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All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kicking

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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:01 am

MH370 BOMBSHELL: Why experts believe
captain TRIED TO LAND on desert island


MALAYSIA Airlines flight MH370 was the subject of a “catastrophic” on board incident, that made it impossible for captain Zaharie Shah to land despite his best efforts, experts claimed during a documentary

MH370, which had been travelling from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, disappeared on March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board. The Boeing 777 aircraft last communicated with air traffic control at 1.19am when the plane was flying over the South China Sea. Minutes later, it completely disappeared from civilian radar screens during a routine handover from Malaysian to Vietnamese channels.

Analysis of radar and satellite data shows that it suddenly changed course and flew back across Malaysia before turning south of Penang and then towards the southern Indian Ocean.

Many have claimed the sudden change in course proves the pilot, Mr Shah, went on a suicide mission, after a final goodbye gesture to his hometown.

However, Pablo Mason, revealed during ITN’s documentary “Malaysia 370: The Plane That Vanished” why he thought Mr Shah was actually attempting an emergency landing on the desert island of Pulau Langkawi.

The veteran Royal Air Force pilot said in 2015: “I believe at that stage there was a catastrophic failure on the airplane.

“Either a decompression or perhaps an electrical fire that incapacitated the flight crew.

“I think they made a valiant effort to get the plane on to a new course [to Pulau Langkawi].”

Chris Richards, a former pilot with more than 30 years experience agrees the route shows intentions to land.

He added: “My belief is that an experienced captain like Mr Shah would know instantly that he has smoke in the flight deck and he needed to land.

“The nearest possible landing was to the west and I believe he probably turned 270 degrees and prepared for the landing.

"However, he also had the issue of a fire to deal with.”

In March 2014, Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari confirmed that flight MH370 had been carrying lithium-ion batteries in its cargo hold.

These highly flammable electrochemical cells are used in mobile phones and laptops.

They have been responsible for a number of fires on planes in recent years.

However, this theory has not been the most popular among experts investigating the doomed jet.

Many have sided with the view Mr Shah purposely flew the plane off course, avoiding radar detection, before bringing it to a controlled stop in the Indian Ocean.

They hold this view mainly due to the evidence recovered from the pilot’s home in-flight simulator hard drive and debris recovered thus far.

In 2016, Australian officials confirmed they had recovered a route similar to the one taken before MH370 vanished.

A statement read: “The simulator information shows only the possibility of planning.

“It does not reveal what happened on the night of its disappearance nor where the aircraft is located.

“For the purposes of defining the underwater search area, the relevant facts and analysis most closely match a scenario in which there was no pilot intervening in the latter stages of the flight.”

In 2015, a piece of the plane’s wing, known as a flaperon, was discovered on the French island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean.

The debris, which was boxed-up and flown to France, left aviation experts like Larry Vance convinced the plane was brought to a controlled stop.

He told Australia’s 60 Minutes investigation team in 2017: “I think the fuselage is certainly intact somewhere on the bottom of the Indian Ocean.

“When the flaperon was found, everyone should have concluded this was a human engineered event.

“There’s no other explanation.

“The reason we don’t see lots of debris is because it remained in the fuselage and that remains at the bottom of the water.”

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https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/10 ... ngkawi-spt
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Feb 27, 2019 11:09 pm

Ocean Microphones May Have Recorded Lost Malaysian Jet's Crash … Thousands of Miles from Search Sites

Nearly five years ago, the doomed Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 vanished without a trace, with 239 people on board. The search in the Indian Ocean for the wreckage of the aircraft has been the largest and most expensive search effort in history — but it has turned up nothing

Now, a team of researchers says Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 may have crashed thousands of miles from the search locations, based on sounds recorded in the ocean near the time the passenger jet disappeared on March 8, 2014.

In research published Jan. 29 in the open-access journal Scientific Reports, applied mathematician Usama Kadri said underwater microphones in the Indian Ocean had recorded four distinctive sound events, caused by very low-frequency acoustic-gravity waves, around the time that Flight 370 could have crashed into the sea.

His research showed that one of those sound events happened relatively close to the search area — but two others are thousands of miles away, in the northern part of the Indian Ocean, somewhere between Madagascar and the atoll of Diego Garcia in the Chagos Archipelago, Kadri told Live Science. [Flight 370: Photos of the Search for Missing Malaysian Plane]

Investigators suspect that the lost airliner crashed somewhere in the Indian Ocean, although its flight path after it disappeared from civilian and military radars, west of the Malay Peninsula, is not known.

The aircraft's captain, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, had ordered enough fuel for a routine flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing, a flight that would have lasted 7 hours and 30 minutes. But just how long the Boeing 777 jet could have stayed airborne would depend on its actual flight path, its altitude and how many of its four engines were operating.

Ocean sounds

Kadri and colleagues at the University of Cardiff in the U.K. and Memorial University of Newfoundland in Canada analyzed sounds recorded by a network of underwater microphones (called hydrophones), which are maintained by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) to listen for banned nuclear tests.

The CTBTO hydrophones give directional bearings, loudness and frequencies of sounds in the ocean, from which scientists can calculate an approximate location for where those sounds originated.

But the CTBTO hydrophone network is designed to detect underwater nuclear explosions, in concert with other monitoring systems in the air and through seismological tremors in the earth — and it was thought not able to detect a crashing jet.

To learn more about the patterns of sounds made by objects crashing into the ocean surface, Kadri and his colleagues recorded the sounds caused by weighted spheres impacting tanks of water in 2017.

They found that when a massive object like an airliner crashes into the ocean, it creates a distinctive pattern of sound waves — including patterns of very low-frequency sounds known as acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that can be transmitted for thousands of miles through the ocean. [What's That Noise? 11 Strange and Mysterious Sounds on Earth and Beyond]

Kadri's latest research has found that the underwater speed of transmission of low-frequency AGWs, below 5 hertz, can be affected by the elasticity of the seafloor at particular locations.

That means each of the four distinctive sound events in the Indian Ocean identified by the researchers could have originated across a range of locations, but along a particular directional bearing.

Missing airliner

As well as two matching sound events recorded by the CTBTO hydrophones at Cape Leeuwin in Western Australia, the researchers found two sound events recorded by the hydrophones at Diego Garcia that could match the sounds of an airliner hitting the ocean.

Their directional bearings and timings indicated that they both occurred somewhere northwest of Madagascar — thousands of miles from the areas where searchers have looked for wreckage of the aircraft.

But the ocean is a noisy place, and Kadri said the underwater sounds might have also been caused by underwater earthquakes or volcanic eruptions, or even by meteorites or space junk falling in the ocean. [Top 10 Greatest Explosions Ever]

However, they were also valid sound signals that could have been created by the crash of Flight 370, he said.

Kadri said he recognized that the sound events near Madagascar were thousands of miles from the so-called "7th arc" — the line of possible positions of Flight 370 calculated from the aircraft's final radio signals to a tracking satellite shortly before it would have run out of fuel.

Searchers have relied on the 7th arc in their efforts to find wreckage of the missing airliner; it curves through the eastern Indian Ocean, south of the Indonesian island of Java and toward Antarctica, between 300 and 1,800 miles (500 to 3,000 km) away from the western Australian coast.

But Kadri said the positions suggested by the satellite radio data might be inaccurate, or calculated incorrectly, or otherwise misleading.

"I don't want to go into what could go wrong, but there are many things," Kadri said of the 7th-arc data. "It could be anything."

Search at sea

Kadri said that future searches for any wreckage of the airliner should start with scientific investigations of the sound events recorded in the Indian Ocean — without regard to information from other sources, such as the satellite radio data, which could create large inaccuracies.

"All the efforts that were done before, they all relied on the satellite data as given evidence … unfortunately, they found nothing," he said.

Details of the new research had been relayed to the Malaysian and Australian authorities responsible for locating the aircraft, but there are currently no plans to resume the search at sea, Kadri said.

Other experts on the search for the crash site of Flight 370 gave divided opinions about the new research.

David Griffin, an oceanographer at the Australian government's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), told Live Science that he could think of no reason why the 7th-arc satellite data should be disregarded.

Griffin also estimated that crash sites near Madagascar and Diego Garcia would result in floating debris along the East African coast within a few months — in other words, by mid-2014.

But no floating debris from the crash was found there until late 2015 and 2016, around 18 months later, he said.

However, oceanographer David Gallo, the director of special projects at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, said he was not convinced that the satellite data represented by the 7th arc gave an accurate indication of the final positions of Flight 370.

Gallo, who led the successful search for the crash location of Air France Flight 447 in 2011, said the Australian-led searches for Flight 370 had relied on the 7th-arc data because they needed to respond quickly.

But "I'm not now nor ever was a fan of the 7th arc," Gallo told Live Science in an email: "[The] plane could very well have crashed north of Madagascar."

https://www.livescience.com/64861-lost- ... ounds.html
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Feb 27, 2019 11:14 pm

Missing Malaysia Airlines jet off
Vietnamese coast claims engineering buff


MISSING Malaysia Airlines flight 370 may have crashed into the sea off the Vietnamese coast, according to a satellite engineering student

The student said: “One very possible outcome which has been instantly disregarded are the coordinates off the Vietnamese coast at N14.9, 109.15 where MH370 was apparently tracked.”

They said they had been in contact with amatuer investigator Daniel Boyer, who also has a theory as to MH370’s crash site.

Mr Boyer believes the plane crashed in the Cambodian jungle, having spotted what he thinks is the plane on satellite images.

Yao Ming said: “Using simple algebra I am able to plug in distances from the alleged coordinates to Daniel Boyer’s crash coordinates with the time frame given from air traffic control.

“From my calculations if the ignored air traffic control coordinates are correct, the jetliner flew roughly 230-250 miles in the time frame of 33 minutes, giving an average ground speech of about 460-470mph in this time frame and exact distance from both coordinates.

“The average speed of a Boeing 777 in its last half hour of flight matches the exact needed speed to get from both coordinates within air traffic control’s time frame.”

The student said they were encouraged to investigate the matter further after reading “hundreds” of articles from Express.co.uk and other newspapers about MH370.

They claimed Mr Boyer’s analysis “remarkable”, despite presenting different coordinates.

The alleged Stanford student said: “Another supported piece of data is the magnetic angle at which the possible plane crashed."

At 12.0159, 104.152 in satellite images it is between 210 and 230 degrees west-southwest, perfectly aligning with the angle at which the jet must have flown to achieve a direct line flight from the air traffic control coordinates off Vietnam’s coast.”

The official investigation into MH370 concluded that the plane likely crashed into the Indian Ocean.

This is based off data from satellite 3F1, owned by British satellite telecommunications company Inmarsat.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/10 ... on-Vietnam
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Mar 04, 2019 1:31 am

New hope to find missing flight as
Malaysia says it could RESUME search


MALAYSIA has said it could resume the search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 if companies interested in the hunt come forward with viable proposals or credible leads

Flight MH370, carrying 239 people, quickly became the greatest mystery in aviation history when it vanished on its way from Kuala Lumpar to Beijing on March 8, 2014. In January 2017, Malaysia, China and Australia, called off a two-year A$200million underwater search in the Indian Ocean after finding no trace of the plane. US exploration firm Ocean Infinity then led a second three-month search, but also didn't find the aircraft.

But Malaysia’s transport minister Anthony Loke has offered fresh hope of a new search for MH370, saying the country will consider any credible leads being put forward.

Malaysia was prepared to reward firms searching for the stricken aircraft under a “no-cure, no fee” agreement, meaning payment would only be made if they located the plane.

The government had offered Ocean Infinity up to $70million under such a deal doe its search last year.

Mr Loke told reporters at a Kuala Lumpar event marking the fifth year of MH370’s disappearance: “If there are any credible leads or specific proposals, we are more than willing to look at them and we are prepared to discuss with them the new proposals.”

The transport minister said Ocean Infinity had expressed interest in conducting its second search with new technology developed over the past 12 months, but has yet to put forward a fresh proposal.

He added: "If they can convince us that the new technology can be more efficient in terms of the search, then we are more than willing to restart.”

More than 30 pieces of debris thought to be from MH370 have washed up along the Indian Ocean coastline, but just three have so far being confirmed to be from the plane.

At the event on Sunday, two of those pieces were put on display, marking the first time such fragments have been open for public view since MH370’s disappearance.

The parts are currently in the custody of the Malaysian government and include 14-foot long part of a wing found in Tanzania - the largest piece of debris found so far.

Families of the passengers missing expressed hope the public display of the debris would help spur efforts to continue searching for the aircraft.

Grace Nathan, a lawyer whose mother Anne Daisy was a passenger aboard MH370, told Reuters ahead of the event: “Because this piece, which is only a small part of the wing, is very large, it puts into perspective how large the entire plane was.

“To think of it, I can't believe this little piece of the plane travelled thousands and thousands of kilometres through the ocean to Africa over the span of two years.

“I can't help but wonder, where is my mother?”

Today’s event comes after an amateur investigator claimed the claimed the crash site of MH370 is 99 percent likely to have been identified in the Cambodian jungle.

Daniel Boyer believes he found the plane wreckage via satellite images, and sent an expedition team to his proposed coordinates earlier this year.

Although the team failed to reach the spot due to its remote location, its leader Zorba Parer allegedly concluded it was “99 percent likely” to be a plane crash site.

He told Express.co.uk: “Conclusively, Zorba’s report was that due to its remote location kilometres off the nearest dirt road it had to be a plane crash, although his team was not able to safely arrive so he wasn’t able to conclude what specific plane it was.

“He warned me that it could have been another plane crash, not MH370’s, however Cambodian records and satellite images prove otherwise.

“I believe that when you compare a Boeing 777 from the satellite view on an airport tarmac and compare it side by side with the crash site, the colour of the wreckage matches perfectly and some larger parts of the crash site are symmetrical to a Boeing 777.

“If this is indeed a plane crash site as 99 percent chance reported it could only be MH370.

“This is due to the fact that Cambodia’s last plane crash was in 2007 and 2008 satellite images of my crash site at coordinates 12.0159, 104.152 prove the jungle was completely undisturbed.

“What else would cause a disturbance in this vicinity of the jungle where it’s kilometres away from the nearest dirt path, 7m tall, 11m long, symmetrical to a large jetliner and after 2008? MH370.”

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/10 ... ume-search
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Mar 05, 2019 10:02 pm

Google Maps sightings of flight MH370 revealed

ALL the evidence of the doomed plane FLIGHT MH370, the Malaysian Airlines plane, is thought to have come down in the Indian Ocean in 2014.

The five year anniversary of the tragedy is on March 8, and Google Maps theorists have claimed to be able to pinpoint the aircraft in a variety of locations. What is the latest news on MH370 on street view?


Google Maps captures scenes in every corner of the globe - including tragic goings on. A host of individuals, including amateur theorists and geologists, have used the digital mapping tool to speculate the location of Malaysia Airlines’ MH370, which came down in 2014 after travelling from Kuala Lumpur, with an intended destination of Beijing. They have honed in on central Cambodia as a key area. The tragedy left all passengers and crew presumed dead.

Why do geologists think Google Maps proves the plane can be found?

Geologist John Guo believes he knows where the Boeing 777 is, after he pinpointed a 600 metre stretch of ruined trees leading up to a jet that appears on Google Map’s satellite view.

He believes this ‘crush zone’ is also around 45m wide. Mr Guo asserts he is experienced in “remote image interpretations” and believes the clues he has spotted reveal the fate of the plane carrying 227 passengers.

In a video on YouTube, Mr Guo said: “This video shows an obvious crushed aeroplane image identified on Google Maps in Cambodia, first identified by a British video producer.

“The aeroplane object is clear, and the texture information of the forest behind the aeroplane helps me to interpret what could have happened when the aeroplane crushed on ground.”

The Aviation Safety Network - who said the zone does not fit the profile of any crashes in the area - believe the sighting is a plane caught in flight.

An amateur sleuth from Barnsley also claimed he had used Google Maps and Google satellite view to track the plane down to north Malaysia.

How have online sleuths used Google Maps to pinpoint the plane to Cambodia?

Google Map’s satellite imagery of the entire planet was used to pinpoint the location of a potential plane wreckage in central Cambodia. The Google Maps coordinates of 12°05'20"N 104°09'05"E hone in on a section of jungle near the border of Pursat Province and Kampong Speu Province.

The location appears to show an aeroplane surrounded by thick jungle coverage.

The bizarre Google Maps coordinates were discovered in September this year by UK-based video producer Ian Wilson.

Online conspiracy theorists who have since analysed the supposed crash site have labelled the discovery “pretty nuts”.

What has the Malaysian Prime Minister said this week about the search, ahead of the five year anniversary of the tragic event?

Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad promised his country “will continue” looking for the doomed plane.

Two massive search operations have so far combed thousands of miles of ocean but nothing has yet turned up explaining what happened when the Boeing 777 mysteriously lost contact with air traffic control 38 minutes after it took off from Kuala Lumpur.

Military radar was able to continue tracking the plane, which was on its way to Beijing but mystifyingly deviated from its intended flight plan, for another two hours.

All 227 passengers and 12 crew are presumed dead.

Link to Photos:

https://www.express.co.uk/travel/articl ... t-location
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Mar 11, 2019 11:06 pm

Investigator's new theory plane flew towards Kazakhstan

MH370 was flown towards Kazakhstan after Russian hijackers took control of the plane, according to a wild theory put forward by an aviation expert during a documentary

Science journalist and aviation author Jeff Wise claimed during Channel 5’s "Flight MH370: Five Years On” documentary that Russia may be behind an elaborate plot to distract from the Crimea conflict – which was raging at the time.

Mr Wise believed hijackers may have taken control of the plane and flown it to Kazakhstan, a former Soviet country which borders Russia.

He said: "The plane was accelerating, it was climbing and that shows whoever was behind it knew how to fly a plane.

"Whoever was flying the aircraft knew about dead air space in air traffic control, which suggests they were deliberately hiding it from view.

"If this was an effort by Russia it could have put the plane directly on the path to Kazakhstan.

"This happened in the context just after Russia had annexed Crimea and was getting a lot of heat.”

Mr Wise, who graduated Harvard with a degree in evolutionary biology, claims Russia made it look as though the plane was flying above the Indian Ocean but it was actually on its way to Kazakhstan.

He added: “They wanted people to talk about something else and suddenly the world's attention was shifted to this.

“I think the reboot of the flight systems is fishy and I can explain how it is possible to create data that looks like the plane is going into the Indian Ocean, but it is actually going in the opposite direction.

"There could have been a Russian on board who interfered with the systems and created a false trail of breadcrumbs."

However, Mr Wise’s theory was not met with the same enthusiasm with the rest of the experts on the show.

Aviation journalist David Learmount said: "Theories like this are great for James Bond but they make no sense in the real world.

"But it was not an accident – it as carefully planned and then carried out by someone on board.

"If you are someone who wants to do something really clever and you really enjoy flying and the science of flying and you have the idea that the greatest thing would be to baffle the world and then die, then this could explain it."

Three pieces of the wreckage, including a wing flaperon, the iconic “No Step” piece and at least one section of the interior cabin have all also been recovered.

However, integral parts such as the fuselage and the black box have never been found.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/10 ... russia-spt
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:51 pm

Families of Victims Demand New Search

Five years ago, Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared over the Indian Ocean without much of a trace. Only a few wreckage pieces were found floating in the ocean or washed ashore by sea currents hundreds of miles away. A number of relatives who had loved ones aboard flight MH370 now demand a new search for the lost aircraft and its victims

When MH370 took off from Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia on March 8, 2014 everything appeared in place for a routine flight to Chinese capital Beijing. The Boeing 777-200ER with 22 passengers and 12 crew aboard lifted off at 12:40 a.m. without incident. At 1:19 a.m. Captain Ahmad Zahari Shah, a pilot with over 33 years of experience, radioed Malaysian air traffic control with a brief message: “Good night, Malaysia Three-Seven-Oh.”

This would remain the last sign of life from the flight as everything that appeared routine about this flight ended after these 39 minutes. What happened after 1:19 a.m. remains one of aviation’s great mysteries.

With the exception of a few pieces of wreckage washed ashore on different coastlines, there is still no sign of the aircraft. Experts theorize that the 777 continued its flight south for a few hours — off course to the north-eastern route towards Beijing — and now rests somewhere on the bottom of the Indian Ocean. Where exactly and how it got there remains unknown.

Theories on the cause of the disappearance range from lack of fuel to a botched hijacking to being shot down by armed forces to suicide by pilot. The only thing investigators are fairly certain of is that the aircraft manually changed course after the last radio message and that the aircraft fuselage broke apart – either in the air or on impact.

Understandably, this lack of certainty remains difficult, if not impossible, to accept for families and friends of the 239 people that were on board. The official search ended in May 2018, after $145 million had been spent without results.

On the fifth anniversary of the disappearance of MH370, families of the crash victims demand renewed efforts to find the airplane. Grace Nathan, who lost her mother in March 2014 issued a call to action: “We have to prevent something like this from happening again. This is a service Malaysia can provide to the world. It will benefit everyone who flies.”

Governments across the world have since agreed via the global civil aviation authority ICAO to make satellite tracking of passenger aircraft mandatory in 15-minute intervals. In addition, airplanes now have to be equipped with robust and automatic technology allowing the localization of even a heavily damaged aircraft over long periods of time.

While this will be of little consolation to those that lost loved ones on flight MH370, it may help future searched should such a tragedy re-occur.

https://airlinegeeks.com/2019/03/12/fam ... ew-search/
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Mar 20, 2019 1:05 am

MH370 SHOCK: How Captain Zaharie Shah
'suffered mid-air emergency' years before disaster


MH370: Transport Minister says he's open to new technologies

MH370, which had been travelling from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, disappeared on March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board. The Boeing 777 aircraft last communicated with air traffic control at 1.19am when the plane was flying over the South China Sea, before vanishing from civilian radar screens. Mr Shah was in control of the plane that night and has come under scrutiny over the past five years, over claims he may have crashed MH370 on purpose.

However, what many do not know is the 57-year-old reportedly had another flying accident in 2007.

Dirk Jan Barreveld claimed in his book “Air Crash Investigations – The Disappearance of MH370” that Captain Zaharie Shah suffered spinal injuries during what is believed to have been a paragliding accident.

The 2015 book reads: “He had sustained a spinal injury on January 28, 2007, during a paragliding event that is not well known.

“He sustained a fracture of the 2nd lumbar vertebra and underwent surgery on January 30, 2007, in a private healthcare facility.

“He was discharged on February 5, 2007, and went regularly for monthly medical examinations for his continued licence as a pilot.

“For his pain, he was noted to have taken analgesics on an irregular basis and to the best of out knowledge he was not on any regular long-term medication.”

However, despite Mr Barreveld’s claims, there has been some confusion over the true nature of his injury, with others claiming the translation actually reads that Mr Shah fell off a ladder.

Previously, it was claimed Mr Shah made a “final goodbye gesture” during the doomed flight.

Analysis of radar and satellite data showed the plane suddenly changed course and flew back across Malaysia before turning south of Penang and then towards the southern Indian Ocean.

He had sustained a spinal injury on January 28, 2007 during a paragliding event that is not well known

This change of course may have been made deliberately by Mr Shah in an attempt to get a glimpse of his hometown before crashing, it was claimed.

Simon Hardy, a UK aviation expert, revealed to investigators at Australia’s “60 Minutes” his new theory, by running a flight simulation.

He said: “If you look very carefully, you can actually see the plane dips to the left, before starting a long turn to the right, followed by another left turn.

“So I spent a long time thinking about what technical reason there could be for this.

“After three months of thinking, I finally got the answer – someone was looking out of the window.

“It may have been a long-emotion final goodbye or a short goodbye to Mr Shah’s hometown of Penang.”

However, it is just one of the countless theories over what possibly happened to the plane.

Experts also claimed the captain tried to land on the desert island of Pulau Langkawi.

Stranger still, there have also been wild conspiracies that Russians may have hijacked the jet.

Science journalist and aviation author Jeff Wise even went one step further, claiming the plane may have flown towards Kazakhstan.

He said earlier this month: "The plane was accelerating, it was climbing and that shows whoever was behind it knew how to fly a plane.

"Whoever was flying the aircraft knew about dead air space in air traffic control, which suggests they were deliberately hiding it from view.

"If this was an effort by Russia it could have put the plane directly on the path to Kazakhstan.

"This happened in the context just after Russia had annexed Crimea and was getting a lot of heat.”

The hunt for MH370 continues

Mr Wise, who graduated Harvard with a degree in evolutionary biology, claims Russia made it look as if the plane was flying above the Indian Ocean but it was actually on its way to Kazakhstan.

He added: “They wanted people to talk about something else and suddenly the world's attention was shifted to this.

“I think the reboot of the flight systems is fishy and I can explain how it is possible to create data that looks like the plane is going into the Indian Ocean, but it is actually going in the opposite direction.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/11 ... saster-spt
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Mar 20, 2019 1:12 am

DOOMED FLIGHT Ex-Boeing pilot claims missing flight
MH370 flown towards ‘secret runway’ after mid-air hijack


Former United Airlines employee Randy Ryan's new and unproven theory comes after he analysed the doomed jet's final mystery journey

A RETIRED pilot has amazingly claimed missing flight MH370 was flown towards a secret runway following a terrifying mid-air hijack - by one of the crew.

Former United Airlines employee Randy Ryan's new and unproven theory comes after he analysed the doomed jet's bizarre final journey.

He told the Daily Star Online he believes the packed passenger plane was flown to a "pre-planned" location on land or was dumped into the ocean.

And he has fingered pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah as the prime suspect.

He said: "This plane took off and it did the the initial route up to a point. But something took place in that cockpit, somebody had to programme that initial left turn.

"It's a complex airplane so whoever did it, I assume of the two male pilots, he had to know what he was doing.

"In order to get away with that, the other pilot would either have to have been complicit or incapacitated."

The former US Air Force pilot also claimed there’s "zero possibility" the plane's disappearance could be the result of an accident.

The ex-captain, who retired after 33 years as a Boeing 747 pilot, said: "If it turned north and landed I’d expect it would have landed in some desolate place where its approach would not have been noticed, especially at night.

"It’s harder (to find) if it is on land, I’ll bet it was covered with camo cloth by the people I suspect met it on landing."

MH370 - WHAT WE ACTUALLY KNOW

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 took off from Kuala Lumpur and was heading to Beijing with 239 people on board.

Passengers included Chinese calligraphers, a couple on their way home to their young sons after a long-delayed honeymoon and a construction worker who hadn't been home in a year.

But at 12.14am on March 8, 2014, Malaysia Airlines lost contact with MH370 close to Phuket island in the Strait of Malacca.

Before that, Malaysian authorities believe the last words heard from the plane, from either the pilot or co-pilot, was "Good night Malaysian three seven zero".

Satellite "pings" from the aircraft suggest it continued flying for around seven hours when the fuel would have run out.

Experts have calculated the most likely crash site around 1,000 miles west of Perth, Australia.

But a huge search of the seabed failed to find any wreckage - and there are a number of alternative theories as to its fate.

Ryan's allegations come after MH370 pilot Shah was accused of trying to deceive international radar so he could make the plane "disappear.".

The jet vanished en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on 8 March 2014 - sparking one of the world's greatest aviation mysteries.

Some experts have claimed he deliberately crashed the jet in a “suicide mission”, killing all 239 people on board.

And now Victor Iannello, who works for the Independent Group (IG) - which is assisting Australian officials search for the missing plane – is supporting this theory.

In a report that has used civilian radar data, he says that Shah may have used a particular flight path to deceive radar operators into believing the plane was planning to land at Penang Airport.

Mr Iannello created a flight simulation in order to better understand the route taken.

The MH370 flight path was plotted together with two recent Air Hong Kong flights for the route from Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam to Penang in Malaysia.

Mr Iannello believes the findings prove “clearly there was no intention on the part of the pilot to actually perform the procedure and to land.”

He added: “However, it is possible that by flying an element of the course reversal procedure, there was a deliberate attempt to deceive radar operators into believing that MH370 had an intention to land.”

More than 30 bits of aircraft debris have been collected from various places around the world but only three wing fragments that washed up along the Indian Ocean coast have been confirmed to be from MH370.

In July, investigators released a 495-page report, saying the plane's controls were likely deliberately manipulated to take it off course but they were not able to determine who was responsible.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE ODDBALL THEORIES?

Vladimir Putin

Some feared Russian president Vladimir Putin was involved in the hijacking of MH370. US Science writer Jeff Wise claimed Putin "spoofed" the plane's navigation data so it could fly unnoticed into Baikonur Cosmodrome so he could "hurt the West".

US shootout

French ex-airline director Marc Dugain accused the US military of shooting down the plane because they feared it had been hijacked. A book called Flight MH370 – The Mystery also suggested that it had been shot down accidentally by US-Thai joint jet fighters during a military exercise and covered it up.

Suicide

Malaysia police chief Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar suggested the disappearance could have been the result of a suicide. He claimed someone on board could have taken out a large life insurance package before getting on the plane, so they could treat their family or pay back the money they owed.

In hiding?

Historian and writer Norman Davies suggested MH370 could have been remotely hacked and flown to a secret location as a result of sensitive material being carried aboard the jet.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8655635/e ... ir-hijack/
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Re: All Malaysian Flight 370 could be still alive and kickin

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:38 am

Co-pilot tried to use his mobile
phone minutes before plane vanished


The co-pilot for missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370 may have tried to use his mobile phone just minutes before the plane vanished, it has emerged

MH370 disappeared without a trace on March 8 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing carrying 239 people. A report leaked by The Australian suggests co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid used his phone before the Boeing 777 disappeared from radar. A telecommunications tower at Bandar Baru Farlim Penang in Malaysia tracked a mobile number registered to Mr Hamid at this time, the report states according to Sputnik.

Mike Keane, a former chief pilot of the budget airline Easyjet, reportedly linked this new piece of evidence to the theory that pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah intentionally took the plane off course.

Mr Keane suggested Mr Shah may have told his co-pilot to go to the cabin before he locked the cockpit and depressurised the aircraft.

He said: “The first officer would have been skilled in responding to depressurisation due to regular training.

“If Fariq had his mobile phone on him, he would have grabbed an oxygen bottle before taking his phone off flight mode or switching it on.”

The current official theory of the Malaysian government and Australian Transport Safety Bureau is that Mr Shah was unconscious at the end of the journey.

The investigation concluded that the plane was likely flying on autopilot over the Indian Ocean before running out of fuel and crashing.

However, some have speculated that the abduction of the plane was a deliberate move by Mr Shah, who was allegedly unhappy in his marriage.

Others have claimed Mr Shah was unhappy about Anwar Ibrahim, Malaysia’s then opposition leader, being convicted of sodomy, which happened hours before take-off.

However, the pilot’s friends and family have vehemently denied the claims, saying that Mr Shah “loved life” and would never deliberately crash the plane.

Whilst the official MH370 investigation believes the plane is now at the bottom of the Indian Ocean, no wreckage has ever been found.

However, numerous pieces of debris have been found on the west coast of Africa, three of which are confirmed to be from the missing plane.

The answers to the questions of loved ones may well be in the aircraft’s black box, which was sadly never recovered.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/11 ... bdul-hamid
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