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Vile UK army puts down more than 1,000 old working dogs

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Vile UK army puts down more than 1,000 old working dogs

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:13 pm

Army puts down more than 1,000 'old and worn-out' working dogs even though animals proved themselves as heroes in Afghanistan and Iraq

    The British Army uses hundreds of highly trained dogs to sniff out bombs

    When service is over, they are either re-homed or, if dangerous, put down

    Between 2002 and 2017, 1,042 dogs were put down, it has been revealed
More than 1,000 Army dogs have been put down since the start of the Afghanistan War, new figures revealed today.

Furious campaigners are appalled by the figures and are petitioning for greater efforts to re-home dogs after service.

The British Army uses hundreds of highly trained dogs for tasks such as sniffing out bombs or tracking down insurgents.

When their service is over, they are 'de-trained' and re-homed among civilians or handlers - but sometimes they are considered too dangerous and put down.

Between 2002 and 2017, 1,042 dogs were put down, a freedom of information request has revealed.

Paul Farthing, a former Royal Marine who runs a dog re-homing charity Nowzad, described the numbers as 'absolutely horrific'.

He told the Daily Star Sunday: 'Any dogs that worked for the British military to help save lives in the various conflicts around the world, where they have served alongside a human handler, should be given every opportunity to ensure they are provided a decent retirement.

'They had no choice but to be there and protect our soldiers. The least we can do is be there for them.'

One military document seen by The Star described the dogs which are deemed unfit for service.

It said: 'Old and worn out dogs are animals who have reached a certain age (over eight-years-old) and are no longer able to carry out their duties to the requisite standard.

'Many reasons exist but they are accepted to be 'of age' and to continue to use them would be detrimental to the animal, service or perhaps both.'

It also says there are 'animals who are not old (under eight) and are no longer able to carry out their duties to the requisite standard'.

One dog handler told the paper that dogs are not treated compassionately following service and are seen merely as a 'resource.'

An MoD spokesman said: 'Military working animals provide an invaluable service to our troops, and every effort is made to re-home them at the end of their service life.

'Decisions are taken following an extensive assessment of the animals and any potential new home.

'Sadly, there are some occasions where it is not possible to re-home an animal safely.'

Last year the Defence Secretary intervened to stop two Army dogs that saved thousands of lives in Afghanistan from being put down.

Gavin Williamson held urgent talks with dog handlers at the Ministry of Defence following widespread protest against plans to give them lethal injections.

The dogs - Kevin and Dazz - sniffed out explosives on several tours of Helmand province.

They were retired from frontline service four years ago and put in the care of trainers at the Defence Animal Centre in Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire.

Army chiefs had hoped the nine-year-old dogs would be rehomed.

WHAT HAPPENS TO DOGS AFTER THEY SERVE IN THE MILITARY?

Just under 400 military dogs are currently working in the British Army.

They operate with handlers on various operations, including detecting Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), looking for safe routes and buildings and drug-busting tasks.

Many have served in conflicts in Northern Ireland, Afghanistan, Iraq, Kosovo and Bosnia.

When they come to the end of their service they go to a group of highly experienced dog trainers within the Canine Training Squadron.

The job of these trainers is to 'de-train' dogs, to prepare them for possible rehoming into the civilian population.

The trainers use techniques to relax the dogs, and make them understand that they no longer have to work.

They aim to introduce the dogs to 'Civi Street' in a controlled and safe way, continually assessing their suitability for rehoming.

Although not all dogs are suitable for rehoming, many are rehomed with ex-military dog handlers, and many are also rehomed with the general civilian population.

The process of ensuring a dog is suitable for the outside world is very strict, and rigorous procedures are followed to ensure dogs are re-homed wherever possible.

The requirements for being able to rehome a military working dog are strict, and there is a waiting list of applicants wishing to offer them a home.

If at the end of 'de-training' dogs are considered too old, dangerous, 'below standard', ill or unfit, they will be put down.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... a-fallback
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Vile UK army puts down more than 1,000 old working dogs

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Re: Vile UK army puts down more than 1,000 old working dogs

PostAuthor: Piling » Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:06 am

In France many of retired army dogs are adopted by their ex-owners, or they find a new home. I don't know what happens with "unfit" dogs. :sad:
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Re: Vile UK army puts down more than 1,000 old working dogs

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Nov 05, 2018 11:44 am

Piling wrote:In France many of retired army dogs are adopted by their ex-owners, or they find a new home. I don't know what happens with "unfit" dogs. :sad:


Army dogs are often at the forefront of the conflict, being sent in ahead of the humans soldiers to check for mines and armed assailants

These dogs have saved countless lives and many of them have died in the service :((

Suggestion:

Perhaps we should also put down ex-soldiers who are no longer able to function :D

After all, soldiers volunteered to join the army, these poor dogs had no choice

Ergo, soldiers deserve less support than the poor innocent dog :ymhug:
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