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My solution to Black Lives Matter

Discuss about the world's headlines

Re: Slavery: Nazi Germans abducted approximately 12 million

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 08, 2020 1:34 am

BLM protests subverted by thuggery

Boris Johnson said the anti-racism demonstrations had been “subverted by thuggery” following a day of protests across the UK

It came after thousands of protester joined Black Lives Matter demonstrations taking place in cities across the UK on Saturday and Sunday.

Crowds of demonstrators wore face coverings and held placards outside the embassy in Battersea, south-west London, on Sunday, in protest against police brutality following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

While Saturday saw clashes between police and protesters at Whitehall, during which 14 officers injured. Twenty-nine people were arrested.

The statue sits in Parliament Square, Westminster (Getty Images)

“People have a right to protest peacefully & while observing social distancing but they have no right to attack the police,” the Prime Minister tweeted.

“These demonstrations have been subverted by thuggery – and they are a betrayal of the cause they purport to serve.

“Those responsible will be held to account.”

Police tactics have come under criticism after mounted officers charged protesters on Saturday.

During the resulting melee one officer was seriously injured after her horse ran her into a traffic light.

Labour MP Zarah Sultana said: "The videos circulating of police on horseback charging on protestors in London are disturbing.

"It is also unacceptable protestors and legal observers were kettled until 1:30AM.

"This will be seen as an attempt to intimidate and deter legitimate protest."

Similar scenes were not repeated on Sunday, although there were some light skirmishes between police and a minority of protesters.

However, a statue of a 17th Century slave trader was pulled down and dumped in the sea following a march in Bristol.

The bronze memorial to Edward Colston, situated in the city centre since 1895, was torn down after crowds left the city’s College Green and later was dumped into Bristol harbour.

It came after 10,000 people took part in the Black Lives Matter demonstration, which was praised by Avon and Somerset police for being “peaceful and respectful”.

No arrest were made, but officers are now said to be collating footage of a “small group of people” who were filmed pulling down the statue with ropes, which police say amounted to criminal damage.

Meanwhile, the Winston Churchill statue in London was defaced with "was a racist" by a protester.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/bori ... 62136.html
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Re: Slavery: Nazi Germans abducted approximately 12 million

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Re: Slavery: Nazi Germans abducted approximately 12 million

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 08, 2020 7:07 pm

40 New Yorkers shot

NYPD says that 13 New Yorkers were murdered and 40 were shot last week amid George Floyd protest chaos - more than TWICE the amount during the same time last year

    New York Police Department claims sharp spike in violent crime from last week

    NYPD: 13 city residents were murdered - compared to 5 at same time last year

    Police reported 40 shootings in city - compared to 24 in same period last year

    The 40 reported shootings were the most in a seven-day period since 2015

    Monday marked the worst night of looting in NYC with 2,330 burglaries

    Police also reported $750,000 worth of fur stolen from one store
New York is one of scores of cities and localities throughout the country that have been roiled by protests and unrest in recent weeks after the death of Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died in police custody.

The widespread unrest in New York reached its peak last Monday, according to police, when 2,330 stores were burglarized

Many looters are using the protests to not only steal what they can but destroy the properties they steal from

The figure on Monday coincided with the introduction of an 11pm curfew and was about five times the 492 reports from the night before.

Cases quickly dropped again to 306 on Tuesday and after an 8pm curfew was enforced on Wednesday, the NYPD only arrested nine looters out of a total 75 this week.

All but one of the crimes took place in Manhattan.

On Monday, a ring of between 15 and 20 people targeted the city's Henry Cowit store and grabbed an estimated $750,000 worth of fur goods.

The grab was captured on surveillance camera around 10.30pm and a large group was seen climbing over a security barrier once in the store.

At a nearby Rite Aide pharmacy, opportunists also raided $60,000 worth of prescription medication.

Hanaya Jones, 20, was charged with two counts of possession of stolen property after she was caught with $9,000 worth of Dior handbags on Monday, the New York Post reported.

Bronx man Julian Cepeda, 21, was charged with burglary after he was caught inside a Dolce and Gabbana store on Mercer Street wearing a $1,200 shirt and carrying a $435 pair of Chanel sunglasses.

Ashford Adedeji, 21, was charged with criminal possession of stolen property after police found him near Grand and Elizabeth Streets with 'red strappy women's Gucci shoes,' multiple Dolce and Gabbana sneakers, GStar sneakers, Beats headphones and two wrenches.

Police officers force protesters off the street after a fire was lit during an anti-police brutality march in Manhattan last week

Victoria's Secret also seemed to be a popular target; 26-year-old Keona James was caught with lingerie from inside a Midtown branch carrying lingerie.

Cops say that Kristina Williams, 20, punched an officer in the head at the Soho location when he was arresting her.

Not all of the alleged looters were burglary suspects; some are accused of assaulting cops. Dozens more were given desk appearance tickets.

In Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the only case reported outside of Manhattan, four people were arrested after they were caught dashing from the G-Star Raw store with garbage bags containing items.

The suspects smashed into a patrol vehicle at around 4:30am, causing one officer to hurt his knee and leaving another with back pain.

Looting cases have dwindled throughout the week. The NYPD said some of the looters' home addresses were out of state, including in North Carolina and Virginia.

Suspects were aged between 18 to 56 but were mainly in their 20s.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Sunday that the curfew was lifted. Curfews were also lifted in LA and Washington DC.

Despite opportunists looting businesses, peaceful Black Lives Matter protests have continued as American demand equality and justice for black people disadvantages by systematic racism.

Minnesota prosecutors on Wednesday leveled new criminal charges against the four Minneapolis policemen implicated in Floyd’s death.

Chauvin, who was jailed on May 29 on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter, was later charged with second-degree murder.

The added charge, defined under Minnesota law as unintentionally causing another person’s death in the commission of a felony offense, can carry a sentence of up to 40 years, 15 years longer than the maximum sentence for third-degree murder.

Floyd, whom police suspected of trying to pass a counterfeit bill to pay for cigarettes, was pronounced dead at a hospital shortly after the May 25 encounter.

Three fellow officers fired from the Minneapolis police department along with Chauvin the next day were charged on Wednesday - each with aiding and abetting both second-degree murder and manslaughter.

The three men - Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao - have also been taken into custody.

Aiding and abetting second-degree murder carries the same maximum punishment as the underlying offense - 40 years in prison.

Floyd’s death has become the latest flashpoint for long-simmering rage over police brutality against African Americans, propelling the issue of racial justice to the top of the political agenda five months before the US presidential election on November 3.

After an 11pm curfew was enforced Monday, arrested increased five-fold compared to Sunday

The spectacle of city streets flooded with angry though mostly peaceful protesters - punctuated by scenes of arson, looting and clashes with police - have fueled a sense of crisis.

The upheavals have flared following weeks of social lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has forced millions of Americans out of work and disproportionately affected minorities.

More than 10,000 people have been arrested around the country since protests began, according to reports tracked by The Associated Press.

Videos have surfaced of officers in riot gear using tear gas or physical force against even peaceful demonstrators.

But US protests in recent days have been overwhelmingly peaceful - and over the weekend, several police departments appeared to retreat from aggressive tactics.

Several cities have also lifted curfews, including Chicago and New York City, where the governor urged protesters to get tested for the virus and to proceed with caution until they had.

Leaders around the country have expressed concern that demonstrations could lead to an increase in coronavirus cases.

For the first time since protests began in New York more than a week ago, most officers Sunday were not wearing riot helmets as they watched over rallies.

Police moved the barricades at the Trump hotel at Columbus Circle for protesters so they could pass through.

A man is arrested in Soho on Monday. A Rite Aide was raided of $60,000 worth of prescription drugs

Massive group of looters break into the Rolex store in Soho

Officers in some places in the city casually smoked cigars or ate ice cream and pizza. Some officers shook hands and posed for photos with motorcyclists at one rally.

In Compton, California, several thousand protesters, some on horseback, peacefully demonstrated through the city, just south of Los Angeles.

The only law enforcement presence was about a dozen sheriff’s deputies, who watched without engaging.

In Washington, DC, National Guard troops from South Carolina were seen checking out of their hotel Sunday shortly before President Trump tweeted he was giving the order to withdraw them from the nation’s capital.

Things weren’t as peaceful in Seattle, where the mayor and police chief had said they were trying to deescalate tensions.

Police used flash bang devices and pepper spray to disperse protesters after rocks, bottles and explosives were thrown at officers Saturday night.

On Sunday night, a man drove a car at protesters, hit a barricade then exited the vehicle brandishing a pistol, authorities said.

A 27-year-old male was shot and taken to a hospital in stable condition, the Seattle Fire Department said.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... alone.html
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Re: 13 New Yorkers were murdered and 40 shot last week

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 08, 2020 11:13 pm

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Re: 13 New Yorkers were murdered and 40 shot last week

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 09, 2020 1:38 am

US police brutality no
excuse for thuggery in UK


Priti Patel has condemned acts of violence and "vandalism" during Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests in London as the work of “thugs and criminals”

The Home Secretary told the House of Commons that while the majority of demonstrations over the weekend were peaceful, a “lawless minority of protesters have regrettably turned to violence.”

Ms Patel confirmed that 135 arrests had so far been made since thousands of Londoners took to the streets on Saturday and Sunday to march in the name of racial equality.

She said she agreed with "the many peaceful protesters that racism has absolutely no place in our society," adding: "Black lives matter."

But, referring to the killing of George Floyd which sparked widespread unrest, she added: "Police brutality in the United States is no excuse for the violence against our brave police officers at home."

Ms Patel said she “saluted the bravery” of the 35 London police officers injured during the action, adding: “The thugs and criminals responsible are already being brought to justice.”

Some 200 protests took place across the UK over the two days, the Home Secretary confirmed, adding that more than 137,500 people have attended BLM rallies throughout the country.

Referring to those police officers injured during the clashes, Ms Patel added: "As the ugly tally of officer assaults show, some protesters regrettably turned to violence and abusive behaviour at the weekend.

"This hooliganism is utterly indefensible. There is no justification for it."

“There is no excuse for pelting flares at brave officers, throwing bikes at police horses, attempting to disrespect the Cenotaph or vandalising the statue of Winston Churchill, one of the greatest protectors of our freedoms who has ever lived.

“It’s not for mobs to tear down statues and cause criminal damage in our streets, and it is not acceptable for thugs to racially abuse black police officers for doing their jobs.

“The criminals responsible for these unlawful and reckless acts are betraying the very cause they purport to serve.

“These protests are about injustice but by attacking our courageous police, they are acting in a wholly unjust way.”

Thousands join Black Lives Matter protests across UK

Ms Patel described the "thuggish" behaviour of the “criminal minority” as "shameful", as she offered her "full backing" to the police.

She said: “To the quiet law-abiding majority who are appalled by this violence and have continued to live their lives within the rules, I hear you.

“To the police who have been subject to the most dreadful abuse, you have my full backing as you act proportionately, fairly and courageously to maintain law and order.

“To the criminal minority who have subverted this cause with their thuggery, I simply say this – your behaviour is shameful and you will face justice.”

Later during Monday's session in the Commons, Labour MP Florence Eshalomi turned the focus to the BLM cause, rather than the protests themselves.

She called on the Home Secretary to “act now” to resolve the “structural inequality, discrimination and racism” in the UK and prove that black lives matter.

But Ms Patel rejected claims that she or the Government do not understand racial inequality, saying she will “not take lectures” from others when it comes to racism.

Speaking in the Commons, Ms Eshalomi said: “Does the Home Secretary actually understand the anger and frustration felt by so many people?

“Does the Home Secretary recognise that this protest has been led by young people?

“Does the Home Secretary recognise that there is structural inequality, discrimination and racism in our country?

“Does the Home Secretary recognise that people want to see action from this Government?

“My son turned three yesterday, I do not want to have to wait until he’s a teenager before we see changes in this country – will this Government and the Home Secretary act now?

“Black lives matter and we need to see this Government doing something about that.”

In response to Ms Eshalomi, Ms Patel said she was “really saddened” that she had “effectively said that this Government doesn’t understand racial inequality”.

Ms Patel added: “Well, on that basis, it must have been a very different Home Secretary who as a child was frequently called a Paki in the playground, a very different Home Secretary who was racially abused in the streets or even advised to drop her surname and use her husband’s in order to advance her career.

“A different Home Secretary recently characterised, if madam deputy speaker I can say so, in The Guardian newspaper as a fat cow with a ring through its nose – something that was not only racist but offensive, both culturally and religiously.

“This is hardly an example of respect, equality, tolerance or fairness.

“So, when it comes to racism, sexism, tolerance for social justice, I will not take lectures from the other side of the House.

“I have already said repeatedly there is no place for racism in our country or in society, and sadly too many people are too willing, too casual to dismiss the contributions of those who don’t necessarily conform to preconceived views or ideologies about how ethnic minorities should behave or think.

“This, in my view, is racist in itself.”

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/prit ... 63116.html
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Re: Question for BLM: Is King Yellow Black, White or Ginger?

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 09, 2020 3:30 am

I dislike any group/organisation that separates people by colour all lives should matter :x

Where you class King Yellow!?!

Image

Where would BLM class people of mixed race?

What effect does Positive Discrimination have on siblings of different colour?
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 09, 2020 11:29 pm

Clean out the White House

A pastor at George Floyd's funeral called for the White House to be cleaned out

Rev. William 'Bill' Lawson shared powerful remarks at the private service in Floyd's hometown of Houston, demanding that Floyd's death not be a fleeting movement, but a catalyst for real change.

'Is this going to be like so many other movements - a moment of anger and rage and back to business as usual? You could say that because the prejudiced and the bigoted are not going to change. But we can do some things to change them… Obviously the first thing we have to do is to clean out the White House,' Rev. Lawson said as the crowd erupted in applause.

'That has to come closer to us than Washington. Our states and counties and cities have to have good leadership. That means that we have to go and vote,' he added. Lawson helped pioneer the civil rights movement in Houston and founded the Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church in the Third Ward.

Rev. Al Sharpton delivered a stirring sermon, calling out President Donald Trump for focusing more on ending protests than police brutality and blasting the NFL for silencing peaceful protesters like Colin Kaepernick.

About 500 guests including stars like Jamie Foxx, actor Channing Tatum, NFL star J.J. Watt and Congressman Al Green attended the funeral service at the Fountain of Praise Church on Tuesday, the culmination of a long farewell to the man whose death has rocked America and fueled calls for police reform.

Security at the funeral was supplied by the brothers with the Nation of Islam and the Houston police department.

Rev. Lawson says 'we need to clean out the White House'

Rev. William 'Bill' Lawson shared powerful remarks at the private funeral service in Floyd's hometown of Houston, demanding that Floyd's death not be a fleeting movement, but a catalyst for real change saying, 'Obviously the first thing we have to do is to clean out the White House'

George Floyd, 46, was laid to rest in his hometown of Houston today in a private ceremony attended by celebrities like Jamie Foxx, Channing Tatum and NFL star J.J. Watt. Floyd's casket pictured being brought in at the Fountain of Praise church on Tuesday

Floyd's extended family wore white to the special service, many wiping tears from their eyes as the service opened with gospel music and was filled with messages from reverends, poetry readings, and a message from Joe Biden

His niece Brooke Williams, who called him Perry, shared a powerful declaration saying: 'As long as I'm breathing, justice will be served for Perry'

Floyd's relatives gathered on the podium to share remarks to the beloved father, friend, and uncle who was a pillar in the family, all wearing white in celebration of his life

George Floyd's six-year-old daughter pictured holding onto her mother Roxie Washington at Floyd's funeral Tuesday attended by Floyd's family and friends, wrapping up five days of public memorials in Minneapolis, North Carolina and Houston

Standing together: Rev. Al Sharpton called on special guests including Eric Garner's mother Gwen Carr and Trayvon Martin's mother Sybrina Fulton

About 500 guests were invited by the Floyd family, including political leaders and celebrities like actors Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx to the service on Tuesday. Even as the funeral was private hundreds gathered outside the chapel to watch from afar

Houston Texans NFL star J. J. Watt had a moment of silence before Floyd's casket on Tuesday at the emotional service

George Floyd, 46 died on May 25 after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into the back of his neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds in a horrific video that sparked protests across the country

Following the gathering, Floyd's body will be carried home in a horse-drawn carriage and laid to rest next to his mother at the Houston Memorial Gardens in Pearland.

The service began with gospel music and Rev. Sharpton walking down the aisle with Floyd's family's members, all dressed in white to celebrate Floyd's life.

Attendees included Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, Attorney Benjamin Crump, Slim Thug, Leela James, Paul Wall, Floyd Mayweather, Congressman Al Green and Bishop James Dixon, according to KHOU11.

Houston Texans football player JJ Watt, chairman and chief executive officer of the Houston Texans Cal McNair, and Cincinnati Bengals star DJ Reader were also seen at the funeral.

In Rev. Sharpton's opening remarks he asked the family members of Ahmaud Arbery, Pamela Turner, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Botham Jean to stand to uproarious applause from attendees.

'Lives like George will not matter until somebody pays the cost for taking their lives. This was not just a tragedy. It was a crime,' Rev. Sharpton said in his eulogy.

'If four black cops had done to one white what was done to George... they would send them to jail,' he added.

In a clear attack on Trump, Sharpton said: 'You’re sitting there thinking about how to stop the protests rather than how to stop the brutality.

'You’re calling your cabinet in trying to figure out how its going to affect your vote rather than how it’s going to affect our lives. Wickedness in high places.

Biden tells Floyd funeral: 'Now is the time for racial justice'

Presidential hopeful Joe Biden shared a moving video message at the service where he declared, 'Now is the time for racial justice'

'To George’s family and friends: Jill and I know the deep hole in your hearts when you bury a piece of your soul deep in this Earth. As I said to you privately, we know you will never feel again,' Biden said in the video recorded message

'Lives like George will not matter until somebody pays the cost for taking their lives. This was not just a tragedy. It was a crime,' Reverend Al Sharpton said in his powerful eulogy

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas speaks as family and guests attend the funeral service for George Floyd at The Fountain of Praise church saying: 'George Floyd was not expendable. This is why we're here'

At the start of Tuesday's service Revered Dr. Mary White opened with a prayer, referencing Floyd's cry for his mother as he struggled under the knee of White Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin

Singer Ne-Yo performed a heartfelt song for Floyd. He said: '50 states are protesting at the same time. Change the world for the better. So I just personally want to thank George Floyd for his sacrifice so that my kids could be aight. I appreciate the sacrifice my brother'

LaTonya Floyd was overcome with emotion while speaking about her brother George Floyd during the service

Rodney Floyd puts an arm around his brother Philonise Floyd as they listen to the song 'Oh, How Precious' during the funeral

Rev. Al Sharpton, who will deliver the eulogy, entered the Fountain of Praise church in white followed by Floyd's family members

Rev. Sharpton pictured speaking with Quincy Mason Floyd, the son of George Floyd, before the start of the funeral

Security at the funeral was supplied by the brothers with the Nation of Islam and the Houston police department. Members pictured in the back in their trademark suits and red bowties

Members of the Nation of Islam group, which the Southern Poverty Law Center designates as a hate group, pictured back left in black suits and red bow ties

Who are the Nation of Islam ?

The Nation of Islam is an African American political and religious movement that was founded in Detroit, Michigan in 1930 meant to improve the spiritual, mental, social and economic condition of African Americans.

It is designated as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center for its 'theology of innate black superiority over whites', a belief rejected by mainstream Muslims.

The Nation of Islam has grown into one of the wealthiest and best-known organizations in black America.

Members are known to wear trademark suits and red ties.

'You ain't been walking cross that street when the church didn’t have the boards up. You weren’t putting up no Bible when Arbery was killed in Brunswick, when Taylor was killed in Louisville,' he said.

Sharpton touched on the NFL's declaration of support for Black Lives Matter and how quarterback Colin Kaepernick was ostracized from the league after he took a knee in protest of police brutality.

'Oh, its nice to see some people change their minds. Head of the NFL said yeah, maybe we was wrong. Football players, maybe they did have the right to peacefully protest. Don’t apologize, give Colin Kaepernick his job back. Don’t come with some empty apology. Take his livelihood. Strip a man down of his talents,' Sharpton said in his sharp rebuke.

'You sorry? Then repay the damage you did to the career you stood down because when Colin took a knee he took it for the families in this building. We don’t want an apology, we want it repaired,' he added.

He praised attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Floyd's family, as 'black America’s attorney general'.

'Ben Crump has stood and fought for many cases… We should not take for granted when black lawyers take these cases like Crump has. They are targeted by their bar associations. They are targeted by people who are envious and jealous. We need civil rights lawyers who are here for civil rights, not for civil settlements. That’s why I give him recognition,' he said on Crump.

Crump has taken high profile cases including the killing of Ahmaud Arbery and represented the family of Michael Brown in the George Zimmerman case.

The service opened with gospel music as mourners trickled into the chapel to celebrate Floyd's life on Tuesday

Philonise Floyd and his siblings wore customized sneakers displaying their brother's likeness with the message: 'Justice for George Floyd'

George Floyd's family members pictured in white wearing sneakers bearing his image at the moving funeral ceremony

In this nation do too many black Americans wake up knowing they could lose their life in the course of just living their life.

'Now is the time for racial justice. That’s the answer we must give to our children when they ask why. Because when there’s justice for George Floyd we will truly be on the way to racial justice in America. Then as you said Gianna, your daddy will have changed the world.'

Rev. Al Sharpton, right, sits with the family of George Floyd near the casket of Floyd during the funeral service

Zsa Zsa Floyd, George Floyd's sister, raises her hand and places a hand to her heart at the start of the service

Terrance Floyd, brother of George Floyd, pictured arriving to the funeral wearing a face mask with his brother's name on it

Philonise Floyd, George Floyd's brother, pauses at his casket to pay his respects at the Houston funeral

At the start of Tuesday's service Revered Dr. Mary White opened with a prayer, referencing Floyd's cry for his mother as he struggled under the knee of White Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin.

'We thank you for the life of George Floyd, oh God. That at a moment he called out for his mama, we believe that the ears of mamas across this nation reared up. That the ears of mamas across this world heard him cry even though for one mama, all mamas began to wail. We began to wail for our children. We began to wail for our grandchildren. We wail for men across this world because of one mama’s call,' she prayed.

At the funeral it was announced that the President of Ghana would permanently mount George Floyd’s name on a wall at the Diaspora African Forum in the W.E.B. Du Bois Center in Ghana.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner spoke before the attendees at the funeral saying the city attorney is drafting an executive order that bans chokehold in the city of Houston. He says he'll sign that order immediately when he returns to City Hall.

He also proclaimed June 9 to hereby be celebrated as 'George Perry Floyd Day'.

Family members of Floyd and close friends then took to the stage to share stories about Floyd.

His niece Brooke Williams, who called him Perry, shared a powerful declaration saying: 'As long as I'm breathing, justice will be served for Perry.'

Congressman Al Green was pictured wearing a mask and gloves arriving to the funeral at the Fountain of Praise church in Houston

Mourners break down in tears at the casket of Floyd as his extended family enters the chapel on Tuesday

Loved ones were overcome with emotion upon reaching Floyd's casket and sharing their goodbyes at the service

Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez takes a knee before Floyd's casket and bows his head to pay his respects at the service

Mourners pictured sharing a moment of silence at Floyd's casket at the start of the moving funeral service

Members of the Texas Southern University Police Department pause at the casket bearing the remains of George Floyd in the chapel on Tuesday playing their hands to their hearts

Harris County District Attorney Kimm Ogg closed her eyes and paused for a moment at the casket of George Floyd on Tuesday

The first mourners trickled into the chapel and paid their respects at Floyd's casket Tuesday morning

Paying respects: Police officers with the Texas Southern University police saluted the casket of George Floyd as he was brought into the Fountain of Praise Church on Tuesday

Never forgotten: Texas Southern University police officers saluted Floyd's casket as it was brought in the for the funeral

The service for Floyd was held at the Fountain of Praise Church at 11am local time, where family and friends paid their final respects. Following the gathering, Floyd's body will be carried home in a horse-drawn carriage and laid to rest next to his mother at the Houston Memorial Gardens in Pearland

City officials closed the streets within a mile of the cemetery, but supporters can still watch the procession.

On Tuesday morning Minnesota Governor Tim Walz announced a shared moment of silence for his constituents in honor of Floyd saying: 'In honor of the funeral for George Floyd, we ask all Minnesotans to spend 8 minutes and 46 seconds in silence at 11am this morning.'

As of Tuesday morning, fences were placed along Cullen Boulevard to allow people to pay their respect to Floyd. While city officials say they do not know how many people will arrive, they are prepared for a massive crowd.

On Monday more than 6,300 people attended his public viewing ceremony Monday at Fountain of Praise church including political leaders Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson and others.

The funeral services comes after five days of public memorials in Minneapolis, North Carolina and Houston.

On Monday, under a blazing Texas sun, mourners wearing T-shirts with Floyd's picture or the words 'I Can't Breathe' - one of the other things he cried out repeatedly while pinned down by the police officer - waited for hours to pay their respects.

Floyd's body, dressed in a brown suit, lay in an open gold-colored casket. Shortly after the memorial ended, Floyd's casket was placed in a hearse and escorted by police back to a funeral home.

As the hearse drove away, 39-year-old Daniel Osarobo, a Houston resident who immigrated from Nigeria, could be heard saying, 'Rest in power. Rest In Peace.'

'I've been stopped by police. I understand the situation. I can only imagine,' Osarobo, who works as an engineer in the oil and gas industry said. 'What if it was me? What if it was my brother? What if it was my sister? What if it was my son?'

Those were questions many black Americans have asked not just in recent weeks, but for decades.

Floyd's death sparked international protests and drew new attention to the treatment of African Americans in the U.S. by police and the criminal justice system.

In the past two weeks, sweeping and previously unthinkable things have taken place: Confederate statues have been toppled, police departments around America have rethought the way they patrol minority neighborhoods, legislatures have debated use-of-force policies, and white, black and brown people have had uncomfortable, sometimes heated, discussions about race in a nation that is supposed to ensure equal opportunity for all.

Calls for 'defunding the police' have cropped up in many communities, and people around the world have taken to the streets in solidarity, saying that reforms and dialogue must not stop with Floyd's funeral.

Floyd's casket seen being placed in the chapel as bystander's watch on at Tuesday's funeral service

His gold casket pictured being set up for the funeral service at the Fountain of Praise Church service. On Monday more than 6,300 people attended his public viewing ceremony Monday at Fountain of Praise church including political leaders Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson and others

The hearse carrying the coffin pictured when it first arrived to the church for Floyd'a funeral service on Tuesday

His death has also reshaped the presidential race. To be re-elected, President Donald Trump must rebound from one of the lowest points of his presidency, with recent polls showing that 8 in 10 Americans believe the country is headed in the wrong direction and even spiraling out of control.

The president got a boost late last week with a better-than-expected jobs report, but he's struggling to show consistent leadership on multiple fronts, including the nationwide protests against police brutality.

Members of the New Black Panther Party pictured attending the funeral for George Floyd, standing outside of the chapel

On Monday Abbott raised the idea of starting a George Floyd Act saying, 'I’m here to tell you today that I am committed to working with the family of George Floyd, to ensure we never have anything like this ever occur in the state of Texas.'

The memorials have drawn the families of black victims in other high-profile killings whose names have become seared into America's conversations on race - among them Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Ahmaud Arbery and Trayvon Martin.

'It just hurts,' Philonise Floyd, George Floyd's brother, said sobbing as he ticked off some of their names outside The Fountain of Praise church. 'We will get justice. We will get it. We will not let this door close.'

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... uried.html
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 09, 2020 11:33 pm

George Floyd was killed in America by racist police

This is a fact and very sad especially for his family and friends

Sadly his funeral appears to have turned into a spectacular farce

It is a shame that when he lost his job, members of the church failed to support him and his family

Fortunately, we do not have that sort of racism in the UK

Black Lives Matter supporters compile a hit list of 60 UK 'racist statues' they want pulling down as local authorities race to have slave trader landmarks removed

In the UK BLM have become a joke

Is it their intention to destroy everything that was made with the help of slaves

Including the White House and the Pyramids!?!

Remember the main cause of young black male deaths in both the US and UK, is other young black males
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 10, 2020 3:08 am

Chicago has deadliest
day of violence


Chicago saw its deadliest day in at least 30 years last month, with 18 killings within a 24-hour period on 31 May

The violence occurred as protests over George Floyd's death in Minneapolis also spurred rioting and looting in the Windy City.

Over the last weekend in May - a three day holiday - 85 people were shot and 24 killed, according to the University of Chicago Crime Lab.

Most of the victims were black.

The dead and injured include students, parents and middle-aged workers, according to the data provided to the Chicago Sun-Times.

"We've never seen anything like it, at all," senior research director Max Kapustin told the newspaper, noting that the Crime Lab's data only goes back as far as 1961.

"I don't even know how to put it into context," he said. "It's beyond anything that we've ever seen before."

Mr Kapustin added that protests over Mr Floyd's 25 May death in police custody may have distracted Chicago Police Department (CPD) resources from normal patrol duties.

"When CPD has to turn its attention elsewhere and there's suddenly this vacuum that opens up, you also unfortunately see a picture like you saw with [last] weekend where you see an absurd amount of carnage, people getting injured and killed," he said.

The second deadliest day in the city's history was 4 August 1991, when 13 people were killed, according to the data.

Researchers tell BBC News that 31 May could be the deadliest day in as many as 60 years, but caution that data from before 1991 is less accurate than the digital data that came afterwards.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot said that on 31 May, the city's 911 emergency call centre received 65,000 calls - 50,000 more than on an average day.

Police told the Sun-Times: "The level of activity experienced over the last week has been unprecedented and the Department is actively investigating multiple incidents across the city and working to determine the motives in these cases."

It added that it "is actively working to seek justice for all the residents impacted, especially those who have been killed or injured by these senseless acts of violence".

Angelo Bronson, a 36-year-old father of two, was shot in the Englewood neighbourhood while in town from Washington DC to see family.

John Tiggs, a 32-year-old father of three, was on his way to a cell phone store to pay his bill when he was killed, family say.

University students Lazarra Daniels and Keishanay Bolden - both 18-years-old - were also among Sunday's victims.

Chicago's murder rate, though among the highest in US cities, has fallen in recent times. In the 1990s, it was not unusual for the city to see more than 900 murders in a year.

In 2018, Chicago recorded 561 murders, more than the two biggest US cities - New York and Los Angeles - combined.

In 2019, there were 492 murders recorded.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-52984535
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 10, 2020 1:36 pm

BLM want to pull down Thomas Guy's statue

Then naturally they must also destroy the other great memorial that stand in his name

EXCELLENT PLAN :ymapplause:

Throw all the patients out and tear down Guy's hospital

And while they are at it, surely they must destroy all the THOUSANDS of medical procedures and cures invented in Guy's hospital
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 10, 2020 1:54 pm

Gone with the Wind removed

Vivien Leigh and Hattie McDaniel both won Oscars for their work in the film

Gone with the Wind has been taken off HBO Max following calls for it to be removed from the US streaming service.

HBO Max said the 1939 film was "a product of its time" and depicted "ethnic and racial prejudices" that "were wrong then and are wrong today".

Set during and after the American Civil War, Gone with the Wind has long been attacked for its depiction of slavery.

Based on the novel by Margaret Mitchell, it features slave characters who seem contented with their lot and who remain loyal to their former owners after slavery's abolition.

Gone with the Wind received 10 Oscars and remains the highest-grossing movie of all time when its takings are adjusted for inflation

Hattie McDaniel became the first black actress to be nominated for, and win, an Academy Award for her role as domestic servant Mammy.

Writing in the Los Angeles Times this week, screenwriter John Ridley said the film "glorifies the antebellum south" and perpetuated "painful stereotypes of people of colour".

"The movie had the very best talents in Hollywood at that time working together to sentimentalise a history that never was," continued the Oscar-winning screenwriter of 12 Years A Slave.

In a statement, HBO Max said it would be "irresponsible" to keep the film on its platform without "an explanation and a denouncement" of its "racist depictions".

It said the film itself would return "as it was originally created", saying "to do otherwise would be the same as claiming these prejudices never existed".

The wording of the statement is similar to advisories that accompany Tom and Jerry cartoons and other vintage animations on various streaming services.

Disney+ also advises its subscribers that some of its older films - among them 1941 animation Dumbo - "may contain outdated cultural depictions".

HBO Max's move comes amid mass protests against racism and police brutality that have prompted several television networks to reassess their offerings.

It follows the removal of Little Britain from Netflix, BritBox and BBC iPlayer. The show saw Matt Lucas and David Walliams play characters from different ethnic backgrounds, including Desiree DeVere - a woman played by Walliams in full blackface.

This must mean that ALL the films that depict ethnic minorities in an unfavourable light must be removed

Many film characters are played by actors being imported from other countries, rather than local indigenous people - surely these must all be banned

Ban the film Black Panther

The film is set in Africa, although basically only establishing shots were filmed there; Much of the principal photography of Black Panther was shot in Atlanta and South Korea
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 10, 2020 2:06 pm

As BLM and their supporters appear to have no interest in saving the YAZIDIS or any other modern day slaves

And are only concentrating on past historical wrongs, then logic would require them to right the worst ever act of racism and slaughter meted out on a minority group

Are BLM are going to:

GIVE NATIVE AMERICANS THEIR LAND
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:27 pm

BLM has become a completely ludicrous organisation

If BLM cares about slavery it should focus on modern slavery

The 3,000 or more Yazidis being held as slaves

The many people being held as slaves in Africa

The many people being held as slaves by Muslims

The slave labour and bad treatment of unregistered servants in many affluent US homes

The sex slaves heavily drugged and forced to work in brothels

The sex workers controlled by violent pimps/gangs

The factory workers who work for pennies, while living in slums, to provide clothes

Do you drink coffee or tea?

If YES then you are supporting exploitation and modern day slavery of plantation workers

Make ALL manufacturers state how much money they pay their lowest paid workers workers
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 11, 2020 9:00 pm

I AM FURIOUS

Guy's hospital in London remove statues of their benefactor

Internationally-renowned Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital in London announced it will remove the statue of its slave-trading founder Thomas Guy following pressure from Black Lives Matter protesters.

The hospital - where Boris Johnson received treatment for coronavirus in April - today revealed on Twitter that the contentious monument is the next in a string of statues taken down over links to Britain's historic slave trade.

Bookseller Guy made his fortune as a major shareholder in British slave-trafficking firm South Sea Company. He sold his shares for £250,00 - the equivalent of £400million in modern-day prices - and founded the hospital in 1721.

A second statue depicting Robert Clayton will also be taken down, the hospital announced. Clayton was part of the Royal African Company who shipped African slaves to the Americas.

A statement posted on Twitter read: 'Like many organisations in Britain, we know that we have a duty to address the legacy of colonialism, racism and slavery in our work.

'We absolutely recognise the public hurt and anger that is generated by the symbolism of public statues of historical figures associated with the slave trade in some way.

'We see the pervasive and harmful effects of structural racism every day through our work. Black people have worse health outcomes, and this inequality is one of many ways racism permeates our society.

'We have therefore decided to remove statues of Robert Clayton and Thomas Guy from public view, and we look forward to engaging with and receiving guidance from the Mayor of London's Commission on each.

'We are fully committed to tackling racism, discrimination and inequality, and we stand in solidarity with our patients, students, colleagues and communities.'

Robert Clayton was part of the Royal African Company who shipped African slaves to the Americas. His statue can also be seen in St Thomas Hospital

The hospital - where Boris Johnson received treatment for coronavirus in April - revealed that the contentious statue of Thomas Guy would be removed from view following pressure from anti-racist protesters

Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital in London today revealed on Twitter that the contentious monument depicting its founder is the next in a string of statues taken down over links to the slave trade

Who was Thomas Guy?

Thomas Guy (1644 - 1724) was a British bookseller, stock speculator, governor of St Thomas' Hospital and founder of Guys' Hospital, London - which he built with profits from the slave trade.

Obviously the hospital should be knocked down :ymdevil:

He made his fortune through ownership of £42,000-worth of shares in the South Sea Company, whose main purpose was to sell slaves to the Spanish colonies.

The South Sea Company was responsible for the transportation of around 64,000 enslaved Africans between 1715 and 1731 to Spanish plantations in Central and Southern America.

Spain must be the next target

Everyone who holidays in Spain has supported slavery


After selling his shares in South Sea Company for £250,000, the equivalent of £400million in modern-day prices, Guy used his massive fortune to establish Guy's Hospital for 'the poorest and sickest of the poor' in London.

Before opening Guy's, in Southwark, central London, he created almshouses and became a governor of the nearby St Thomas's Hospital after paying for the cost of three new wards.

He died in 1724 and his will was so complex and so high in value that an Act of Parliament was needed to enact it, and he left nearly £220,000 to the hospital.

The bulk of his estate was left in trust to complete work on the hospital, while a further sum was set aside for the release of prisoners in the capital who owed debts.
............................................................................................................................
It comes as road names and graves were covered up and plaques torn down across the UK today as Britons inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement took matters into their own hands to eradicate local ties and references to the nation's history of slave trading.

Paint was thrown at a statue of Admiral Lord Nelson at Deptford Town Hall in South East London, while the gravestone of music hall singer GH Elliott who sang in blackface was covered up in Rottingdean, East Sussex.

Meanwhile residents on Colston Road in Bristol have taped over their street sign and have put a suggestion box for new names underneath, four days after a statue of slave trader Edward Colston was toppled in the city.

Elsewhere, National Trust bosses said they will review a statue of a kneeling African figure clad in leaves carrying the sundial above his head which stands in front of Dunham Massey Hall in Altrincham, Greater Manchester.

And in South Wales, a plaque honouring the memory of 17th century slave trader Captain Thomas Phillips in Brecon has been taken down by an unknown person, with the council saying it had been under review at the time.

Scores of statues and memorials could be removed and public buildings, pubs and streets renamed after days of Black Lives Matter protests since black man George Floyd died in police custody in Minnesota on May 25.

Campaigners linked to the anti-racism movement have called for 92 statues, roads or other monuments which they deem racist to be toppled - with a full list being compiled on the website http://www.toppletheracists.org.

The Nelson statue at Deptford Town Hall had streaks of red paint either side of it today, with protesters targeting the naval hero over claims that he was a white supremacist and was against the abolition of slavery.

This week also saw:

    A plaque commemorating 17th slave century trader Captain Thomas Phillips has been removed from Brecon in South Wales;

    The statue of Edward Colston, which was toppled on Sunday and sparked the campaign, has been dragged from Bristol harbour;

    Oxford University's vice-chancellor Prof Louise Richardson has claimed Nelson Mandela would not have taken a 'simplistic solution to a complex problem' like removing Cecil Rhodes' statue from Oriel College;

    ITV's Saturday Night Takeaway latest TV show to be removed and hosts Ant and Dec issue apology for 'impersonating people of colour' as footage of those sketches are taken down;

    In America Donald Trump has refused to rename Army bases linked to the Confederacy as Richmond' Virginia's statues of Jefferson Davis - former president of the Confederacy - is ripped down overnight
Paint-spattered statue of Horatio Nelson at Deptford Town Hall in South East London is

Residents on Colston Road in Bristol have taped over their sign and put a suggestion box for new names underneath today

The gravestone of music hall singer GH Elliott has been covered up outside St Margaret's Church in Rottingdean, East Sussex

National Trust bosses said they will review a statue of a kneeling African figure clad in leaves carrying the sundial above his head which stands in front of Dunham Massey Hall in Altrincham, Greater Manchester (file picture)

The grave of GH Elliott who performed in blackface has been covered up in Sussex. He performed on stage in the early 1900s under the persona of the 'Chocolate Coloured C**n' - now a highly offensive racial slur.

Meanwhile Harry Enfield sparked outrage by mentioning the performer's controversial stage name live on BBC Radio 4 today while defending his own use of blackface after impersonating Nelson Mandela on his sketch show.

The comedian's comments came after Ant and Dec apologised for using blackface during a segment on Saturday Night Takeaway. Little Britain has also been removed from BBC iPlayer over the use of blackface in some sketches.

A 'hit list' of statues and memorials to some of Britain's most famous figures has been created by an anti-racism group

The statue of Edward Colston is pulled out of the harbour by Bristol City Council today after it was rolled in on Sunday

Last week, comedian Leigh Francis issued a tearful apology for portraying black celebrities on sketch show Bo' Selecta. Netflix has also pulled The Mighty Boosh and League Of Gentleman over their use of blackface.

The 78 'racist' statues BLM supporters would like to be destroyed

    Lord Kitchener, Orkney
    Duke of Sutherland, Golspie
    Jim Crow, Dunoon
    Henry Dundas, Comrie
    George Kinloch, Dundee
    Henry Dundas, Edinburgh
    Lord Roberts, Glasgow
    Thomas Carlyle, Glasgow
    Sir Robert Peel, Glasgow
    Colin Campbell, Glasgow
    John Moore, Glasgow
    James George Smith Neill, Ayr
    William Armstrong, Newcastle
    Captain James Cook, Great Ayton
    Robert Peel, Bradford
    Robert Peel, Leeds
    Robert Peel, Preston
    Robert Peel, Bury
    Robert Peel, Manchester
    Bryan Blundell, Liverpool
    Christopher Columbus, Liverpool
    Martin's Bank, Liverpool
    Admiral Nelson, Liverpool
    William Ewart Gladstone, Liverpool
    Banastre Tarleton, Liverpool
    William Leverhulme, Wirral
    Henry Morton Stanley, St Asaph
    Henry Morton Stanley, Denbigh
    William Gladstone, Hawarden
    Elihu Yale, Wrexham
    Green Man, Ashbourne
    The Black Boy, Retford
    Robert Clive, Shropshire
    Robert Peel, Tamworth
    Robert Peel, Birmingham
    Ronald A Fisher, Cambridge
    Cecil Rhodes, Bishops Stortford
    Admiral Nelson, Norwich
    Admiral Nelson, Great Yarmouth
    Thomas Phillips, Brecon
    General Nott, Carmarthen
    Thomas Picton, Carmarthen
    Henry Austin Bruce, Cardiff
    Thomas Picton, Cardiff
    De la Beche family, Swansea
    Codrington Library, Oxford
    Cecil Rhodes, Oxford
    Edward Colston (school 1), Bristol
    Edward Colston (school 2), Bristol
    Edward Colston (statue), Bristol
    Edward Colston (tower), Bristol
    Edward Colston (hall), Bristol
    George Alfred Wills, Bristol
    Merchant Venturers Building, Bristol
    William Beckford, London
    Robert Geffrye, London
    Francis Galton, London
    King Charles II, London
    King James II, London
    Robert Clive, London
    Oliver Cromwell, London
    Robert Clayton, London
    Henry De la Beche, London
    Christopher Columbus, London
    Thomas Guy (1/2), London
    Thomas Guy (2/2), London
    Robert Milligan, London
    Francis Drake, London
    Robert Blake, London
    Admiral Nelson, London
    Captain Edward August Lendy, London
    East India Estate, London
    Stephen Clark, London
    Charles James Napier, London
    Earl Mountbatten, London
    Jan Smuts, London
    Admiral Horatio Nelson, London
    William Lever, London
    Edward Colston, London
    Lord Kitchener, Chatham
    Edward Codrington, Brighton
    William Ewart Gladstone, Brighton
    George Somers, Lyme Regis
    Drax family, Wareham
    Robert Baden-Powell, Poole
    Redvers Buller, Exeter
    John Colleton, Exmouth
    William Beckford, Salisbury
    Francis Drake, Tavistock
    Walter Raleigh, Bodmin
    Nancy Astor, Plymouth
    Francis Drake, Plymouth
In Bristol, residents 'embarrassed' by their road's link to Colston have revived a campaign to get it renamed.

Blue tape has been plastered over the Colston Road sign in Easton, and a suggestion box has been installed below asking for new name ideas.

Residents initially raised concerns in 2018, when former city councillor Abdul Malik penned a petition calling for a name change.

Businessman Mr Malik, who is also chairman of Easton Jamia Mosque, has lived on Colston Road his whole life and said he still supports the campaign.

He said: 'Bristol is a city of inclusion - a city that provides sanctuary for refugees and asylum seekers.

'[But] when you drive around Bristol, it's quite embarrassing to see places like Blackboy Hill and Whiteladies Road, and Colston being celebrated.

'Times have changed, and what was seen to be acceptable and normal at one time can't be seen to be acceptable at this time.

'Easton is diverse and inclusive and I think it makes sense to rename that particular road to something that encapsulates that, rather than Mr Colston.'

He said residents were divided in 2018 and there was not much support for the petition, but he feels now is 'a good time to have the conversation'.

But he admitted it could be 'quite a nightmare' to go through the process of getting a name change, which would require cooperation from Bristol City Council.

Most authorities also charge several hundred pounds to rename a street and install new signs.

Big Jeff Boulevard, Massive Attack Mile and Streety McStreetface Street were among the ideas posted online, when a photo of the suggestion box was posted on Reddit this week.

The more thoughtful Stephenson Road was also thrown into the hat, likely referring to civil rights campaigner Paul Stephenson.

Colston Road resident Dan Stone, who installed the new suggestion box, said discussions were still at an early stage but there had been about a dozen contenders put forward so far.

Asked why some people wanted it renamed, he said: 'Who wants to live in a street named after a slave trader? This is a multicultural area, we like that about it. It [the slave trade] is not something we want to celebrate.'

It comes as the statue of Colston that was toppled during an anti-racism demonstration in Bristol has been lifted out of the city's harbour after being rolled into the water by protesters.

Bristol City Council posted a video clip on Twitter of the statue being fished out of the water this morning.

It tweeted: 'Early this morning we retrieved the statue of Colston from Bristol Harbour. It is being taken to a secure location before later forming part of our museums collection.'

Bristol's mayor Marvin Rees had previously confirmed the statue would be exhibited in a museum, alongside placards from the Black Lives Matter protest.

A decision on how the statue's empty plinth will be used will be decided through democratic consultation, he said. The statue was pulled down on Sunday amid worldwide protests triggered by the death of George Floyd.

The statue's retrieval comes after a senior Labour MP said its forced removal was the result of years of frustration with the democratic process.

Speaking on ITV's Peston yesterday, shadow foreign secretary Lisa Nandy said people decided to take action over the memorial because they felt their voices on racial issues were not being heard.

She said: 'Why was that statue removed in the way that it was removed?

'Because for 20 years, protesters and campaigners had used every democratic lever at their disposal, petitions, meetings, protests, trying to get elected politicians to act, and they couldn't reach a consensus and they couldn't get anything done.

'Now this is reflective of what has happened to people of colour in this country and across the world for a very long time. We've had seven reviews into racial discrimination in this country in the last three years alone, and very few of those recommendations have been acted on.

'That is why people are so frustrated, and that's the question we should be asking ourselves, is why is it so difficult for so many people to actually be heard and to pull the democratic leaders to get the democratic change that they need?'

As for the statue at Dunham Massey, a woman called Naomi Bea wrote on the stately home's National Trust Facebook page and attached a picture of the statue.

She said: 'Hi, with recent events this image has come to light in your grounds. I was wondering if you are taking the same initiative as London by reviewing your offensive statues in National Trust spaces? Thank you.'

In response, Dunham Massey National Trust wrote: 'Hello Naomi, thanks for getting in touch about this. The National Trust looks after places and collections that are linked to world histories in so many ways including the legacies of colonialism and slavery.

Rover Scouts Chris Arthur and Matthew Trott pose in front of a statue of Lord Baden-Powell at Poole in Dorset today

Small crowd gathers in Poole to protest Baden-Powell statue removal

'We have a long way to go but we're working to tackle the often painful and challenging histories attached to our places and collections through interpretation and exploration. In relation to this statue, we are currently reviewing it and we should be able to give you more information shortly.

Sir Thomas Picton's descendant says he's 'embarrassed' by his links to slave-killing 'Tyrant of Trinidad' and Cardiff statue should come down

Descendants of British historical figures were today split over whether statues and memorials to be removed from UK town centres over their links to slavery.

A relative of Waterloo hero Sir Thomas Picton has called for his statue to be removed and put into a museum, saying he was 'rather embarrassed' to be a descendant.

But those with family links to Admiral Lord Nelson, Robert Clive and Henry Dundas have all hit back against calls for monuments of their descendants to be taken down.

Public buildings, pubs and streets are also facing being renamed after days of Black Lives Matter protests over the death of George Floyd in Minnesota on May 25.

Picton descendant Aled Thomas, 28, is the nine-times great grandfather of the Napoleonic Wars hero who was also known as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad'.

A marble statue of Picton stands in Cardiff City Hall, but Mr Thomas has written to council leaders to join calls led by the city's Lord Mayor for it to be taken down.

Picton was the highest-ranking British officer killed at Waterloo after the Duke of Wellington called him 'a rough foul-mouthed devil' but 'very capable'.

His statue has stood in the Welsh capital for more than 100 years even though he was involved in the trade and executed dozens of slaves during his time as Governor of Trinidad, and authorised the torture of a 14-year-old girl.

In a letter to the council, Mr Thomas said: 'While I am related to the Picton family, I do not defend the cruelty that Sir Thomas Picton caused.

'In fact, I feel rather embarrassed to admit I am related to him. We cannot help where we are from and who we are descended from. Also, we cannot change what has happened in the past. But what we can do is learn from them.'

'We recognise the need to explore the contested stories behind places. It is crucial we do it in a high-quality, properly researched way, and in a way that is respectful and sensitive.

'We have no wish to remain silent on this and are grateful to you for sharing your views.'

Ms Bea added: 'Thank you for your response. I appreciate it is a delicate matter to remove these offensive and quite upsetting features, while still preserving history. This particular statue is deeply upsetting for some people.

'At least you are not dismissing the issue and working towards what is fair and respectful to others.'

The life-size lead statue was created by 18th century sculptor Andrew Carpenter as part of a series representing the world's continents.

In Dorset, local residents have vowed to fight to protect a statue of Robert Baden-Powell which is set to be removed temporarily for its protection after it was placed on a target list by protesters.

The statue of the founder of the Scout Movement in Poole Quay has been targeted by campaigners due to his associations with the Nazis and the Hitler youth programme, as well as his actions in the military.

Vikki Slade, leader of Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council, tweeted the decision to remove it was taken following a 'threat', adding: 'It's literally less than 3m from the sea so is at huge risk.'

A crowd of local residents gathered around the statue today, vowing to protect it and to stop the council from removing it.

Mark Howell, the local authority's deputy leader, said the statue would only be removed to protect it.

He added that this would be with the aim of it permanently remaining in its position overlooking Brownsea Island where Baden-Powell held his first experimental camp in 1907.

He said the final decision to temporarily take it down had not yet been made.

He said: 'We are considering whether we should remove it temporarily to protect the statue.

'In terms of its long-term future, this statue stays here, Baden-Powell did an enormous amount of good, he created an organisation that brought people from different religions, ethnic backgrounds and races together and we are very proud of that in Poole and our connection to him :ymapplause:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... actor.html

None of the above has anything to do with the shameful killing of George Floyd in the US

Or the sad fact that most young black men who die violently are killed by other black men

Or even the slavery taking place in this current year 2020

They should help to free the 3,000 Yazidi slaves still missing

Help those still bearing scares of torture and slavery
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jun 12, 2020 12:17 am

Black Lives Matter protest:

Security to guard statue of Scouts founder Lord Baden-Powell overnight

The statue of Scouts founder Robert Baden-Powell will not be removed on Thursday and will receive 24-hour security in the meantime, the local council has said.

Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council had said it planned to temporarily remove the structure of Robert Baden-Powell from Poole Quay citing that it was at "a huge risk" of being targeted by Black Lives Matters demonstrators because it was close to the sea .

Cllr Mark Howell, deputy leader of Bournemouth, Christchurch & Poole Council, described the statue as "much-loved" and said it had been at risk of damage or destruction.

"We know that local people feel proud of Lord Baden-Powell's and the Scout movement's links with Poole, and that some people feel that we would be giving in to the protesters by temporarily removing the statue," Cllr Howell said.

"However, we feel it is responsible to protect it for future generations to enjoy and respect.

"We will not be removing the statue today as the foundations are deeper than originally envisaged and we need further discussions with contractors on the best way to remove it safely.

"Although we cannot say when any temporary removal may take place, we will be providing 24-hour security until it is either removed or the threat diminishes.

"Should the statue be removed temporarily, barring unforeseen circumstances we will return it to the Quay as soon as the threat level subsides."

The council said earlier that it wanted to "minimise the risk of any public disorder or anti-social behaviour that could arise were the statue to remain in situ" while views on Lord Baden-Powell are shared.

Council leader Vikki Slade said in a statement issued on Wednesday: "Whilst famed for the creation of the Scouts, we also recognise that there are some aspects of Robert Baden-Powell's life that are considered less worthy of commemoration.

"Therefore, we are removing the statue so that we can properly involve all relevant communities and groups in discussions about its future, including whether a more educational presentation of his life in a different setting might be more appropriate."

Ms Slade said on Twitter that the decision was taken following a "threat", adding: "It's literally less than three metres from the sea so is at huge risk."

The statue was installed in 2008 and faces Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour, where the Scout movement was started by Lord Baden-Powell.

The council said it would be "put into safe storage" and that Dorset County Scouts "have been advised and support the position".

A spokesman for the Scouts said the organisation was aware that the statue was being removed.

"We look forward to discussing this matter with Poole Council to make an informed decision on what happens next," he said.

"Baden Powell was the founder of the Scout movement. Currently there are over 54 million scouts in the world and we operate in almost every nation on earth promoting tolerance and global solidarity.

"The Scout movement is resolute in its commitment to inclusion and diversity and members continually reflect and challenge ourselves in how we live our values."

In 2010, declassified MI5 files revealed that Lord Baden-Powell was invited to meet Adolf Hitler after holding friendly talks about forming closer ties with the Hitler Youth.

Writing on Twitter, Tobias Ellwood, Tory MP for Bournemouth East, appeared to criticise the way in which the statue removal decision was reached.

He tweeted: "A wider overdue national debate has begun about who we were, who we are & where we should go.

"Few historical figures comply with 21st C values. Simply expunging past connections from sight won't correct wrongs or help us better learn from our past."

Sir Robert Syms, Conservative MP for Poole, tweeted that he was "opposed" to the permanent removal of the statue.

The Tory MP for Bournemouth West, Conor Burns, tweeted that the removal was "a huge error of judgment" and urged authorities to "put it back".

Meanwhile an online petition to "defend Poole's Lord Baden-Powell statue" has received more than 3,500 signatures.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/0 ... s-founder/
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Re: BLM has gone from the sublime to the ridiculous

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jun 12, 2020 1:13 am

Violence at anti-racism protests

Police forces will take strong steps to stop violent disorder at protests after more than 60 officers were injured in anti-racism demonstrations, chiefs have warned

Demonstrators clashed with officers in London last weekend, while in Bristol a statue of slave trader Edward Colston was torn down and dumped in the city’s harbour.

A total of 62 UK officers have been “injured in one way or another” in protests triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25, the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) said.

Mr Floyd, an unarmed black man, died after police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes.

Essex Police Chief Constable Ben-Julian Harrington said more than 155,000 people across the UK had taken part in almost 200 demonstrations.

Some 137 people have been arrested, while others have been fined for breaching coronavirus lockdown rules, which ban gatherings of more than six people.

Mr Harrington said: “We will not tolerate violence in our communities, whether that’s against people, whether it’s against property or, indeed, against police officers, and if this kind of disorder occurs, we will act.

“It’s unacceptable that so many officers were injured in London over the weekend. And I think any criminality will be thoroughly investigated and action will be taken against those who commit offences.”

The Colston monument has been lifted out of Bristol Harbour and is expected to be put in a museum , while activists have drawn up a list of other statues they want to see removed.

NPCC chairman Martin Hewitt said anyone who damages a monument or pulls down a statue is committing a criminal offence and police “will seek to bring people to justice”.

But he added: “It’s not a matter for the police, unless a criminal offence is committed, this is a matter for those people that own or are the guardians of the statues wherever they may be, and dealing with those people who feel very strongly about appropriateness or otherwise of those statues.”

Home Secretary Priti Patel is reported to have had a “firm” discussion with Avon and Somerset Chief Constable Andy Marsh about why officers did not intervene when the Colston statue was torn down.

But Mr Harrington, the NPCC lead for public order, said it was up to operational commanders to make decisions on whether officers should step in to stop damage to monuments but said people’s safety would be prioritised over property.

He said: “What we will do is have appropriate plans and of course the officers will be there looking to make sure that people don’t get hurt in the first instance, trying to protect property if that’s the right thing to do, but people come first, making sure officers and those taking part are safe.”

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/poli ... 66821.html
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