Navigator
Facebook
Search
Ads & Recent Photos
Recent Images
Random images
Welcome To Roj Bash Kurdistan 

Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Jul 28, 2018 6:23 pm

Piling wrote:I don't like the 16/8 fast, because I don't like to lunch.

Now I test the 24 h fast :p


GOOD LUCK with that :D

I hate fasting

I think I hate fasting

I have NEVER actually tried fasting =))
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

Sponsor

Sponsor
 

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Sun Jul 29, 2018 4:56 am

It is not so difficult than people imagine. I had already done hundred of times :when I travel all day in Kurdistan, when I have a urgent work to write and no time for lunch, etc.
User avatar
Piling
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 8194
Images: 79
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:57 am
Location: France
Highscores: 2
Arcade winning challenges: 3
Has thanked: 267 times
Been thanked: 2906 times
Nationality: European

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Aug 02, 2018 2:43 am

Vegan diet: how your body changes from day one

Veganism, the plant-based diet which shuns meat and dairy, is having its time in the sun. Since 2008, there has been a 350% increase in the number of self-described vegans in the UK alone. Where this motivation stems from is varied, but includes concerns about animal welfare, worries about the environment and religious reasons.

Many people, though, seek a healthier diet. Research suggests that veganism can have health benefits, if well planned. For those who have pursued a diet rich in meat and dairy for most of their lives, embarking on a vegan diet can lead to significant changes within the body.

The first few weeks

The first thing that someone starting a vegan diet might notice is an energy boost with the removal of the processed meat that is found in many omnivorous diets, in favour of fruit, vegetables and nuts. These foods will boost your vitamin, mineral and fibre levels and thinking ahead about your meals and snacks rather than relying on convenience foods can help sustain consistent energy levels.

As time without animal products grows into weeks, there is likely to be a shift in bowel function either towards a more regular, healthy pattern or an increase in bloating, wind and loose motions. This is due to the higher fibre content of a vegan diet and the simultaneous increase in carbohydrates that ferment in the gut and can cause irritable bowel syndrome.

This may settle eventually and could lead to some positive changes in the diversity of the bacteria in the colon, depending on whether a vegan diet is made up of processed food and refined carbohydrates or is well planned and balanced. Although not proven yet, scientists believe that a high species diversity for gut bacteria could be beneficial for the whole system, in the same way that ecosystems are stronger as a result of lots of different types of species thriving.

Three to six months later

Several months into a vegan diet and some people may find that the increase in fruit and vegetables and reduced processed food can help acne to clear up. By this point however, your stores of vitamin D might be dropping as key sources of it in our diet come from meat, fish and dairy, and it isn’t always noticeable until it’s too late. Vitamin D isn’t well understood but it’s essential in keeping bones, teeth and muscles healthy and deficiency has been linked with cancer, heart disease, migraines and depression.

This is because vitamin D stores are only thought to last about two months in the body. How long your stores last will depend on the time of year that you decide to go vegan because the body can make vitamin D from sunlight. Making sure you eat plenty of fortified foods or take a supplement is important, especially in the winter months.

Within a few months, a well-balanced vegan diet which is low in salt and processed food may have impressive benefits for cardiovascular health, helping to prevent heart disease, stroke and reducing the risk of diabetes. As the intake of nutrients like iron, zinc and calcium are reduced on a vegan diet, our bodies get better at absorbing them from the intestine. The adaptation may be enough to prevent deficiencies in some people but not for everyone, in which case supplements can fill the shortfall.

From six months to several years on

Approaching a year on a vegan diet, vitamin B12 stores may become depleted. Vitamin B12 is a nutrient that is essential to the healthy functioning of blood and nerve cells and can only be found in animal products. Symptoms of B12 deficiency include breathlessness, exhaustion, poor memory and tingling in the hands and feet.

B12 deficiency is easily prevented by eating three portions of fortified food per day or taking a supplement, but managing it is very important, as any deficiency would negate the benefits of a vegan diet for heart disease and stroke risk and can cause permanent nerve and brain damage.

A few years down the line and even our bones will start to notice the change. Our skeleton is a mineral store and up until the age of 30 we can add minerals to it from our diet, but after that, our bones can’t absorb minerals anymore and so getting enough calcium when we’re young is vital.

After the age of 30, our bodies harvest the calcium from our skeleton for use in the body, and if we don’t replenish the calcium in our blood through our diet, our bones fill the deficit and become brittle as a result.

Vegetables rich in calcium like kale and brocolli may protect bones, but many vegans don’t meet their calcium requirements and there is a 30% increased risk of fracture among vegans when compared to vegetarians and omnivores. Plant-based calcium is also harder to absorb and therefore supplements or plenty of fortified foods is recommended.

When contemplating the years ahead on a vegan diet, balance is key. Well-balanced vegan diets may have major health benefits. Many of those benefits can be offset by deficiencies if the diet isn’t managed carefully, but supermarkets and food outlets are making it easier than ever to enjoy a varied and exciting vegan diet and our appetite for meat overall is declining. With the right preparation, a vegan diet can be good for human health.

https://theconversation.com/vegan-diet- ... one-100413
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Thu Aug 02, 2018 5:04 am

And 10 years later, destroyed bones and teeth, compulsive food binging, hormonal trouble causing by too much soja…


https://youtu.be/UbBgUgSGbAU
User avatar
Piling
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 8194
Images: 79
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:57 am
Location: France
Highscores: 2
Arcade winning challenges: 3
Has thanked: 267 times
Been thanked: 2906 times
Nationality: European

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Aug 02, 2018 8:28 am

Piling wrote:And 10 years later, destroyed bones and teeth, compulsive food binging, hormonal trouble causing by too much soja…

https://youtu.be/UbBgUgSGbAU


I started watching the video then realised she was making mistakes :shock:
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Aug 13, 2018 6:52 pm

Good Housekeeping reveals the foods you should NEVER store in the fridge

    Experts at Good Housekeeping Institute (GHI) share what not to keep chilled
    The foods include whole melons, as they will store well at room temperature
    You should also avoid keeping coffee in the fridge so it doesn't absorb smells
Some groceries need to be kept in the fridge or they will become mouldy or go off very quickly, particularly in the summer heat.

But there are some items that don't need to be kept chilled at all - including some groceries that many people needlessly keep in the fridge.

From melons to tomatoes, Good Housekeeping Institute (GHI) has shared with FEMAIL the foods you don't need to store at cool temperatures after all.

And if you've been keeping your coffee in the fridge, then it's time to take it out and put back in the cupboard.

1. MELONS

You can free up a lot of fridge space if you take out items that don't need to be there. Some groceries that people often keep chilled will actually store much better in a cool, dry environment (stock photo)

If you've bought a whole melon, there's no need to take up valuable fridge real estate by keeping it chilled.

Whole melons will keep well at room temperature.

It's only when you cut into them that slices should be covered in plastic wrap and stored in the fridge, according to GHI experts.

2. AVOCADOS

Avocados can be kept in the fridge, but if you're trying to ripen them, take them out.

The fruit won't ripen any further if kept chilled, so the best way to ensure they reach their full delicious potential is to store them in a brown paper bag in a cupboard.

Store them with a banana too if you want to really speed up the process, as the gas a banana gives off helps quicken the ripening process of other fruits.

3. COFFEE

Plenty of people keep coffee in the fridge, but your beans can actually absorb the food smells if kept chilled amongst your other groceries, so keep it in an airtight container instead (stock photo)

Where to store coffee is a controversial topic, with some adamant that it belongs in the fridge once it's been opened.

But experts say that coffee should never be kept chilled amongst your other groceries, as it will absorb the smells.

Instead, they recommend you store it in an airtight container in a cupboard to prevent it from going stale.

4. GARLIC

It may be tempting to store your garlic in the fridge because it makes it easier to find, but there's no need to keep it chilled.

It does best in a dry, ventilated area.

5. TOMATOES

Tomatoes will actually taste better if kept at room temperature on the kitchen counter or on a kitchen windowsill, according to GHI experts

A key ingredient in many salads, you might think tomatoes belong in the fridge.

But in fact, tomatoes taste better at room temperature and should not be kept chilled at all.

Store them on the counter or the windowsill, and you might find that your tomatoes taste more flavoursome.

They may not last quite as long, but as long as you eat them up in a couple of days after purchase, they should be fine.

6. BREAD

There are some people still storing their bread in the fridge, so GH experts have urged them to stop.

Keeping bread chilled makes it go stale very quickly, so keep it in a dry, cool place.

7. CAKE

Unless it contains fresh cream, the delicious cake you've just bought or made does not belong in the fridge.

Keep it in a cool, dark place, like a cake tin, and it will last for three days.

But if you keep it in the fridge, the sponge will go stale in a matter of hours.

8. ONIONS

Much like garlic, onions do not need to be kept chilled.

In fact, they will store much better if they are kept in a dry, ventilated area, according to GHI.

It's also best to keep them somewhere dark, as otherwise they will sprout.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/ ... ridge.html
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Aug 13, 2018 7:00 pm

Weedkiller ingredient that left an American
man with terminal cancer found in

BREAD and CEREAL

    Traces of weedkiller ingredient glyphosate found in Cheerios and Corn flakes
    Use of the chemical by British farmers has increased by 400 per cent in 20 years
    The European Union re-licensed its use for another five years last November
A key ingredient in a weedkiller linked to cancer has also been found in loaves of bread and cereal.

An American man who blames his terminal cancer on Roundup weedkiller was last week awarded £226million in damages.

Traces of glyphosate were found in nearly two in three loaves of wholemeal bread in the UK, according to official research.

A key ingredient in weedkiller linked to cancer has been found in loaves of bread and cereal (file photo)

Glyphosate has also been found in Cheerios and Kellogg's Corn Flakes in the US, as well as Doritos crisps and Ritz crackers.

The chemical is the world's most widely used weedkiller, and use by British farmers has increased by a shocking 400 per cent in the last 20 years, according to the Soil Association, which campaigns for organic farming.

But despite a World Health Organisation agency judging it a 'probable human carcinogen', the EU relicensed its use for another five years last November.

Now a landmark court case, brought by Dewayne Johnson in California, has seen long-term use of Roundup blamed for his non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Doctors say that the former school groundsman, 46, may only have a few months left to live.

A US jury awarded him £226million in damages on Friday after an eight-week trial.

They concluded that Roundup was the direct cause of his terminal blood cell cancer and that Monsanto – the company that makes them – had failed to warn him of the health risk from exposure.

Monsanto insists its products are safe and will appeal. However, the case raises new questions about the use of the chemical on food crops.

It was even found at low levels in Ben & Jerry's ice creams by a study last year.

Official research suggests a third of UK cereal crops, such as wheat and barley, are sprayed with glyphosate.

It is used to kill weeds and as a drying agent on the plants, which makes them easier to harvest.

Its use was found to be at levels well below the safety limits set by European and American food watchdogs.

UK retailers, including Homebase and B&Q, are reviewing whether to continue selling the weedkiller to gardeners against the background of academic studies and consumer campaigns highlighting health concerns.

Glyphosate has also been linked to liver and kidney disease, infertility, and birth abnormalities.

Following the US court verdict, Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson tweeted: 'American jury finds glyphosate causes cancer. It's the most used agricultural chemical ever. This finding has huge implications for the food chain.'

The Soil Association's head of policy, Emma Hockridge, described the ruling as a 'dramatic blow' to the pesticide industry. She said: 'We need to urgently change our systems of weed control to stop relying on herbicides.'

However, the National Farmers' Union (NFU) said there is no need to review use of the pesticide.

Its deputy president, Guy Smith, also a livestock and arable farmer, said it had previously been ruled safe to use and 'the opinion of a Californian jury' shouldn't change that.

Monsanto's vice president Scott Partridge said hundreds of studies have shown glyphosate does not cause cancer.

'It is completely and totally safe, and the public should not be concerned about this verdict,' he said.

Therese Coffey's (pictured) comment was seen as an attempt to get behind British farmers, who rely heavily on the use of Roundup's main ingredient glyphosate

Environment minister Therese Coffey last night gave her backing to Roundup weedkiller despite it being blamed for causing cancer by a US court.

Alongside a picture of the bottle, she tweeted: 'Getting ready to deploy the amazing Roundup!'

Dr Coffey's stand was seen as an attempt to get behind British farmers, who rely heavily on the use of the weedkiller's main ingredient glyphosate for crops such as wheat and barley.

But her message drew an angry response from some followers who suggested the minister was disregarding the evidence.

Doubling down, she then wrote: 'Like a lot of chemicals and pesticides, you handle appropriately to manage the risk. Just like you do with bleach and other household chemicals.'

One person complained: 'There speaks the voice of inexpertise.'

Another wrote: 'Bold assurance... given that there'll likely be group action. Do you own shares?'

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... EREAL.html
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:08 pm

Dietitian shares the EXACT daily meal plan to follow to melt unwanted kilos from your body fast

Fat loss food diary: Dietitian shares the EXACT daily meal plan to follow to melt unwanted kilos from your body fast – without 'crazy restrictions'

Brisbane dietitian Leanne Ward shared the food diary she follows for fat loss
She revealed she eats as many as six small meals a day to melt unwanted kilos
Leanne said you can shed fat without following any 'crazy restrictions'
Previously, Leanne has shared her tips for meal prepping for good health

In the quest to lose weight, many women can struggle to shake that last little bit of fat, whether it's on their stomachs, hips or bums.

But one dietitian is out to show you that it needn't be difficult and you don't have to starve yourself in order to be slim.

Leanne Ward, from Brisbane - who specialises in dispelling some of the myths surrounding food and diet - recently shared the exact meal plan she follows to melt unwanted kilos from her body fast.

And best of all, the food diary involves no 'crazy restrictions' whatsoever.

Leanne Ward - who specialises in dispelling some of the myths surrounding food and diet - recently shared the exact meal plan she follows to melt unwanted kilos from her body fast

When she's trying to shed fat fast, the 28-year-old confessed she'll eat six small meals each day, starting early in the morning

'I've had heaps of messages from you guys about meal plans for fat loss so here's a documented version of the food I eat when I'm aiming to stay lean,' Leanne, 28, revealed on her Instagram page.

'I'm not saying this is how everyone should eat - I just wanted to give you guys an idea of what works for my body.'

When she's trying to shed fat fast, the 28-year-old confessed she'll eat six small meals each day, starting early in the morning.

'My first meal is rolled oats with skim milk, hot water, vanilla protein powder, chia seeds and a tablespoon of peanut butter,' she explained.

Leanne said she swears by the 80:20 approach to food and 'eating the rainbow' or a diet rich in different colours

The second 'meal' is somewhat like a snack, and looks like a medium soy cappuccino, which Leanne enjoys at work with a banana.

'My third meal might be roasted sweet potato, chicken, olives, cheese and a dressing of olive oil, lemon juice and black pepper,' Leanne said.

Mid afternoon, she'll have a mandarin and a high fibre muesli bar.

'Early evening, I'll have a high fibre wrap with tuna, salad and cheese, with one kiwi fruit,' Leanne said.

She'll follow this with high protein yoghurt and a tablespoon of granola.

I never starve myself or restrict my calories too drastically,' Leanne concluded.

'Also, I don't follow any crazy restrictions like eliminating carbs or fat or dairy or gluten.

'I believe in eating the rainbow, eating a large variety of foods daily and listening to your body. The 80: 20 approach has always been my favourite - if you make the basis of your diet wholefoods then there's always room for occasional treats, too.'

Leanne explained that the key to healthy eating is to create an 'environment to match your goals - she removes all processed foods from the house, lays out her exercise gear the night before and pre-cuts fruit and vegetables for healthy snacks

Speaking previously to FEMAIL, Leanne revealed she is 6ft tall and weighs 72 kilograms.

She trains with weights four times a week and does some form of cardio twice a week, whether that is netball or high intensity interval training.

Leanne explained that the key to healthy eating is to create an 'environment to match your goals'.

'It's hard to make healthier choices and do more physical activity if our environments aren't supportive of this,' she said.

'My favourite tips include removing processed foods from the house, laying out exercise gear the night before, pre-cutting vegetable sticks or fresh fruit for healthy snacks on the run or a weekly meal prep.'

The dietitian frequently shows off her own meal prepping skills, for which she sets aside an hour or two on a Sunday afternoon to get ready.

'My meals for the next three days are loaded with fibre, protein & healthy fats,' Leanne accompanied one recent meal prepping post.

'These three nutrients I find essential for keeping you full and achieving successful weight loss!'.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... -fast.html
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:17 pm

£1 creams that claim to get rid of wrinkles:
Biochemist gives her verdict on which bargain anti-agers actually work

    Claire Coleman and biochemist Nausheen Qureshi compared anti-ageing items
    This week High Street chain Poundland launched their own skincare range
    Nausheen says despite good ingredients the products won't make a difference
    She was impressed by Asda's NSPA range for ingredients and packaging
For years, women have been led to believe good skincare should cost the Earth — and never is this more true than when buying anti-ageing products that will have an impact on the fine lines, sagging and pigmentation we associate with getting older.

But, this week, budget retailer Poundland turned that theory on its head by launching a range of anti-ageing skincare called #6, in packaging that doesn’t look a million miles away from the colours of Boots’s coveted No 7 Protect & Perfect.

So, can a ‘cheap-as-chips’ anti-ageing range deliver? We picked seven of the cheapest around and asked formulating biochemist Nausheen Qureshi (nausheen qureshi.com), who creates skincare for some of the most well-known doctors and facialists in the UK, for her verdict . . .

POUNDLAND # 6

Six products — a day cream, a night cream, an eye cream, a serum, a collagen filler and a micellar cleansing water — designed to fight the signs of ageing. Every item costs just £1.

PACKAGING: Minimalist, although the tubs do feel a bit cheap.

FRAGRANCE: Reminiscent of bathroom air freshener, but not entirely unpleasant.

INGREDIENTS: With collagen, ceramides, vitamins A and E, peptides, algae extracts and oils, they’re talking a good game. But the day cream has no SPF, which, for an anti-ageing range, is a bit of a black mark, as the sun is a major wrinkle culprit.

‘One reason Poundland can drive down prices is that the base for all the products is almost identical,’ says Nausheen.

‘That’s the case with most budget ranges, so you don’t get much variety of texture and product. They use a collagen molecule, which superficially tightens skin, rather than a peptide, which stimulates collagen production, and small amounts of other active ingredients.’

VERDICT: Good ingredients, but the amount won’t make a serious difference. Really, these are just cheap, decent moisturisers. 4/5

HEMA HELLO MIRROR GUESS MY AGE

Dutch store Hema sells everything from cookery gadgets to towels, but who knew its anti- ageing skincare range had such a broad base?

There are products for the 60-plus market and a range for 40-plus, comprising a day cream, night cream, serum and eye cream. Hema also offers a wrinkle filler cream. Each is £6.50 or less.

PACKAGING: Clean and modern, with boxes in shades of monochrome, red, white and silver.

FRAGRANCE: Not unpleasant, but with a slightly sour note.

INGREDIENTS: Pretty impressive. The day cream has SPF 10 and the day and night creams and serum also contain the collagen-boosting peptide Matrixyl Synte 6, similar to those in Boots’s Protect & Perfect.

However, ‘it’s good that Hema is using peptides, rather than collagen, but at such low concentrations, I’m not sure whether it’s worth having them in the products at all,’ says Nausheen.

‘There’s quite a lot of silicone, which gives a more luxurious feel, but the base of the Poundland products is simpler, so any actives are likely to be more effective.’

VERDICT: At six times the price of the Poundland products, you’re definitely not getting a product that’s six times better. 3/5

SAINSBURY’S MY SKIN MATTERS

Four anti-ageing products: a day cream, night cream, serum and eye gel, costing £4 each.

PACKAGING: Dated . . . turquoise and purple makes it look like a range for acne-prone teenagers.

FRAGRANCE: It is subtly floral, but the night cream smells of Play-Doh.

Ingredients: SPF 15 in the day cream gets a big thumbs-up and the eye cream and serum both contain ingredients proven to be effective at anti-ageing, such as niacinamide (to prevent water loss and boost collagen production) and caffeine.

The day and night creams have ingredients which, it is claimed, boost collagen and elastin — but when Nausheen looked at the ingredients list, she struggled to see what would have this effect.

‘There’s an amino acid called arginine in the day cream, which might help,’ she says, ‘but I can’t see anything in the night cream that substantiates the claim of boosting collagen and elastin.’

She thought the niacinamide levels in the serum and eye cream too low to be effective.

VERDICT: The glycerin and shea butter will moisturise, but don’t expect much more. 1/5

ASDA NSPA

This range is exclusive to Asda, but developed by The Mibelle Group — known for creating stem cell ingredients from apples that, a few years ago, were in almost every anti-ageing product. This age-defying collection includes day and night creams, serums and eye cream, all under £7.

PACKAGING: Elegant cream and taupe boxes.

FRAGRANCE: Subtle, but warm, spicy and spa-like.

INGREDIENTS: ‘This range has very good actives in it,’ says Nausheen. ‘There’s an interesting mix of peptides, vitamin E and hyaluronic acid, but again, I’m not sure they’re at high enough levels to make a significant difference. That’s not to say you won’t get any results — just that they won’t be as good as if you had used more.’

VERDICT: Little to choose between this and Hema, but Asda’s more sophisticated fragrance and packaging edges it. 4/5

ALDI LACURA CELLSATION

Aldi’s new range is ‘premium skincare’ for the 50-plus and includes a day cream, a night cream and a regenerating serum, £6.99 each.

PACKAGING: The bronze-and-gold bling resembles L’Oreal’s Age Perfect range.

FRAGRANCE: A lot like Nivea.

INGREDIENTS: SPF 15 in the day cream is a plus. The products all have Celligent, which, in lab tests, has been shown to protect skin’s stem cells and DNA from UV damage.

But Nausheen isn’t overly impressed. ‘If you protect your skin, you’re protecting your DNA,’ she says, ‘so I’d rather they’d used a credible peptide than Celligent. I do like that they’ve used different ingredients, such as olive oil.’

VERDICT: Almost good — swap the Celligent for peptides and tone down the blingy packaging. 3/5

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... -work.html
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Aug 17, 2018 2:38 am

Low-carb diets could shorten life, study suggests

A low-carb diet could shorten life expectancy by up to four years, a study suggests

Low-carb diets, such as Atkins, have become increasingly popular for weight loss and have shown promise for lowering the risk of some illnesses.

But a US study over 25 years indicates that a moderate cut in carb consumption - or switching meat for plant-based protein and fats - is healthier.

The study relied on people remembering the amount of carbohydrates they ate.

'Gaining widespread popularity'

In the study, published in The Lancet Public Health, 15,400 people from the US filled out questionnaires on the food and drink they consumed, along with portion sizes.

From this, scientists estimated the proportion of calories they got from carbohydrates, fats, and protein.

After following the group for an average of 25 years, researchers found that those who got 50-55% of their energy from carbohydrates (the moderate carb group and in line with UK dietary guidelines) had a slightly lower risk of death compared with the low and high-carb groups.

Carbohydrates include vegetables, fruit and sugar but the main source of them is starchy foods, such as potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and cereals.

Researchers estimated that, from the age of 50, people in the moderate carb group were on average expected to live for another 33 years.

This was:

    four years more than people who got 30% or less of their energy from carbs (extra-low-carb group)
    2.3 years more than the 30%-40% (low-carb) group
    1.1 years more than the 65% or more (high-carb) group
The findings were similar to previous studies the authors compared their work with, which included more than 400,000 people from more than 20 countries.

The scientists then compared low-carb diets rich in animal proteins and fats with those that contained lots of plant-based protein and fat.

They found that eating more beef, lamb, pork, chicken and cheese in place of carbs was linked with a slightly increased risk of death.

But replacing carbohydrates with more plant-based proteins and fats, such as legumes and nuts, was actually found to slightly reduce the risk of mortality.

Dr Sara Seidelmann, clinical and research fellow in cardiovascular medicine from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, who led the research, said: "Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with protein or fat are gaining widespread popularity as a health and weight-loss strategy.

"However, our data suggests that animal-based low carbohydrate diets, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, might be associated with shorter overall life span and should be discouraged.

"Instead, if one chooses to follow a low carbohydrate diet, then exchanging carbohydrates for more plant-based fats and proteins might actually promote healthy ageing in the long term."

'Not enough to focus on nutrients'

The authors speculate that Western-type diets that restrict carbohydrates often result in lower intake of vegetables, fruit, and grains and lead to greater consumption of animal proteins and fats, which have been linked to inflammation and ageing in the body.

Prof Nita Forouhi, from the MRC epidemiology unit at University of Cambridge, who was not involved in the study, said: "A really important message from this study is that it is not enough to focus on the nutrients, but whether they are derived from animal or plant sources.

"When carbohydrate intake is reduced in the diet, there are benefits when this is replaced with plant-origin fat and protein food sources, but not when replaced with animal-origin sources such as meats."

However, there are limitations to the study.

The findings show observational associations rather than cause-and-effect and what people ate was based on self-reported data, which might not be accurate.

And the authors acknowledge that since diets were measured only at the start of the trial and six years later, dietary patterns could have changed over the subsequent 19 years.

Prof Tom Sanders, professor emeritus of nutrition and dietetics at King's College London, also pointed out that the use of a food questionnaire in the study led to people underestimating the calories and fat they had eaten.

"One explanation for the finding in this and the other US studies is that it may reflect the higher risk of death in the overweight/obese, who may fall into two popular diet camps - those favouring a high-meat/low-carbohydrate diet and those favouring a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet," he added.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-45195474
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Fri Aug 17, 2018 6:02 am

I follow the Julia Child diet :lol:
User avatar
Piling
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 8194
Images: 79
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:57 am
Location: France
Highscores: 2
Arcade winning challenges: 3
Has thanked: 267 times
Been thanked: 2906 times
Nationality: European

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:41 pm

Piling wrote:I follow the Julia Child diet :lol:


What is the Julia Child and do I have to eat snails and frogs legs :ymdevil:
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Sat Aug 18, 2018 4:12 am

User avatar
Piling
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 8194
Images: 79
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:57 am
Location: France
Highscores: 2
Arcade winning challenges: 3
Has thanked: 267 times
Been thanked: 2906 times
Nationality: European

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Aug 18, 2018 2:37 pm



Does that include the Devil's food cake :ymdevil:

Click image to enlarge
979

If so I am joining myself :D
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 20051
Images: 354
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 5865 times
Been thanked: 715 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Sat Aug 18, 2018 5:39 pm

No, it was my American/English cakes' time. I am also very interested by English and American cooks.
User avatar
Piling
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 8194
Images: 79
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:57 am
Location: France
Highscores: 2
Arcade winning challenges: 3
Has thanked: 267 times
Been thanked: 2906 times
Nationality: European

PreviousNext

Return to Food

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot]

cron
x

#{title}

#{text}