search area.

The transport ministers of Australia, Malaysia and China, representing the country leading the search, the airline and the home of the majority of its passengers, met to discuss the future of the search in the Malaysian federal administrative centre of Putrajaya on Friday.

They announced that it would “not end, but be suspended” if the completion of the two-year search of a 120,000 sq km arc of the southern Indian ocean west of Australia fails to yield any new evidence.

Less than 10,000 sq km of that area remain, though progress is slow due to poor weather conditions.

In a joint statement, the ministers acknowledged that “despite the best efforts of all involved, the likelihood of finding the aircraft is fading.

“In the absence of credible new evidence leading to an identification of a specific location of the aircraft, the search would not end, but be suspended upon completion of the 120,000 sq km area.”

Liow Tiong Lai, the Malaysian transport minister, told reporters that cost was not a factor in the decision.

It was stressed that this did not mean the termination of the search, and that the aspiration to locate MH370 remained. But any next steps would be dependant on new information that could be used to identify the specific location of the aircraft.

“We remain hopeful that the aircraft will be located,” said Darren Chester, the Australian minister for transport and infrastructure.

The families of the 239 victims were informed before the press conference on Friday afternoon.

That the search would not be extended in the absence of any significant discovery has been consistently signalled by the Australian body in charge for more than a year.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has led the underwater operation for the wreckage of the missing aircraft, which disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014.

Chester said in a statement on Thursday that the search had been “unprecedented in both size and scale, conducted in some of the world’s most isolated waters and at times in extremely challenging weather”.

Progress on the final 10,000 or so sq km of the total search area – about the size of Greece – has been delayed by poor weather, meaning the search could extend into spring.

In March, on the two-year anniversary of the plane’s disappearance, Martin Dolan, the head of the ATSB, said it was “very likely” the wreckage would be found within that area.

But with that possibility dwindling with every square kilometre completed, experts have been forced to consider alternatives.

The three countries agreed in April last year not to extend the search area beyond that 120,000 sq km.

Paul Kennedy, the project director of Fugro – the Dutch company leading the search – acknowledged on Thursday that, if the plane was not found there, “it means it’s somewhere else”.

The company later clarified that it believed the search area was the most probable place and as such the right place to search.

But Richard Godfrey, a member of the so-called Independent Group of professionals conducting their own work to locate MH370, argued in a paper published earlier in July that the ATSB were looking in the wrong place.

He identified a range of latitudes consistent with known data, ocean drift analyses and floating debris that was not captured in the priority search area.

“The failure to find sunken wreckage ... is not surprising,” he wrote. “The underwater search has produced no results so far and the assumptions made in determining the ATSB priority search area should be re-examined.”

To date, four pieces have been identified as almost certainly being from MH370, in addition to a wing flaperon found on La Réunion in July last year.

A large piece of aircraft debris found on an island off the coast of Tanzania in June arrived in Canberra for examination earlier this week.

It is thought to be a wing flap, but technical specialists from the ATSB are working with Malaysian investigators to determine whether it is from MH370.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/ ... e-extended
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jul 22, 2016 10:50 am

The families and friends of those aboard flight MH370 need to know exactly what happened to their loved ones

Everyone who ever boards a plane needs to know exactly what happened to flight MH370

I am not the type of person who believes in conspiracy theories

BUT

Even I have to ask "Is there some reason as to why we - the general public - are not being allowed to know what happened to flight MH370?"
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jul 27, 2016 12:55 pm

MH370: Missing jet 'could be further north'

The crashed remains from the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 could be as much as 500km further north than the current search area, say scientists in Italy.

Their assessment is based on the location of confirmed debris items and computer modelling that incorporates ocean and weather data.

They say this has allowed them to determine where the plane most likely hit the water and where future aircraft fragments might wash up.

The MH370 search will soon be halted.

Authorities have agreed that "in the absence of new credible evidence" the effort to find the plane on the ocean floor west of Australia will be suspended once a zone covering 120,000 square km has been fully surveyed.

That could happen in the next few weeks.

A team led by Eric Jansen, from the Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change in Italy, is the latest to try its hand at using modelling to identify the impact site.

The approach relies on two years of high-resolution data that describe the currents and wind conditions across the Indian and Southern oceans.

Multiple simulations were used to predict were objects might drift given different starting points.

These forecasts were then analysed and the greatest weight given to those tracks that best matched the locations of known MH370 debris items.

These are the parts of the Boeing 777, such as an engine cowling and wing flap, that have since washed up on the beaches of Africa and Indian-ocean islands.

The conclusion is that main wreckage of the plane is likely to be in the wide search area between 28 degrees South and 35 degrees South that was designated by crash investigators.

However, only the southern end of this zone - a priority segment between 32 degrees South and 35 degrees South - is currently being surveyed by underwater cameras and detectors.

This still leaves a swathe of ocean floor to the north where Dr Jansen and colleagues say MH370 could possibly be resting today undiscovered.

One of the advantages of the type of model produced by the team is that its solutions can be updated as more debris is found.

"We use the location where debris is found to create a ranking of the different simulations. So, the simulations that cause debris in all of the locations where this material was found - we rank those higher; and the ones that are not as good at predicting the locations of the debris - we rank them lower. And then we combine the result. This has the benefit that if new debris is found we only have to repeat the ranking, which is very fast, while the simulations of drift over two years take several hours."

This means also that should more debris come to light, the model will refine its solution for where in the ocean the missing jet is most likely to be found.

And given that the underwater search is about to be suspended, Dr Jansen says perhaps greater effort should now be directed towards finding more washed-up debris.

It is an endeavour that would be low-cost, he argues, but would very much aid the type of research he does, while at the same time possibly yielding additional information on the state of the aircraft in its final moments.

Such inferences can be gleaned by examining materials for tell-tale damage.

Dr Jansen and colleagues have published their research in the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences.

Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared in March 2014 with 239 passengers and crew.

Link to Article and Diagrams:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36904981
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Londoner » Thu Jul 28, 2016 5:10 pm

According to London Evening Standard today, the pilot used his home flight stimulator to fly towards the same direction, which it took and lost. If this is true now they can easily identify possible location, where it could have crashed or went.
User avatar
Londoner
Tuti
Tuti
 
Posts: 1987
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:58 am
Highscores: 0
Arcade winning challenges: 0
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 752 times

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Aug 19, 2016 10:19 pm

Air crash investigators will dump replica MH370 wing flaps into the ocean and track them by satellite in a bid to find the missing jet

A two-year search for MH370 is approaching its conclusion experts warn
Only one section of flap has washed up and was outside the search area
Experts will track replica flaperons by satellite to determine drift rates
It is hoped this will narrow down the search area to help find the jet


Air crash investigators are planning to dump replica Boeing 777 wing flaps fitted with satellite trackers into the Indian Ocean in an effort to discover the wreckage of the missing MH370 jet.

The Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 vanished from radar screens on March 8, 2014 shortly after leaving Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board.

In July 2015, a section of the aircraft's wingtip, known as a flaperon, washed ashore on a beach in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island. Now experts want to 'reverse' the flaperon's journey in an effort to determine the most likely crash site.

So far, experts have searched approximately 46,000 square miles of the ocean floor during a two-year operation but have failed to find the missing jet.

Greg Hood Australian Transport Safety Bureau chief commissioner, who last month took over responsibility for the search, is currently trying to identify new areas where the jet could be.

However, a new search would require a new funding commitment, with Malaysia, Australia and China agreeing in July that the $160 million search will be suspended once the current stretch of ocean southwest of Australia is exhausted unless new evidence emerges that would pinpoint a specific location of the aircraft.

Hood said: 'If it is not in the area which we defined, it's going to be somewhere else in the near vicinity.'

Further analysis of the wing fragment known as a flaperon found on Reunion Island off the African coast in July last year — 15 months after the plane went missing — will hopefully help narrow a possible next search area outside the current boundary.

Six replicas of the flaperon will be sent to Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization's oceanography department in the island state of Tasmania where scientists will determine whether it is the wind or the currents that affect how they drift, Hood said. This will enable more accurate drift modeling than is currently available.

If more money becomes available, the Australian bureau, which is conducting the search on Malaysia's behalf, plans to fit the flaperons with satellite beacons and set them adrift at different points in the southern Indian Ocean around March 8 next year — the third anniversary of the disaster — and track their movements.

Meanwhile, barnacles found on the flaperon and an adjacent wing flap that washed up on Tanzania in June are being analyzed for clues to the latitudes they might have come from. The flap is in the Australian bureau's headquarters in Canberra where it has been scoured for clues by accident investigators.

Peter Foley, the bureau's director of Flight 370 search operations since the outset, said the enhanced drift modeling would hopefully narrow the next search area to a band of 5 degrees of latitude, or 340 miles.

Foley said: 'Even the best drift analysis is not going to narrow it down to X-marks-the-spot.'

Some critics argue that the international working group that defined the current search area — which includes experts from the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch, the plane's manufacturer Boeing, Australia's Defense Science and Technology Group, satellite firm Inmarsat and electronics company Thales — made a crucial mistake by concluding that the most likely scenario was that no one was at the controls when the plane hit the ocean after flying more than five hours.

The airliner veered far off course during a flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing. What happened to the plane has become one of the biggest mysteries in aviation, with a wide range of theories, including that a hijacker could have killed everyone on board early in the flight by depressurizing the plane.

The current search area was defined by analysis of a final satellite signal from the plane that indicated it had run out of fuel. Scientists have determined how far the plane could have travelled from a height of up to 40,000 feet after both engines lost power.

But critics who favor the theory that Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah hijacked the plane argue that he could have glided the plane beyond the current search area. Some say he could have made a controlled ditch at sea in order to minimize debris and make the plane vanish as completely as possible. Officials say Zaharie flew a similar route on his home flight simulator only weeks before the disaster.

Foley said Australian analysis of the flap in Canberra suggested that it had not been deployed when it hit the water. It had been retracted inside the wing. A pilot attempting a soft landing would have extended the wing flaps. The Australians are awaiting the verdict of a Boeing accident investigation team on their findings.

Recent analysis of the final satellite signals also suggest the plane was descending at a rate of between 12,000 feet and 20,000 feet a minute before it crashed. A rate of 2,000 feet a minute would be typical of a controlled descent.

Foley said: 'The rate of descent combined with the position of the flap — if it's found that it is not deployed — will almost certainly rule out either a controlled ditch or glide.

'If it's not in a deployed state, it validates, if you like, where we've been looking.'

Crews have not given up hope of finding the plane in the current search area, which because of bad weather and 65-foot swells could take them until December to finish scanning.

Less than 4,000 square miles of seabed, which is outside the original 23,000-square-mile high-priority search zone, remain to be searched.

More than 20 sonar contacts require closer examination by a sonar-equipped underwater drone. These are between 1,700 miles and 1,200 miles from the Australian port of Fremantle where the search ships are based.

Hood said: 'We are still hopeful and optimistic.'

Foley said finding the plane was the only chance of the solving the mystery of what happened aboard Flight 370.

Foley added: 'We will never know what happened to that aircraft until we find it.'

Link to Photos - Video:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... g-jet.html
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Sep 12, 2016 11:39 am

MH370 search: New debris in Madagascar includes 'burnt parts'

Five new pieces of debris that could belong to the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have been found in Madagascar.

Two fragments appear to show burn marks, which if confirmed would be the first time such marks have been found.

MH370, flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, had 239 people on board when it vanished in March 2014.

The flight is presumed to have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean after veering off course.

The findings were made by debris hunter Blaine Gibson, who has previously found other parts of the plane.

Mr Gibson says it is unclear if alleged burn marks were caused by fire before or after the crash


I wonder if the scientists with be able to tell from this whether or not there was a fire or explosion prior to the crash :-?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-37333762
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Sep 15, 2016 9:41 pm

Tanzania debris part of missing plane

A large item of debris found off the coast of Tanzania belongs to the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, Australian investigators say.

The fragment, said to be the inboard section of the right, outboard flap of the plane, was recovered in June.

MH370, flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, had 239 people on board when it vanished in March 2014.

The Boeing 777 is presumed to have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean after veering off course.

The piece is now being examined for any evidence that may indicate how the flap was operating at the time of separation from the wing, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau said in a report.

This could help throw light on whether the plane was being flown when it came down in the sea.

The part numbers and a date stamp on the piece, recovered on Pemba island, helped the investigation.

In addition to the Boeing part number, the report said, the identification stamps had an "OL" number, both unique identifiers to part construction.

The Italian part manufacturer then recovered build records for those numbers, confirming that they belonged to the missing plane.

Very slowly, the clues are piling up. All these pieces that keep washing ashore could eventually help to build a picture of the plane's final moments.

"At the time of writing, the flap section was being examined for any evidence of interaction with mechanisms, supports and surrounding components (such as the flaperon, which abuts the inboard end of the outboard flap) that may indicate the state of flap operation at the time of separation from the wing."

In plain English, it means that this piece MIGHT just help them work out if the flaps were extended when the plane hit the water. If they were, it COULD indicate that the aircraft was being flown by someone at the end. Flaps never extend automatically. So that starts to suggest a deliberate act.

Equally, if the flaps weren't extended, it points more to an accident. To be clear though, none of this will give anything close to definitive answer. It's just a little clue as to what happened.

A number of other pieces of debris, some confirmed to have come from MH370, have been found in recent months off the coast of neighbouring Mozambique and Madagascar.

They include a section of the wing called a flaperon, found on Reunion Island, and a horizontal stabilizer from the tail section and a stabilizer panel with a "No Step" stencil discovered in Mozambique.

All the debris are believed to have been driven westwards from the presumed crash site on ocean currents.

Australia has been leading the search for the missing aircraft, using underwater drones and sonar equipment deployed from specialist ships.

The search, also involving Malaysia and China, has led to more than 105,000 sq km (40,500 sq miles) of the 120,000 sq km search zone being scoured so far.

But countries have agreed that in the absence of "credible new information" the search is expected to end later this year.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-37377514
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 19608
Images: 307
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5797 times
Been thanked: 702 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

PreviousNext

Return to World

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot]

x

#{title}

#{text}