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Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Mar 09, 2019 1:10 am

I can almost smell the delicious Kurdish food :ymdevil:

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There are 100s of photos of delicious Kurdish food online

I am starting to feel really hungry

Anyone else feeling hungry :ymdevil:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Mar 09, 2019 2:00 am

Something sweet :D

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All washed down with a healthy cup of Earl Grey Tea
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Healthy Earl Grey Tea Benefits

The name “Earl Grey” comes from Charles Grey of England, the second Earl Grey, who served as Britain’s Prime Minister from 1830-1834. It is still unknown how the tea came about this name, but suffice to say the blend has taken the world over with its bright citrus-y undertones and bold black tea flavor.

Earl grey tea is made using traditional black tea infused with the scent and flavor of dried bergamot orange peels. This can be done by tossing the black tea leaves with the bergamot peels and allowing them to infuse over period of time or by pressing the tea leaves and bergamot peels together to further instill flavor. The latter method produces a much sharper flavored tea.

The Health Benefits of Earl Grey Tea

1. Increased Immune Function

It has been found that earl grey tea boasts quite the immune boosting punch due to its high content of bergmot oil pressed from those little inedible citrus fruits that grow in the southern regions of Italy.

The peels of these fruits are full to bursting with potent antioxidants that target and destroy free radicals and oxidative stressors that cause havoc in the body. These antioxidants are known to help reduce fever, fight off infection, and fend off other forms of invaders like cold and flu germs.

This is why earl grey tea is the perfect winter beverage!

2. Boosts Energy

Aside from the caffeine content of a good black tea, earl grey has the added bonus of bergamot essential oil. This potent little EO is the key to earl grey tea’s clarifying benefits. So, if you have a fuzzy mind, sip up on some earl grey and feel its energizing and clarifying effects both mentally and physically.

3. Enahanced Mood

The bergamot essential oil found in earl grey tea is also an effective stress reducer because it alleviates anxiety, general negativity, and mild to moderate depression. It’s an excellent mood stabilizer, making it the perfect choice for those who suffer from mood swings occasional crankiness.

It’s almost impossible to feel a negative emotion while inhaling the delicious scent of earl grey tea. This is because a hot cup of earl grey essentially works like a personal essential oil diffuser. As you sip, the bergamot oil evaporates into the air and gets inhaled, leaving you feeling calm, less anxious, and stress free.

Plus, holding a comfortably hot mug in your hands and sipping tea is one of the best stress reducers I can think of! Who else loves taking a few precious moments to enjoy a good hot cup of tea?

4. Improved Digestion

Once again, the bergamot oil in earl grey tea swoops in to save the day! If you’re someone who suffers from frequent digestive upset like gas, bloating, cramping, constipation, or diarhhea, then earl grey tea may be the tea for you to help alleviate those symptoms.

Bergamot essential oil is known to be antispasmodic, meaning it soothes muscle cramping and spasming, even the kind associated with troublesome digestion. Simply sniffing bergamot oil or the aroma of earl grey tea can help alleviate nausea, though it isn’t recommended to have earl grey tea while pregnant.

5. Improved Dental Health

1-2 cups of earl grey tea a day is thought to prevents tooth decay and reduces the risk for cavities.

Earl grey tea also contains high amounts of a natural phenol and antioxidant called “catechin”, which is known to ward off infection in the mouth and the early stages of gingivitis.

6. Supports Heart Health

Several studies have confirmed that earl grey tea can reduce the risk for heart disease.

It was found that bergamot extract (aka the bergamot essential oil found in earl grey) can significantly lower bad cholesterol when consumed daily. This is due to its hydroxy methyl glutarly flavonones (HMGF) which are known to attack the proteins responsible for causing heart disease.

It is believed that the bergamot found in high quality earl grey tea (specifically one that ciontains HGMFs) can be just as effective as statin drugs. Not only does it reduce LDL levels (bad cholesterol), it also increases HDL (good cholesterol).

It’s also been proven to help reduce reduce body fat over a 12 week period
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Thu Apr 04, 2019 3:37 pm


Health effects of dietary risks in 195 countries, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017


https://hubs.ly/H0hhvcS0


The countries where people are dying because of bad nutrition vs where people have the less toxic food habits :


France, Spain and Australia are winners (I see why France and Spain, and also Israel if kosher is healthy, but Australia is weird)

https://els-jbs-prod-cdn.literatumonlin ... c9/gr2.jpg
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:00 pm

Why is French food so much healthier than UK food?
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Apr 05, 2019 1:12 am

One drink a day increases stroke risk

Even light-to-moderate drinking increases blood pressure and the chances of having a stroke, according to a large genetic study in The Lancet, countering previous claims that one or two drinks a day could be protective

The UK and Chinese researchers followed 500,000 Chinese people for 10 years.

They say the findings are relevant to all populations and the best evidence yet on the direct effects of alcohol.

Experts said people should limit their alcohol consumption.

It is already known that heavy drinking is harmful to health and increases stroke risk - but some studies have suggested drinking small amounts can be good for the health, while others indicate there is no safe level of alcohol consumption.

What did the research find?

The researchers, from the University of Oxford, Peking University and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, found that:

    one to two drinks a day increased stroke risk by 10-15%

    four drinks a day increased the risk of having a stroke by 35%

For the purposes of their study, one drink was defined as either:

    a small glass of wine

    a bottle of beer

    a single measure of spirits

About 16 in 100 men and 20 in 100 women will have a stroke in their lifetime in the UK.

So, if a group of 100 non-drinkers started drinking a glass or two every day, there would be an extra two strokes - a small increase.

According to Prof David Spiegelhalter, from the University of Cambridge, that's an increase in total stroke risk of 38% for every half a bottle of wine drunk per day.

He said: "It is very roughly the opposite effect of taking a statin", which are drugs prescribed by doctors to help lower cholesterol levels in the blood and prevent heart attacks and strokes.

The study also found no evidence of light or moderate drinking having a protective effect, in other words, reducing the risk of stroke.

When it came to the effect of alcohol on heart attack risk, the researchers said the effects were not clear cut and more data needed to be collected over the next few years.

"Claims that wine and beer have magical protective effects is not borne out," said study author Prof Richard Peto, from the University of Oxford.

Why China?

East Asian countries are useful places to study the effects of alcohol.

Many people with Chinese ancestry have a combination of genes that puts them off drinking alcohol. It causes an unpleasant reaction and makes them feel unwell.

As a result, there is a wide variation of alcohol intake in China - one in three men doesn't drink and very few women do.

But by comparing the health outcomes of drinkers and non-drinkers according to their genetic profile, scientists say they have been able to assess - with much more certainty than before - the direct effects of alcohol on stroke risk, distinct from any other factors.

Western populations don't possess these genes, so it would be impossible to carry out a similar study here.

Most studies are observational, which makes it's difficult to judge which factor is causing what effect.

Dr Iona Millwood, study author and senior epidemiologist at the University of Oxford, said: "Our genetic analyses have helped us understand the cause and effect relationships."

So what does this mean for me?

The researchers say their key message is that there is now clear evidence of no protective effect of moderate drinking on stroke.

That means drinking even small amounts of alcohol each day can increase the chances of having a stroke.

This is reflected in the current UK guidance - which advises a limit of 14 units of alcohol a week, with several alcohol-free days to keep health risks low.

What do other experts say?

Dr Stephen Burgess, from the University of Cambridge, said there were some limitations to the study - that it only looked at a Chinese population and focused mainly on the drinking of spirits and beer, not wine.

But he said the research reflected the culmination of many years of research into the impact of alcohol consumption.

"It strongly suggests that there is no cardiovascular benefit of light drinking and that risk of stroke increases even with moderate light alcohol consumption," he said.

"Risk of stroke increases proportionally with the amount of alcohol consumed, so if people do choose to drink, then they should limit their alcohol consumption."

Prof Kevin McConway, emeritus professor of applied statistics at the Open University, said the study didn't answer every question.

"It has certainly advanced what we know about the role of alcohol in some diseases but it can't be the last word," he said.

"The new study doesn't tie down exactly how alcohol works to increase stroke risk but doesn't appear to increase heart attack risk."

Prof David Spiegelhalter, Winton professor for the public understanding of risk, at the University of Cambridge, said the study was making him waver.

"I have always been reasonably convinced that moderate alcohol consumption was protective for cardiovascular disease, but now I am having my doubts," he said.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-47817650
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Fri Apr 05, 2019 5:29 am

Anthea wrote:Why is French food so much healthier than UK food?


That's also ask USA :lol:

I think that fresh food, cooking at home, with a lot of traditional recipes, do the job. Obesity is increasing in France, though, because poverty is increasing.

So perhaps poverty rates in USA and UK are more important.

The other reason might be sweet food. That's a shocking discovery for French people tasting UK/USA and even Scandinavian meals : always a sweet taste, as if jam or syrup was pouring on all plates.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Apr 11, 2019 3:37 am

Food waste: The UK versus France

Some eight million people in the UK struggle to afford a meal and are living in food poverty. At the same time, some experts predict the UK wastes 10 million tonnes of food every year.

Research suggests that the UK retail sector could donate 110,000 tonnes of food to people in need.

In France, it is now against the law for supermarkets above a certain size to throw away unused food. Instead, they must donate their excess edible food to a non-profit, charity, or food bank.

The law also mandates that school children are taught about food sustainability, agriculture, and cooking.

Now, France is at the top of the global food sustainability index. :ymapplause:

Link to Article - Video:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/clip/608 ... 4e39fe845f
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Apr 13, 2019 12:07 am

How the secret to surviving cancer could be in YOUR medicine cabinet

To say that Jane McLelland is lucky to be alive would be something of an understatement. At just 35, she was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cervical cancer. Standard treatment failed to halt the disease and five years later she was given the devastating news that tumours had spread to her lungs

Even given the best medical care, the odds on her pulling through were not good: five women in every 100 with a similar diagnosis live for five years or more. That’s a one-in-20 chance of survival.

Yet, here she is, in her 50s and a mother-of-two, radiating health and having been in remission since 2004. So, lucky, undoubtedly. But there is another more intriguing story behind Jane’s remarkable recovery.

Jane McLelland, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cervical cancer aged just 35 and has been in remission since 2004

When conventional medical approaches seemed to be failing, she began doing research herself and started taking a daily cocktail of drugs licensed not for cancer treatment but for other common health conditions.

The medications are some of the most commonly taken in the world: type 2 diabetes treatment metformin, cholesterol-busting statins, and aspirin.

She also took dipyridamole, a drug often given to stroke patients for clot-prevention.

Foolhardy? Jane, from Fulham, South-West London, says she had exhausted all other options so she had little to lose. Armed with her own research, she asked her oncologists to humour her and prescribe the drugs that they thought unnecessary.

Jane, pictured here with her husband Andrew, asked her oncologist to prescribe her drugs not normally given to cancer patients

Remarkably, her case is far from being a one-off. And there is mounting evidence that such ‘re-purposed’ treatments, when used alongside radiotherapy and chemotherapy, may be able to halt the progression of cancer and even stop it from returning.

Last week a landmark study of more than 50,000 women, published in the British Journal Of Cancer, found that long-term statin use can dramatically reduce the risk of a breast cancer returning in the opposite breast.

In the age of eye-wateringly expensive tumour therapies one new treatment, CAR-T, has just been given the green light for NHS funding at a cost of £282,000 per patient.

These drugs cost pennies, in many cases. They carry few side effects, and, astonishingly, appear to be effective for all types of cancer – bringing hope to millions.

The drugs that starve cancer

Aspirin has been used for thousands of years as a painkiller – the active ingredient, salicylic acid, was first extracted from willow bark by ancient Egyptians and used as medicine. Now it costs just 2p a tablet.

A study of more than 200,000 women published last month found that those taking a 75mg daily dose were nearly a quarter (23 per cent) less likely to develop ovarian cancer. It is thought this is because of the painkiller’s inflammation-busting abilities.

And a trial at Vanderbilt University in the US this month showed that patients on anti-diabetes tablet metformin had a reduced rate of liver cancer – suggesting that the pills could prevent the disease developing in the first place.

Statins, traditionally used for lowering cholesterol, could also dramatically cut the risk of dying from breast cancer by 40 per cent by halting tumour growth, say Chinese researchers. These findings are based on data from 200,000 women analysed by the National Cancer Centre in Beijing.

Another drug showing promise in cancer treatment is the 10p- a-day antibiotic doxycycline. According to new British research, these little blue capsules can kill the aggressive cells that cause tumours to return in some people with breast cancer.

To confound any sceptics, there are people in the UK still alive today who have been treated with a combination of these old cheap medicines. In some cases, they are fit and well decades after a bleak prognosis from medical experts that their cancer is incurable and nothing more can be done.

And Jane McLelland is just one astonishing example.

‘If I’d not taken these drugs then I’d have died,’ says Jane, whose two children, 12-year-old Jamie and Sam, nine, were conceived using a surrogate, with her husband Andrew, after chemotherapy and radiotherapy left her infertile.

‘I can never say I’m cured but the longer I remain disease-free, the more confident I am.’

Jane’s approach is now documented for the first time in a book and has been endorsed by a London clinic. Care Oncology in Harley Street is giving four key re-purposed drugs to its patients, in addition to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Their prescription includes metformin, the statin atorvastatin and doxycycline as well as mebendazole (sold as Ovex), a treatment for getting rid of threadworms.

All of these treatments have a similar positive ‘side effect’ in addition to their officially licensed uses. The theory is that they block a rapidly dividing tumour cell’s energy-making abilities, so the cancer first becomes weak, then either stops growing or dies. As Jane puts it, they ‘starve’ cancer by cutting off its fuel supply.

Could the scientists be missing a trick?

Developing a ‘game-changer’ treatment or drug that cures cancer is an obsession for pharmaceutical giants: it is estimated the industry invests an eye-watering £2 billion in each new potential breakthrough to combat the dreaded disease, including on research and bringing the medicine to market. Yet about 450 people still die of cancer every day in the UK – around 164,000 a year.

Dr Ndabezinhle Mazibuko from Care Oncology, who is also a clinical research fellow at King’s College London, believes so.

Conventional cancer drugs work in a variety of ways. Some, like chemotherapy, are toxic, and destroy cancer cells. There is always ‘collateral damage’, with the body’s healthy cells also affected, leading to the treatment’s many side effects.

Radiotherapy is more targeted, using blasts of radioactive X-rays to kill off tumour cells.

Newer therapies target hormonal processes that drive cancer, or reprogramme the body’s immune system so it attacks cancer cells which are normally adept at hiding and going undetected.

But the Care Oncology drug protocol has a different mechanism of action. ‘The common theme with all of these drugs is their metabolic approach,’ says Dr Mazibuko.

‘Cancer cells grow rapidly and consume more “fuel” than healthy ones. These medicines make tumour cells easier to destroy by stopping them using glucose in the bloodstream for energy. Normal cells do not metabolise energy in the same way so are not harmed.

‘Other drugs reduce inflammation, which can be a trigger for disease and tumour progression. It’s not about replacing radiotherapy or chemotherapy or doing anything without first consulting your doctor, but of having a multi-pronged way of dealing with cancer.’

The clinic has treated more than 1,500 patients with cancers ranging from breast to pancreatic, at every stage of tumour development and spread, except those with incurable cancer needing end-of-life care.

Data on 95 of these who took the four-drug cocktail following surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy has now been analysed by Dr Mazibuko and his colleagues.

All the patients were diagnosed with a type of cancer that forms in nerve tissue called glioblastoma that had spread to other organs.

The results showed that average survival rates for some patients were almost double (27.1 months) those observed in patients having cancer treatments currently considered the best available (14.8 months median). Care Oncology hopes to get the go-ahead for their results to be compared against NHS data on similar patients.

Other British experts are also convinced of the benefit of re-purposed drugs for cancer patients.

The scientist behind the breast cancer trials involving doxycycline is Professor Michael Lisanti at Salford University. A scientist with more than 30 years’ experience, his research is based on a discovery that the commonly used antibiotic can kill what are known as cancer stem cells.

Tumours are made up of numerous cell types, and only a few of these have the ability to divide and grow endlessly: cancer stem cells.

The theory is that many cancer treatments kill off the bulk of a tumour, but it has been discovered that if these stem cells are left behind, the cancer can, and will, regrow. Prof Lisanti says: ‘Scientists have never targeted cancer in this way before with antibiotics. But we’ve found a way to re-purpose these drugs with a remarkable therapeutic effect. And we can do this with almost zero side effects and in all types of cancers.’

Doxycycline works on cancer by suppressing the ability of stem cells to make new mitochondria –the tiny ‘powerhouse’ component in all cells that generates energy. ‘It’s an entirely new way of thinking about cancer,’ he says.

The 70p malaria drug …for colon cancer

Professor Sanjeev Krishna, who is studying whether the 70p malaria drug artesunate could be used to treat colorectal cancer, said ‘huge opportunities’ exist to re-purpose medicines such as statins and diabetes drugs.

Prof Krishna, of St George’s University of London, says: ‘You have to remember, Viagra started as a drug for high blood pressure. I’m not talking about a silver bullet but we know these treatments are cheap and safe.’

Professor Justin Stebbing is involved in studies at Imperial College London into how metformin and aspirin might be useful in the fight against cancer.

He emphasises that cancer patients are vulnerable, therefore re-purposed drugs as well as supplements should be handled with ‘enormous caution’ outside the context of clinical trials.

It is important to point out that Jane’s cancer weapons did also include conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which she had in 1994. Doctors gave her another dose of chemotherapy drugs in 1999.

In addition, she was enrolled in trials for a new therapy called dendritic cell vaccine that stimulates the immune system to attack tumours, which she took in 2000.

She consumed an extensive list of supplements, including intravenous Vitamin C, and radically changed her diet.

Her oncologist, Professor Hilary Thomas, formerly at the University of Surrey and now a medical adviser, described Jane’s case as very unusual, adding: ‘It’s impossible to say what was responsible [for her recovery] but as long as a patient isn’t taking anything harmful, then I would support it.’

For Jane, cancer no longer holds any fear, and she says this is due to her determination not to let the disease beat her. ‘I’m confident that if it did come back, I’d know how to deal with it – I’m armed and ready.’

    All medication taken by Jane was prescribed by medical professionals. Seek the advice of a GP before pursuing experimental treatment. For more details of Jane’s story, go to howtostarve cancer.com. How To Starve Cancer, by Jane McLelland, is published by Agenor Publishing at £19.99. Offer price £15.99 (20 per cent discount) until November 11. Order at mailshop.co.uk/books or call 0844 571 0640; p&p free on orders over £15. Spend £30 on books and get free premium delivery.
Five common drugs that could kill off tumours

1. Painkiller

One of the most common over-the-counter painkillers, aspirin blocks enzymes used in the manufacture of prostaglandins, chemicals that alert the brain to pain and make tissue swell by triggering the release of fluid. It reduces the chronic inflammation believed to trigger DNA damage in cells and lead to tumours forming. Scientists believe aspirin may also limit production of a protein that has the potential to mutate a healthy cell into a cancer cell. A Harvard University study of more than 200,000 women published this month found that those taking 75mg dose a day were 23 per cent less likely to develop ovarian cancer.

2. Diabetes pill

Metformin – also known as biganide – is one of the medicines most commonly given to type 2 diabetics, a condition characterised by a dangerously high blood sugar. It works by preventing the production of glucose in the liver, improving the sensitivity of muscle cells towards the hormone insulin and reducing the amount of sugar absorbed by the intestines. In cancer, it suppresses the process within cells involved in generating glucose, which cancer needs to grow. The drug inhibits an enzyme involved in this process without affecting normal cells.

Results published in the journal Cancer Causes And Control last month showed that patients on the treatment had a reduced rate of liver cancer when compared to those on an alternative anti-diabetes tablet, according to the Vanderbilt University, study which was based on data from nearly 85,000 patients.

3. Parasite drug

Mebendazole is a treatment for threadworms. It is thought to work by blocking the parasites from absorbing sugars needed to live. The drug inhibits parts of the cell involved in glucose uptake. It is believed to inhibit the growth of cancer cells by breaking down a protein involved in enabling tumour cells to get energy. The treatment stopped brain tumours growing in mice implanted with cancer cells, according to research by Johns Hopkins University in the US. Trials are now under way to test its potential in children and adults with glioblastoma, an aggressive brain cancer.

4. Cholesterol pill

Statins work by blocking the enzyme HMG CoA Reductase, which the liver uses to make cholesterol – a type of fat that is useful in small amounts in the circulation, as it helps form cell walls, but in larger quantities may contribute to heart disease.

The drugs are thought to halt tumour growth in a similar way: HMG-CoA reductase is involved in producing cholesterol which cancer cells use for energy. An analysis by the National Cancer Centre in Beijing has shown statins such as atorvastatin and lovastatin could cut the risk of dying from breast cancer by 38 per cent. The findings were based on studies involving 200,000 women diagnosed with the disease and presented in June 2017 at the American Society of Clinical Oncology in the US.

5. Antibiotic

Doxycycline is an antibiotic prescribed for conditions ranging from pneumonia to acne. It suppresses the ability of bacteria to make the necessary proteins for survival. It also suppresses the ability of cancer stem cells to make new mitochondria, the parts of the cell that generate energy enabling the cancer to feed and grow. A low daily dose of the drug can kill aggressive cells that cause tumours to return in some people with breast cancer. This is according to a Salford University study published this month.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/arti ... binet.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:15 am

A new breed of vegan burgers created in a lab

Few things in life are as simple – or as pleasurable to eat – as a burger

That first bite, the rich, meaty and slightly charred flavours, mixed with smooth, salty cheese, the sharpness of onion and the tang of veg and sauce.

If this sounds vaguely obsessive, it’s because I’ve not eaten one since going vegetarian four years ago. Do I miss them? Clearly.

Five Guys, Shake Shack, Byron, The Handmade Burger Co – I once enjoyed them all.

My personal go-to was the McDonald’s classic Double Cheese Burger – it just hit the spot, quite perfectly.

The Moving Mountains burger is among a new wave of meat-substitute products said to look, smell and taste just like the real thing. They have same texture in the mouth as minced beef, say manufacturers

I’ve no regrets about quitting meat. I was put off by stories of horse meat in beef products and organic chicken that was anything but. Then there were reports of the vast quantities of antibiotics used on animals reared by the meat, poultry and fish industries – a major contributor to the global threat of drug-resistant bacterial infections.

However, I found bean burgers a bit of a letdown. They promise much but often seem to be either so dry that they suck the moisture from your mouth, or dissolve into a baby-food-like mush as you eat them.

And don’t even get me started on restaurants that try to pass off a Portobello mushroom sandwiched in a bap as a burger.

Of course, there are meat-substitutes made from soya, wheat or Quorn, a substance derived from an edible fungus, of which I’ve never been a fan. They are generally flavourless, and more akin to eating Play-Doh or rubber than meat.

There’s also something inherently disappointing about one food pretending to be another. Badly.

But now the alt-meat burger is undergoing something of a reinvention…

THE FAKE MEAT REVOLUTION IS HERE

Increasingly available in high street burger restaurants, and, in the case of the Beyond Meat burger, in supermarkets, there is a new wave of meat-substitute products said to look, smell and taste just like the real thing. They have same texture in the mouth as minced beef, say manufacturers.

Some, if you cook them right, even ‘bleed’ like a real burger. But they are 100 per cent vegan.

Last week, Burger King started stocking the vegan Impossible Burger in a move to attract 1.6 million vegans and vegetarians in Britain today and 22m who describe themselves as ‘flexitarian’

The success of these products, initially in trendy burger joints, has snowballed. Now fast-food mega-chains are getting in on the act.

Last week, Burger King started stocking the vegan Impossible Burger, and Nestle launched their soya and wheat protein Garden Gourmet Incredible Burger.

In addition, the Harvester chain has starting selling the Moving Mountains Burger – the fabled ‘bleeding’ vegan patty.

And they are not just aiming at the 1.6 million vegans and vegetarians in Britain today.

Companies are hoping to court the 22 million who describe themselves as ‘flexitarian’: part-time non-meat-eaters who opt for veggie meals and products in an attempt to boost their health.

A third of Britons now claim to have ‘meat-free days’, citing ‘health reasons’ and concerns for the environment as the main reasons.

Further down the line, with food-industry analysts warning that our insatiable desire for ever-cheaper meat is unsustainable, we could soon all be happily munching on lab-manufactured ‘beef’ burgers that have never even been near a cow.

Perhaps concerned that alt-meat is ever more difficult to distinguish from the real thing, earlier this month the European agriculture committee moved to ban producers of vegetarian food using descriptions usually deployed for meat, suggesting that veggie burgers should be renamed ‘veggie discs’.

So what is actually in these burgers (or discs), and do they really taste like meat?

To find out, we analysed exactly what the manufacturers put in their patties – and spoke to UK food-technology experts about how something so strikingly similar to beef can be made from plants.

With the help of leading dieticians, we examined the nutritional content to find out whether new-wave vegan meat substitutes are actually better for us – or even good for us at all.

And, most importantly, we tried them ourselves.

LOOKS, SMELLS AND TASTES LIKE MEAT... BUT IT’S NOT

Any scepticism I had about the plausibility of turning protein powder and some vegetables into a convincing burger evaporated when I ate a Moving Mountains Burger at our local US-style diner, Dirty Bones.

The patty is made from a blend of soy, wheat and pea protein, mushroom, beetroot juice – for colour – and coconut oil.

Nestle launched their soya and wheat protein Garden Gourmet Incredible Burger (pictured) this month

Impossible Foods unveils bleeding realistic vegan burger

My memory of meat may be hazy, but I honestly think I’ve had less beefy-tasting beef burgers. It had the firmness and give, and that soft, yet chewy and slightly fibrous texture that real minced meat has.

Visually, it was equally convincing. The outside was brown and slightly glossy, inside it was a juicy pink and textured, with a few flecks of white – just like a real beef burger cooked medium rare.

At one point I had to check with the waitress that she hadn’t accidentally given me a ‘real’ burger.

For a more rigorous taste test, I ordered the patty on its own.

Naked, it was slightly less convincing. There was a subtle, slightly bitter flavour that beef perhaps doesn’t have. But again, compared to a McDonald’s burger, for instance, it was way meatier.

MEAT-FREE: Barney Calman and Eve Simmons sample alt-burgers at Dirty Bones in Kensington, west London

Iceland promotes No Bull vegan burger on Facebook

Moving Mountains is the brainchild of entrepreneur Simeon Van der Molen, who also founded EcoZone, the green cleaning product brand.

Why, I wonder, would someone who doesn’t eat meat want to eat something that looked, smelled and tasted exactly like, for want of a better term, animal flesh?

‘Our product isn’t just aimed at vegans or vegetarians,’ he admits. ‘It’s also for people who want to eat more healthily.

‘If someone is eating five burgers a week, and they’re worried about their cholesterol levels, they can keep eating burgers and get their cholesterol lower by swapping beef for our burger a few times a week.’
Vegan maybe... but one burger had twice the fat of a Big Mac

By Eve Simmons, Deputy Health Editor

There is no doubting the scientific input needed to make juicy, meat-free burgers that are uncannily like the real thing. But how does the new generation of alt-meat burgers perform when it comes to health… and taste?

MOVING MOUNTAINS

Cals: 247. Saturated fat: 18g. Sugar: 0.6g. Protein: 14.4g. Fibre: 4.1g. Salt: 1.2g.

WHAT’S IN IT? A mix of pea, wheat and soy protein combined with mushrooms, chicory and tomatoes. Flour, oats and barley provide bulk and almost five teaspoons of coconut oil per patty binds the ingredients together.

It has plant-based bulking agents, plus sugar syrup, spices and lemon juice and added Vitamin B12. Beetroot juice gives colour.

VERDICT: One patty alone contains twice the saturated fat of a Big Mac, thanks to the coconut oil. It also packs more calories, sugar and almost three times the salt of a Tesco Finest beef burger.

The addition of a brioche bun and sauce takes it up to about 600 calories – more than half a margherita pizza.

However, there is the addition of Vitamin B12, essential for healthy blood vessels, and the same amount of bowel-friendly fibre as in a potato.

TASTE test: I’m not a burger fan. But I was surprised how meaty-tasting this was – and the texture and redness inside the patty were extremely convincing. This was the best of the bunch in terms of flavour.

HEALTH RATING: 2/5

BEYOND MEAT BURGER

Cals: 255. Saturated fat: 3.8g. Sugar: 0.2g. Protein: 19.6g. Fibre: 0.5. Salt: 1g.

WHAT’S IN IT? Mainly powder made from pea protein – it makes up a fifth of the burger. Coconut oil appears again, as does potato starch, yeast, sunflower oil, beetroot and gum Arabic – a popular thickener often used in sweets like chewing gum, plus a bulking agent made from a substance found in bamboo.

VERDICT: Although it’s the highest in calories, the Beyond Meat burger has the lowest saturated fat of all alt-meat burgers and half that of a real burger.

Sugar content is about the same, as is fibre, with salt fractionally higher.

Linia Patel, a dietician specialising in public health, says that pea protein lacks the array of amino acids that meat has and which are needed to successfully build protein in the body.

She says: ‘By choosing this burger over beef, you are substituting protein-rich meat for a poor-quality vegetable protein.’

This burger loses points for its lack of vitamins too.

A typical beef burger boasts important vitamins such as B12, B6, E, D and K, as well as iron and thiamine. Beyond Meat’s burger has none of these added but is injected with Vitamin C, which you won’t find in a typical beef burger.

TASTE test: In a word, bland. Served in a bap with a large amount of cheese, sauce and onion, it’s flavourful. But on its own, the patty tasted of nothing much. Burger lovers in the office were similarly unconvinced.

HEALTH RATING: 3/5

IMPOSSIBLE BURGER

Cals: 240. Saturated fat: 8g. Sugar: less than 1g. Protein: 19g. Fibre: 3g. Salt: 0.37g.

WHAT’S IN IT? A concoction of almost 20 different ingredients that include powdered soya, coconut oil, sunflower oil, potato protein, yeast and vitamins.

Next, there’s a range of additives, such as the bulking agent methylcellulose, preservatives, flavourings and wheat starch.

But the crucial ingredient is ‘heme’, the compound that gives red meat its distinctive colour, juicy texture and taste. They claim their burger is nutritionally equivalent to meat.

VERDICT: It has six times the fibre of a regular beef burger, and an extra two grams of protein.

One patty also offers twice the recommended daily intake of Vitamin B12, essential for healthy blood vessels, and the same quantity of disease-fighting zinc as you’ll find in a beef burger.

It has similar amounts of saturated fat, sugar and calories to a real burger.

Linia Patel says potatoes and soya protein lack the amino acids that meat has, and these are vital for keeping muscle and bones healthy.

And there are question marks over how well the vitamins and heme are absorbed. ‘We know all the B vitamins in meat work together to be absorbed well by the body,’ says Patel. ‘We don’t know if the same is true for this version.’

TASTE test: The skinny, sinewy patty is slathered in spicy burger sauce which masks its lacklustre flavour. It does smell and look just like the McDonald’s equivalent, but the dull taste is incomparable. I continue chewing, waiting for my taste buds to awaken, but there’s no response.

HEALTH RATING: 4/5

The Moving Mountains burger – which is fortified with Vitamin B12, essential for a healthy nervous system and circulation, but found only in meat, offal or fish – contains no synthetic ingredients, he adds. ‘Even the beef flavouring is completely natural.’

THE MAKING OF AN ALT-MEAT BURGER

‘Completely natural’? It’s an interesting statement, so how true is it?

None of the companies making new-wave vegan beef burgers will reveal their exact manufacturing methods for commercial reasons.

However, using their listed ingredients, and with the help of technical food consultant Lindsay Bagley, we can get an idea.

Like all meat-substitutes, the primary ingredients in these burgers are proteins – derived from soya, peas, wheat and potato, either alone or in combination.

Most vegan products on supermarket shelves use these to make textured vegetable protein, or TVP – a product that was invented in the late 1950s, originally made from soy beans, as a cheap way to ‘bulk’ meat in ready meals.

To create TVP, first you need a protein powder, also known as ‘isolate’ or ‘concentrate’. To obtain this, the original soya bean, pea or other plant must first be crushed and ground to remove the indigestible outer shell, or hull, and then the plant’s natural oils must be removed via a ‘defatting’ process.

The most commonly used method is called hexane extraction.

Simply pressing the vegetable matter doesn’t remove enough oil, so a solvent is added. Benzene and ether can be used, but hexane, which is chemical by-product of crude oil is most commonly used.

The solvent is evaporated away with heat, leaving a solid residue which can then be milled into flours or ‘grits’ that are about 50 per cent protein.

Interestingly, defatted soy flour is also used as a glue in some forms of plywood.

But for it to be used in TVP, it is then washed further in ethanol, acidic waters, and later alkali, to remove carbohydrates and then centrifuged and dried to create a concentrated powder that is about 90 per cent protein.

‘This tastes pretty foul,’ admits Bagley, who advises companies on the manufacture and formulation of foods.

‘Proteins in their naked form have a bitter, astringent flavour that’s not palatable at all.’

Next, the powders are mixed with water, oils, emulsifiers and flavourings to mask the bitter taste. And this paste is then put into a machine known as an extruder.

‘These are a bit like pressure cookers – they use very high-pressure and heat, which gets rid of some of the unpleasant-tasting compounds,’ explains Bagley. ‘What comes out the other end is either a dough or a dry product.

‘You can create just about any shape you like, and a variety of textures. It can be spun into threads, which can then be compressed into what resembles chicken chunks, or thicker fibres to mimic meat. The options are pretty endless.’

The result of the extrusion process is TVP. But as Bagley explains: ‘This isn’t a saleable product. It’s an off-white colour, and doesn’t taste like much, so it’s mixed with other ingredients to add further moisture, texture, colour, and flavour.’

Moving Mountains and their competitors have invested millions into refining this process to create a premium, and highly realistic product – but the exact details of how are a closely guarded secret.

The Impossible Foods burger, which is being rolled out by Burger King in the US but is not currently approved for sale in the UK or Europe, is even more high-tech, and involved genetically engineering yeast to produce a type of iron normally found only in animal blood.

So on paper, yes, they are made from plants. But ‘completely natural’ seems to be stretching it a bit.

HOW MUCH MEAT IS IN THE REAL THING?

OF course, a delicious slice of organic grass-fed beef is as naturally nourishing as it gets

But in an age of spiralling food costs, old-fashioned butchered meat – of the type not reared with antibiotics, and prepared by being pumped with water and food dyes – can be extravagantly expensive.

Burgers are a more affordable family meal. But just how much meat is in the real thing anyway? You can find out with a quick check online. Tesco’s Finest British Beef Steak Burgers (£3 for four) are 94 per cent beef, but their Butchers Choice Burgers (£1.35 for eight) contain just 63 per cent beef. The rest? Onion, pea flour, water, beef fat, salt, dextrose, yeast extract, sugar, pea flakes, onion extract, and black pepper.

If you start to look at chicken products, the picture becomes dismal. One thing can’t be denied: we want burgers. According to analysts Mintel, last year Britons spent an astounding £5 billion in burger restaurants, up 7.5 per cent in one year alone. Demand has never been greater.

About 70 billion animals are reared for food each year and demand is projected to increase by 70 per cent by 2050, yet the industry is said already to cause 14.5 per cent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.

And there is mounting evidence that consumption of red meat – and in particular processed red meat, like burgers – is linked to increased risk of heart disease, obesity and bowel cancer.

Something has to give, so could fake meat be the answer?

As I said before, I didn’t stop eating meat for any reason other than the fact that I don’t trust supermarkets.

But the reason I put on quite a lot of weight in my 20s was because of my obsession with fast food.

Plant-based or not, burgers still pack a punch in terms of calories, fat, salt and all the rest.

Fake meat has won me over in a sense. But I don’t think I’ll be going back to my old ways.

Well, maybe not too often, anyway.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/arti ... -beef.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Apr 14, 2019 2:30 am

NHS doctor and top chef reveal
low-carb diet plan to reverse diabetes


Here's a figure that will shock you: approximately every three minutes, someone in the UK is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes

Meanwhile, more people than ever are undergoing amputations because of diabetes complications — that’s quite apart from the added risk of heart disease, blindness, colorectal or breast cancer, stroke and premature death.

Then there’s the estimated 7 million people in the UK who have ‘pre-diabetes’ — an under-diagnosed condition that makes them up to 15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

Like GPs across the country, I’ve witnessed this epidemic in my own Southport practice with alarm. Just after I joined the surgery in 1986, there were only 57 patients with type 2 diabetes — and none was under the age of 50.

Jill Newsham, 62, is a university lecturer and lives in Southport with her husband Mike, 64. Jill was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2012. She says:

Diabetes crept up on me really. I was due to have an operation, but when I went for my pre-op assessment, the medics were shocked by how high my blood sugar was. I knew I was carrying too much weight — I was 5ft 2in and 15st — but I had never thought about type 2 diabetes.

They had to cancel the operation. I was referred back to my GP, Dr David Unwin, who prescribed quite a high dose of metformin. This was before he’d started his low- carb programme.

I lost a bit of weight cutting back on obvious sugar such as biscuits, but it was only when I started to get control over the starchy stuff that things really changed for me. It dawned on me that if I was cutting out sugar, should I also be cutting back on starchy carbohydrates as well, as they break down into sugar?

I’d been following a low-carb diet for about a year when the diabetes nurse mentioned that Dr Unwin had started doing this with some of his patients at the practice — and I joined the support group he runs.

I’m just over 11 st now and no longer take metformin. I’ve bumped into old colleagues and they’ve not recognised me. Also, eating this way lifts my mood — I feel more optimistic.

Thirty years on and we’ve gone from 57 patients with type 2 to 470. Twenty-one of them are aged under 50 (with an average body weight of 17 ½ st) — and the youngest is 24.

And at the root of it all lies obesity. We have eaten our way into this epidemic. But I believe we can eat our way out of it. I know this because many patients in my practice have done just that. For them, the secret was going low-carb.

By switching to this approach, 40 per cent of my patients actually reversed their type 2 diabetes so they no longer need medication — their blood pressure, cholesterol and liver function have also improved.

Thanks to this work, in 2016 I was named NHS Innovator of the Year and my approach is now being taught to GPs across the country through the Royal College of General Practitioners — I even met the Health Secretary Matt Hancock to discuss low carb for type 2 diabetes.

While this is not a weight-loss plan as such, it’s a lifestyle change, nearly all my patients on a low-carb diet have lost weight — on average around 1½ st (9kg) over 20 months — and have kept it off.

Now, I’m sharing my approach with you, too — and it could transform life.

If you’re someone who’s been diagnosed with type 2, or have been warned you’re on the cusp, and you want to try this approach, starting today in the Mail’s Weekend magazine, we’ll show you delicious low-carb breakfasts, lunches and dinners.

Chris Hannaway, 58, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in his 40s and has since used Dr David Unwin's low-carb programme to lose weight and get his blood sugar under control. He has gone from more than 19st to just over 13st

Chris Hannaway, 58, is a retired civil servant and lives in Southport, Merseyside, with his wife. Diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2001, he says:

Before I started the low-carb approach, I was on metformin for my diabetes, as well as a daily aspirin, a blood pressure drug and a statin. I felt dreadful all the time. I was the wrong end of 19st (I’m 5ft 10in).

Now, six years after starting the low-carb diet, I’m just over 13st.

I was in my mid-40s when I was diagnosed with type 2. In 2013, I went for a long overdue medication review, saw Dr David Unwin and he hit me with his low-carb diet sheet.

It meant a massive change: I could easily get through half a loaf of bread a day and I was also a great drinker of beer — which, as Dr Unwin puts it, is really just ‘liquid toast’.

Now I can eat olive oil, cream and cheese. I get to have things such as omelettes with spinach, or steak and salad.

Dr Unwin has turned my life around.

Today, I’ll also share the seven key principles that form the basis of the diet.

All next week, in exclusive pullouts in the Mail, you’ll be given the easy and delicious recipes that can help to reverse diabetes — from low-carb pasta dishes to tempting occasion cakes.

I’ve teamed up with top chef Giancarlo Caldesi and his wife Katie, a food writer, to show how you, too, can transform your health with low-carb recipes for the wonderful food we all love.

One of the joys of going low carb — apart from enjoying better health — is that fats from natural sources are an essential part of the diet. This means olive oil, avocado, cream, full-fat Greek yoghurt and butter (even goose or duck fat) can be part of the menu.

Together, these six free pullouts form a potentially life-changing plan for taking control of your health.

In my first 25 years as a GP, I had never seen diabetes go into remission. But I am delighted to say that it’s something I see most weeks now in my clinical practice — hundreds of my patients have now gone low carb and, not only are they healthier, but we’re prescribing fewer diabetes drugs than other practices in our area, saving the NHS around £40,000 per year.

Chef Giancarlo’s personal type 2 diabetes story is particularly inspiring. Over the years, his love of good food left him not just overweight, but with arthritis, blurred vision and blackouts. Eventually, he was diagnosed with type 2.

Debra Scott, 56, is a mother-of-two who lives in Blackpool with husband Eric, 56. Diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2017, she says:

I didn’t even know what a carbohydrate was before I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and learned that a low-carb diet could help. I went home and cried my eyes out. I knew how serious it can be, because my mum had type 2 diabetes before she passed away 12 years ago. She’d lost her sight and had sores on her legs that wouldn’t heal. I didn’t want that to happen to me.

I was so happy to be offered a solution when I found Dr Unwin and the support group diabetes.co.uk.

I was 14st 7lb and a dress size 18/20, but I thought my diet was quite healthy. Breakfast was cereal, brown toast with butter and apple juice. I’d have a sandwich for lunch, maybe tea and a biscuit in the afternoon and dinner would be something like curry and rice, perhaps with a wine or two.

Using Dr Unwin’s diet sheet, I lost a stone in a month and was down two stone by the time I went back to see the nurse in February. I’m 10st 7lb now and don’t want to lose any more. I am keeping up the diet, though — it’s really easy to eat this way. I feel fantastic.

Despite following advice from an NHS dietitian to eat smaller portions and cut back on sugar, he got heavier, peaking at 17½ st (he’s 5ft 9in). And then his feet started to become numb — a sign of nerve damage that could lead to amputation.

That’s when he and Katie came across low carb. And they haven’t looked back — Giancarlo has lost 3st, feels healthier and his diabetes is in full remission.

Katie — who didn’t have type 2 but went low-carb anyway — has dropped two dress sizes (down to a 12) and says she has more energy, with no more afternoon slumps.

And they’ve done it by eating the delicious recipes — devised by Katie and Giancarlo themselves — that are featured in the Mail today and next week.

So what is it about carbs that’s a problem? Essentially, people who develop type 2 have a problem with sugar, or glucose. Our bodies respond to a sugary meal by producing the hormone insulin, which pushes the extra sugar into muscle cells for energy. Excess sugar is also pushed into belly fat and the liver. This results in weight gain and the insulin the body produces being less effective.

As a result, sugar builds up in the blood, resulting in higher than normal levels circulating in the blood, which, over time, damages small blood vessels in vital organs.

The combination (problems with sugar metabolism and obesity) is what often causes type 2 diabetes.

From this, it would seem obvious to cut sugar out of the diet. Yet lots of people don’t realise sugar is disguised in many foods, such as those with a lot of naturally occurring sugar — i.e. fruit juice, raisins and honey — and in starchy carbohydrates including bread, rice and potato.

Often, I come across patients who are mystified by their diabetes, saying that they have already cut out sugar, so how come they still have diabetes?

Most people only think of the obvious sources, such as sweetened drinks or chocolate, missing the important fact that starchy carbohydrates are broken down by digestion into surprising amounts of glucose. For example, a 30g slice of wholemeal bread affects blood sugar to the same extent as three teaspoons of sugar.

Of course, it has other benefits, such as B vitamins and fibre — but, if you have type 2, the sugar effect is very important. This explains why the latest NICE guidelines for type 2 diabetes state that you should eat foods high in fibre and low GI (glycaemic index) — nearly all breads and cereals have a high GI compared with green veg, most nuts and eggs.

Peter Palmer, 66, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2015. He has managed to get his blood sugar back to normal levels without medication by adopting a low-carb diet. Over several years he went from a 36in waist to a 42in and was 17st

I’d thought I was doing all the ‘right’ things, eating muesli for breakfast and wholegrain sandwiches for lunch. I’d cut right back on sugar, chose low-fat food and went to the gym regularly.

But despite this, I kept putting on weight and my blood sugar level was going up. Over several years, I went from a 36in waist to a 42in and was 17st.

At that point, my GP wanted to start me on metformin, which reduces the amount of sugar released into the blood by the liver, but I felt there had to be a better way than drugs.

I found diabetes.co.uk, which had information about a low-carb diet developed with GP Dr David Unwin. Within ten days, I noticed I was losing weight, and I felt fitter.

What I eat now is real food: meat, cheese, dairy, lots of veg.

I’m down to 13st 7lb and back in my 36in waist trousers.

Personally, I would advise the first step is to remove table sugar from your diet as much as possible.

This may not always be enough, though. Many people with type 2 also find it helps to ‘turn the white part of your meal green’. So, instead of rice, pour your curry over a selection of green veg.

In many cases, these simple first steps can create a huge difference — not just in type 2 diabetes, but also blood pressure and mood —and can mean patients no longer need lifelong drugs for type 2 (obviously, it’s very important to check with your doctor if you’re already on diabetes medication before cutting carbs).

This is why I don’t accept that the epidemic of type 2 diabetes is inevitable or hopeless.

But I didn’t always think like this: in fact, for the first 25 years, I didn’t think there was much that could be done about this depressing trend. It seemed largely to be a matter of adding in more drugs or increasing dosages.

Then, one day, about seven years ago, everything changed when I met a patient who’d lost so much weight I didn’t recognise her — and blood tests showed she’d reversed her type 2 diabetes. And this was despite her coming off her diabetes medication!

I was fascinated, having not seen a single case of remission in my medical career. How had she achieved this?

She told me she was one of 40,000 members of a low-carb forum on the website diabetes.co.uk. Thus began my journey of discovery.

In January 2013, my wife, Dr Jen Unwin, an NHS psychologist, and I started a low-carb group in my GP practice, and, with our practice nurse, Heather, we trialled a low-carb diet.

Along with 18 volunteer patients, we met weekly and learned about low-carbing together.

I started by encouraging patients they could make real health improvements — if they were prepared to seriously reduce glucose from their diets.

Many of them were particularly interested in avoiding lifelong medication for diabetes. As well as losing an average 1½ st over 20 months, they have seen improvements in their type 2 diabetes. The majority also had better blood pressure control and lower cholesterol.

My wife Jen and I also benefitted from going low carb — as well as losing my middle-aged spread, I have a lot more energy and now require 90 minutes less sleep a night. And my previously high blood pressure is a thing of the past.

Jen is now also slimmer and has overcome her addiction to carbs that resulted in her being overweight since the age of 16 (I’ll explain more about carb addiction in the series next week).

Since 2013, we have rolled out this approach to 257 patients, with similar results. However, it would not be fair to say this is all my idea: the low-carb diet has a global following, and not just among those with diabetes.

Dr David Unwin has teamed up with top chef Giancarlo Caldesi to create a low-carb meal plan for those who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes

And, of course, it’s important to point out that no single diet will suit all and there are other ways to tackle type 2 diabetes — for instance, the 800-calories-a-day approach, developed by the brilliant Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University, and types of gastric surgery used to help those who are morbidly obese have both produced good results.

And, for the sake of balance, I should point out that there are experts who worry about low-carb diets in the long-term (though, over the six years, so far I haven’t come across significant problems).

An Austrian consultant, specialist Dr Wolfgang Lutz, was on the diet for 40 years, until his death at the age of 96, and he used the approach to help his patients for decades.

For some people, low carb can end up meaning higher in fat. And, in the early days of low-carbing, I worried about the effects on cholesterol and cardiovascular risk.

But, on measuring it in my patients, I was surprised to find the average cholesterol actually came down. This, together with the improved blood pressure and weight loss my patients experienced, could, in fact, suggest improved heart health.

The saturated fat debate remains contentious, however a very recent major review (involving eight studies and 1,600 participants) concluded: ‘Large randomised controlled trials of at least six months duration with carbohydrate restriction appear superior in improving lipid markers [cholesterol and other blood fats] when compared with low-fat diets.’ When it comes to type 2 diabetes, there are other factors — such as stress and lack of exercise — that play a role. But I believe the most important cause is diet.

I see this as a message of hope, because we all have some control over our dietary choices — and I believe that a low-carb approach presents many of us with a great opportunity to turn back the clock on obesity and diabetes.

And in this series — today and all next week — we’ll show you exactly how to do it.
Seven rules of the low-carb plan

The following rules are for someone who needs to stick to very low-carb limits — to find out if that’s you, take our CarbScale quiz, which you will find in Weekend magazine. If you’re lean and otherwise healthy, the rules still apply, but you can afford a little more leeway, such as adding extra fruit or some starchy vegetables.

    1 Reduce or eliminate sugar and starchy carbohydrate foods. These include: breakfast cereals, bread, pasta, white potatoes, rice, couscous, crackers, oats, oat cakes, rice cakes, cakes, biscuits, sweets, milk chocolate, fruit juice, fizzy drinks and cordials.

    2 Load up with vegetables at each meal. Use non-starchy and salad vegetables — such as broccoli, courgettes, green beans, aubergine and cabbage — to help you feel full without raising your blood sugar levels. Adjust your consumption of root vegetables according to where you are on the CarbScale quiz.

    3 Eat good fats. Include oily fish, olive oil, coconut oil, avocado and animal fats — they’re good for adding flavour, as well as for helping you feel full. Add nuts and cheese in moderation only — although they’re nutritious and tasty, they are also highly calorific.

    4 Opt for fruit that is naturally low in sugar. This includes berries, apples and pears. Choose these over high-sugar tropical fruits, such as bananas, mango and pineapple.

    5 Eat some form of protein in every meal. It’s essential for all your body’s repair mechanisms and helps you feel fuller for longer.

    6 Stop snacking. Fasting between meals and overnight really helps to improve insulin resistance. Aim for three good meals a day — and then stop.

    7 Drink two litres of water each day. To find out how low in carbs you should go, don’t forget to take the CarbScale quiz printed in Weekend magazine today, along with a host of delicious, low-carb recipes to tempt you and your family.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... -plan.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Apr 16, 2019 1:33 am

Cancer patients take a dose
of naturopathy in Kurdistan


Fereh is from Sanandij in Rojhelat (Eastern Kurdistan). She’s been hiking for 26 years, and now she is a naturopathist at the Hiwa Cancer Hospital in Sulaimani in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq

Now, she is introducing her cancer patients to this activity.

"Instead of using the chemicals, we treat them with oxygen. The cancer cells are weak. We add extra oxygen to the blood. This will kill the cancer cells," she told Rudaw.

A group arranges a hiking excursion every month. Eleven people in one cohort have cancer. They’ve been fighting cancer for two years.

"I had chemical injections. Later, I came to do exercises. By doing this the chemicals gradually are reducing. I go hiking 3 days per week. Thank God, I am good now," said hiker Shuaiba Hussein.

Muradi says the activity has spread from Rojhelat to the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

The hiking group includes Kurds, Arabs, Persians, and Turks.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/15042019
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 17, 2019 2:14 am

Eating 76g of red meat STILL
raises your risk of bowel cancer


Eating moderate amounts of ham, bacon and and red meat still raises the risk of bowel cancer, a major study suggests

Scientists compared the risk between people who stick to NHS guidelines on red and processed meat consumption - 70g a day - and those who don't.

They found those who eat more than recommended face a fifth higher risk of bowel cancer, compared to those who eat smaller amounts.

Researchers led by a team at the University of Oxford followed nearly 500,000 people for almost six years.

Some 2,609 of the participants - who were aged between 40 and 69 at the start of the study - went on to develop bowel cancer, which is more common in older people.

Scientists compared the risk between people who stick to NHS guidelines on red and processed meat consumption - 70g a day - and those who don't

The study found people consuming an average of 76g per day of red and processed meat had a higher risk to those who ate 21g or less a day.

For red meat only, the risk was around 15 per cent higher for people who ate 54g per day - a lamb chop, compared with those who had 8g per day.

For processed meat only, the risk was 19 per cent higher for those who ate 29g per day - a slice of bacon, compared with those eating around 5g per day.

Existing evidence points to a higher bowel cancer risk for every 50g of processed meat a person eats per day.

But the new study found that risk increases at just 25g per day - a third of what the average daily intake is.

Professor Tim Key co-authored the study and is deputy director at the University of Oxford's cancer epidemiology unit.

WHAT IS BOWEL CANCER?

Bowel, or colorectal, cancer affects the large bowel, which is made up of the colon and rectum.

Such tumours usually develop from pre-cancerous growths, called polyps.

Symptoms include:

    Bleeding from the bottom
    Blood in stools
    A change in bowel habits lasting at least three weeks
    Unexplained weight loss
    Extreme, unexplained tiredness
    Abdominal pain

Most cases have no clear cause, however, people are more at risk if they:

    Are over 50
    Have a family history of the condition
    Have a personal history of polyps in their bowel
    Suffer from inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease
    Lead an unhealthy lifestyle

Treatment usually involves surgery, and chemo- and radiotherapy.

More than nine out of 10 people with stage one bowel cancer survive five years or more after their diagnosis.

This drops significantly if it is diagnosed in later stages.

According to Bowel Cancer UK figures, more than 41,200 people are diagnosed with bowel cancer every year in the UK.

It affects around 40 per 100,000 adults per year in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute.

He said the results back the substantial evidence that link eating too much red and processed meats to a heightened risk of bowel cancer.

Professor Key added: 'Most previous research looked at people in the 1990s or earlier, and diets have changed significantly since then.

WHO SAYS RED MEAT RAISES THE RISK OF BOWEL CANCER?

Red meat - such as beef and lamb - 'probably increases your risk of bowel cancer', according to the NHS.

And processed meats - like sausages and bacon - carry a similar risk.

The NHS and American Institute of Cancer Research both recommend we limit our consumption to around 70g (2.4oz) a day.

These recommendations came about after the 2011 Iron and Health report from the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition concluded red and processed meat probably raise our bowel cancer risk.

However, the report could not identify the exact amounts that are safe to eat.

The same survey found the average UK adult eats 70g of red meat a day.

The World Cancer Research Fund's 2007 report Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer also said the link between red meat and the disease is 'convincing'.

The NHS therefore recommends those eating 90g or more of red meat a day lower their intake to 70g.

Source: NHS

'So our study gives a more up-to-date insight that is relevant to meat consumption today.'

The World Cancer Research Fund already warns there is strong evidence that eating processed meat causes bowel cancer.

An array of studies conducted in recent years have made the link between the killer disease and regularly eating salami, bacon and ham.

Eating a lot of red meat, such as beef, lamb and pork, is also thought to increase the risk, according to the WCRF.

The World Health Organisation classifies processed meat as carcinogenic and red meat as probably carcinogenic.

In light of the evidence, the NHS and American Institute of Cancer Research both recommend consumption is limited to around 70g (2.4oz) a day.

One rasher of bacon typically weighs 31g (1oz), a sausage is around 66g (2.3oz), and a slice of ham 20g (0.7oz).

The latest study of meat and bowel cancer, part-funded by Cancer Research UK, was published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Dr Julie Sharp, CRUK's head of health information, said: 'The Government guidelines on red and processed meat are general health advice.

'This study is a reminder that the more you can cut down beyond this, the more you can lower your chances of developing bowel cancer.

'This doesn't necessarily mean cutting out red and processed meat entirely, but you may want to think about simple ways to reduce how much you have and how often.'

Dr Sharp added: 'Although breaking habits we've had for a long time can be hard, it's never too late to make healthy changes to our diet.

'You could try doing meat-free Mondays, looking for recipes using fresh chicken and fish, or swapping meat for pulses like beans and lentils in your usual meals.'

Around 42,000 people are diagnosed with bowel cancer every year in the UK, says Bowel Cancer UK.

And the killer disease affects around 40 per 100,000 adults each year in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute.

WHAT SHOULD A BALANCED DIET LOOK LIKE?

Meals should be based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally wholegrain, according to the NHS

• Eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day. All fresh, frozen, dried and canned fruit and vegetables count

• Base meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally wholegrain

• 30 grams of fibre a day: This is the same as eating all of the following: 5 portions of fruit and vegetables, 2 whole-wheat cereal biscuits, 2 thick slices of wholemeal bread and large baked potato with the skin on

• Have some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soya drinks) choosing lower fat and lower sugar options

• Eat some beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins (including 2 portions of fish every week, one of which should be oily)

• Choose unsaturated oils and spreads and consuming in small amounts

• Drink 6-8 cups/glasses of water a day

• Adults should have less than 6g of salt and 20g of saturated fat for women or 30g for men a day

Source: NHS Eatwell Guide

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/arti ... ancer.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Apr 17, 2019 7:41 am

Scientists compared the risk between people who stick to NHS guidelines on red and processed meat consumption - 70g a day - and those who don't


Probably because NHS daily meals are so DULL that no one is tempted to eat more than enough to not starve :lol:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 17, 2019 8:40 pm

NHS meals are designed to get people out of hospital as quickly as possible :ymdevil:

The NHS is in trouble

Services have deteriorated

People who go into hospital to have a baby are sent home the same day :shock:

No longer do people have time to recover from any operations

It is disgusting X(

One of my students, whose English is not very good, was not even offered a translator at the hospital X( he does not really know what is going on :-s
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Fri Apr 19, 2019 5:23 pm

Soon bye bye veggies Lent.

For Easter meal I cook an authentic Greek moussaka (2 days of preparation) :

https://youtu.be/8U_29i9Qp5U

And I know that my sister makes a giant chocolate egg filled with chocolate mousse, Chantilly and strawberries.
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