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Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Dec 24, 2017 5:26 pm

NO ROAST POTATOES !!!

No roast potatoes, a twentieth of a mince pie and quarter of a glass of bubbly: What UK Government health chiefs say you should be eating when you sit down for Christmas dinner

    The Taxpayers' Alliance has calculated what a traditional Christmas dinner would look like if Public Health England (PHE) was in charge of portions

    Nutritional guidelines would allow an adult male just a few slices of turkey

    Chocoholics have to content themselves with a quarter of a fun-size Mars bar

Many of us are looking forward to tucking into a traditional roast turkey with all the trimmings this Christmas.

But if health chiefs were in charge of your yuletide meal it would be a much less indulgent affair.

The Taxpayers' Alliance has calculated what a Christmas dinner would look like if Public Health England (PHE) decided on the portions - and it's almost unrecognisable.

870
Nutritional guidelines would allow an adult male just a few slices of turkey, a half-serving of boiled potatoes and a twentieth of a mince pie

Nutritional guidelines would allow an adult male just a few slices of turkey, a half-serving of boiled potatoes and a twentieth of a mince pie.

Alcohol is also strictly limited to just a quarter of a glass of champagne and three quarters of a glass of wine.

And chocoholics would have to content themselves with just a quarter of a fun-size Mars bar.

This year, PHE has spent over £40 million of taxpayers' money telling Brits what they can and cannot eat, drink and do in their leisure time.

871
Many of us are looking forward to tucking into a traditional roast turkey with all the trimmings this Christmas

John O'Connell, Chief Executive of the Taxpayers' Alliance, said: 'All year long taxpayer-funded public health Tsars tell us what to eat, drink and how to spend our leisure time.

'If they had it their way, we would be eating nothing but salad and Brussels sprouts this Christmas, with a meagre sliver of a mince pie for pudding.

'I wonder if public health officials this year will be practicing what they preach by following their own healthy eating guidelines?'

Approved amount:

Breakfast

    Smoked salmon 75 grams
    Eggs 1 egg
    Bread 1 slice
    Butter 5 grams
    Advent calendar chocolate Quarter of a fun-size Mars bar

Lunch

    Turkey 125 grams
    Gravy 56.25 grams
    Boiled potatoes Half serving
    Pigs in blankets 1 quarter chipolata
    Sprouts 25 grams
    Broccoli 25 grams
    Carrots 25 grams
    Parsnips 25 grams

Dessert

    Christmas pudding Tenth of a serving
    Brandy cream 15 millilitres
    Brie 30 grams
    Stilton 15 grams
    Nuts 30 grams
    Pate 30 grams
    Crisps 30 grams
    Mince pie Twentieth of a mince pie
    Custard Twentieth of a serving
    Goose fat (cooking) 15 grams
    Additional salt (cooking) None

Drinks

    Orange juice Tenth of a glass
    Wine Three quarters of a glass
    Champagne Quarter of a glass
    G&T Quarter of a glass
    Port Quarter of a glass
    Brandy Quarter of a glass

Dinner

    Turkey sandwich Half a sandwich

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... stmas.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Sun Dec 24, 2017 6:40 pm

Lol, you guys, you would collapse if you eat at a French table for Christmas :lol:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Dec 24, 2017 6:44 pm

Piling wrote:Lol, you guys, you would collapse if you eat at a French table for Christmas :lol:


You will have to show us what French people eat for Christmas :D
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Sun Dec 24, 2017 6:56 pm

This night :

Appetizers : toasts with liver pâté, rabbit pie and salmon pâté

Starters : small pies with apples, white sausages and goat cheese

Meal : roasted stuffed capon and "pommes bataille" (French fries but with cubes of potatoes)

Brie de Meaux

Foie gras

Ice buche

Drinks : Champagne, Cahors (red wine) Troussepine (white sweet wine).

Tomorrow Lunch :

Appetizers :

Small things of puff pastry stuffed with something (leftovers of eve meal)

Salmon terrine

roasted quails and potatoes

Brie, foie gras

Green lemon sorbet with fresh kakis and Jasmin marmelade.

Same wines.

In general, each meals lasts 5-6 hours.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Dec 24, 2017 8:12 pm

Yours looks much more interesting than ours :D

Our celebration meals last 2 hours at the most :lol:

We have lots of office parties and go out for lots of traditional roast turkey meals for 2 weeks before Christmas up until the News Year

By the time the New Years starts we have all had enough of roast turkey :ymsick: and do not eat it again until the next Christmas

We do not go out to parties much before 11pm and party until morning :ymdevil:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Dec 24, 2017 8:16 pm

We have a new tradition now:

We watch Father Christmas on our phones as he delivers presents :ymhug:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:15 pm

Food makes up half of all imports in cash-strapped Kurdistan

Food items make up about half of all goods imported into the Kurdistan Region as people with less money in their wallets focus on essentials.

“Due to the economic crisis, peoples’ financial ability has declined. That is why people nowadays buy mostly food. This has led to an increase in food imports. Imports of electronic, electricity, building and furniture items come after food imports,” Nawzad Adham, director general at the Ministry of Trade and Industry, told Rudaw.

The majority of food consumed in the Kurdistan Region is imported, according to Adham, who added that though food items make up the bulk of goods brought into the Region, food imports have declined by 22 percent compared to peak levels in 2014.

The majority of imports come through the Ibrahim Khalil gate on the Kurdistan Region-Turkey border.

“Due to the economic crisis, sales of food items have dropped a bit too, but are still better compared to sales of other goods. Our monthly sales of food items reach $22 million,” said Haji Qasim Ibrahim, representative of a Turkish import company.

Oil, rice, sugar, tomato sauce and spaghetti, and beans, are the top-demanded items, Ibrahim detailed.

Recent years have seen an increase in the number of food import companies registered in the Kurdistan Region, including Turkish and Iranian companies promoting sale of their goods in Kurdistan.

Ministry officials claim that most of the food items imported to the Kurdistan Region are later exported to Iraqi cities.

However, trader Ibrahim, who has good relations with Arab traders, said: “Only 30 percent of these goods are exported to Iraqi cities because cities in the south mainly use Iranian goods because of their cheap price. But the Sunnis mostly use Turkish goods. This difference exists even in Kurdistan. According to our study, 90 percent of people in Duhok use Turkish goods, 80 percent in Erbil, and 60 percent in Sulaimani.”

The KRG imposes some fees on imported agricultural products in order to protect and assist local farmers, but is far from reaching self-sufficiency.

Dr. Khalis Ahmed Hamadamin, a senior official at the Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources, told Rudaw that his ministry is committed to boosting domestic production and reducing dependence on imports, “But due to the small budget dedicated to us last year, in terms of quality and quantity we have reached self-sufficiency only in strategic products like wheat, potatoes, and onions.”

According to the ministry’s figures, the Kurdistan Region produces about 73 percent of the chicken it consumes, less than half of its red meat, just over half of its milk, and 78 percent of its fish.

The Region has the infrastructure to be self-sufficient in terms of eggs and chicken if all its projects are brought online, Hamadamin said.

In terms of lentils and rice, the Kurdistan Region is far behind reaching demands, producing just 17 percent of lentils consumed and a mere 3 percent of rice consumed.

Hamadamin said the Region does not have the water resources needed in order to grow the lentils and rice, but argues that better financial support would help the situation.

He said growing sugar cane and sunflowers would also help to meet sugar and oil demands locally.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/business/11012018
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jan 16, 2018 7:16 pm

The home health remedies we rely on: From sleeping in socks filled with onions to shake off a cold, to banishing baldness with turmeric – but how many REALLY work?


    Survey found gargling with salt water to ease a sore throat was the top DIY 'cure'

    Followed by sweating out a cold and having a nightcap to help you sleep

    'Hair of the dog' to cure a hangover and olive oil for earache are also common

    Mail Online investigates if these remedies work or if they just old wives' tales

    Buttering burns to ease pain

    Sleeping in socks filled with onions to shake off a cold

    Rubbing turmeric on your scalp to combat baldness

Those above have emerged as some of the UK's bizarre home remedies in a survey.

The top three DIY 'cures' for dealing with illness and ailments are gargling with salty water to ease a sore throat, sweating out a cold and having a nightcap to help you sleep.

'Hair of the dog' – that is having another drink – to cure a hangover, putting olive oil in your ear to ease earache, and eating carrots to improve your eyesight are other common methods relied on.

People also put their faith in using seawater to clean a cut and rubbing lemon juice onto an insect bite to stop the itchiness, according to PharmacyOutlet.co.uk which surveyed more than 2,000 UK adults.

But do these remedies work or are they just old wives' tales with no scientific basis? Mail Online investigates...

HOW MANY HAVE TRIED THE TOP 12 HOME HEALTH REMEDIES?

    Gargling salty water to ease a sore throat – 56 per cent

    Sweating out a cold – 47 per cent

    Having a nightcap to help you sleep – 44 per cent

    'Hair of the dog' to combat a hangover – 36 per cent

    Putting olive oil in your ear to fight earache or remove earwax – 33 per cent

    Eating carrots to improve your eyesight – 32 per cent

    Using seawater to clean a cut – 21 per cent

    Applying butter to a burn to relieve the pain – 19 per cent

    Rubbing lemon juice onto an insect bite to stop the itchiness – 14 per cent

    Wearing socks with onions in overnight to combat a cold – 8 per cent

    Urinating on a jellyfish sting to relieve the pain – 8 per cent

    Rubbing turmeric powder into your scalp to prevent baldness – 5 per cent

'Hair of the dog' to combat a hangover

Many people swear that 'hair of the dog that bit you' – that is having an alcoholic drink – is the best hangover cure.

But unfortunately, there is no scientific evidence that having another tipple will stop you feeling rough after a bout of heavy drinking, according to Dr Emeka Okorocha.

In the liver, alcohol is broken down into a toxic chemical called acetaldehyde. An enzyme, alcohol dehydrogenase, further metabolises it into acetic acid.

If the amount of alcohol you consume outpaces the ability of your enzymes to process it, acetaldehyde builds up in your body, leading to headaches and nausea.

Dr Okorocha explained that hangover symptoms – usually some combination of headache, thirst, fatigue, dizziness, nausea and general grumpiness – reach their peak when the blood-alcohol level hits zero.

He told the BBC that there is no escaping this process. While having another drink may temporarily make you feel a bit better, it merely postpones the symptoms until later in the day.

Putting olive oil in your ear to ease earache or remove wax

If wax builds-up, your ears may feel dry, itchy or painful and you might experience some hearing loss.

Many believe a couple of drops of olive oil in the ear canal can help to soften the wax.

Indeed, the NHS website recommends it. It states: 'Usually earwax falls out on its own. If it doesn't and blocks your ear, put two to three drops of olive or almond oil in your ear twice a day for a few days.

The NHS recommends a couple of drops of olive oil in the ear canal can help to soften the wax – but GP Dr Martin Scurr suggests seeing an expert if you suffer earache (stock image)

'Over two weeks lumps of earwax should fall out of your ear, especially at night when you're lying down.'

However, GP Dr Martin Scurr, who has been treating patients for more than 30 years, warns against any home remedies including olive oil if you're suffering from earache as 'until there's been an assessment of what is in there, you simply do not know what you are dealing with'.

He told Mail Online: 'The ear is so delicate you need someone who knows what they are doing to peer in with the correct viewing instrument.'

Eating carrots to improve your eyesight

Generations of children have had to be cajoled into eating their carrots with the promise that the vegetables are good for their eyesight.

The idea has its roots in a World War II propaganda campaign. During the war, the British Royal Air Force developed a new type of radar technology that helped pilots shoot down German enemy planes at night.

But in order to keep the new technology a secret, the government said carrots were behind the pilots' success.

According to an article published by Berkeley Wellness, produced in collaboration with the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, this is partly true.

'Carrots are rich in beta carotene, which the body converts to a form of vitamin A called 'retinal,' a key molecule involved in maintaining normal vision,' its expert Densie Webb wrote.

'But unless you are deficient in vitamin A, as from a poor diet, malabsorption problems, or alcoholism, for example, beta carotene (or vitamin A) won't make bad vision better.'

'As it is, most Americans get enough beta carotene and vitamin A in their diets, though in some developing countries, vision loss due to a lack of these nutrients is much more common.'

Indeed, research by the University of Miami in the US in 2016 fund that eating grapes could reduce the risk of going blind later in life.

The fruit is rich in antioxidants that protect healthy cells from DNA damage which protect against a chemical process known as oxidative stress, which releases harmful molecules called free radicals into the retina, the study found.

Gargling salty water to sooth a sore throat

Mothers and grandmothers around the globe repeat the belief that gargling with warm salty water is a surefire way to relieve a sore throat.

It turns out, they are right: Not only does it provide symptomatic relief, it has preventative benefits too.

That's according to Dr Sorana Segal-Maurer, chief of the Dr James J Rahal Jr Division of Infectious Disease at New York Hospital Queens.

Dr Sorana Segal-Maurer says gargling with salty water will provide symptomatic relief of a sore throat and has preventative benefits too (stock image)

She told Web MD: 'You're creating a high-salt barrier and you're pulling out a lot of fluids from the tissues in the throat area, so you're washing the virus out.

'The salt functions as a magnet for water. It's good for symptomatic relief. And you end up swallowing some of it, so it's sort of helping you with dehydration as well.'

However, gargling with warm salt water won't magically fix your sore throat. 'It's certainly not going to cure a viral infection,' said Dr Segal-Maurer. 'It's not enough [salt] to have an antiviral effect.'

Sweating out a cold

It's a common belief that getting sweaty can speed up recovery from a cold or the flu – with some even recommending you hit the gym or sauna.

A fever is your body's natural way of killing a virus – and it's thought that keeping your temperature raised can aid the process.

Forcing your body to heat up in a bid to sweat out a cold is not a good idea.

However, Dr Ronald McCoy of The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners told bodyandsoul.com.au 'You won't get rid of a cold by sweating it out.

He said that while sometimes our body naturally develops a high temperature in order to get rid of an illness, forcing it to heat up won't help.

Having a nightcap to help you sleep

A drink before bed might help you drift off to sleep, but in the long run, experts say, it would most likely cause tossing and turning throughout the night.

Alcohol is a depressant that contributes to poor quality sleep later on, studies have shown.

Drinking alcohol can help you fall asleep faster but impairs the quality of your sleep later on, studies show (stock image)

As the night goes on you spend less time in this deep sleep and more time than usual in the less restful, rapid eye movement (REM) stage of sleep, according to a study by Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, US, in 2001.

This can leave you feeling tired the next day no matter how long you stay in bed.

John Arnedt, clinical assistant professor at the Sleep and Chronophysiology Laboratory at the University of Michigan, told WebMD that any benefit of alcohol's sleep-inducing effects wears off within just a few days.

After a few nights of regular imbibing, your body builds up a tolerance to alcohol's effects.

Using seawater to clean a cut

Most of us have been told that swimming in the sea will help heal a sore or cut.

But numerous stories have also appeared in the press about people contracting a flesh-eating disease after swimming in the ocean.

But there is no simple answer, according infectious disease and tropical infection expert Professor Bart Currie.

Saline helps in wound management but the ocean is not sterile, warns an expert.

While it's true salt water – that is saline – has long been used in wound management, the salt water in the ocean is not sterile.

'The evidence base for sores and wounds and being in the sea is not clear because situations are very different based on a number of factors,' Professor Currie, head of the Royal Darwin Hospital Infectious Diseases Department Darwin in Australia, told ABC Health & Wellbeing.

He said before you head into the ocean with an open wound, you should consider the health of your immune system, the state of the wound, the conditions of the ocean in which you are swimming and whether you are in the tropics.

Applying butter to a burn to relieve the pain

According to the Dermatology Clinic at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, it is very important to immediately cool the skin after receiving a burn. This helps stop the damage from the burning process.

Putting butter or other greasy ointments on burnt skin may make things worse.

Putting butter or other greasy ointments on a burn may actually make things worse, since the grease will slow the release of heat from the skin. This causes more damage from the retained heat.

The best way to release heat from the skin is with cool water, the clinic states. Ice and ice water are too harsh and may further aggravate already damaged skin. Cool water helps to gently remove heat from the area.

Rubbing lemon juice onto an insect bite

If itchy mosquito bites are driving you nuts, a little lemon juice is said to relieve the itching.

Dr Paul Ringel, internist with Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in Chicago, told Advocate Healthcare both lemon and limes contain antibacterial and antimicrobial properties, making them a perfect solution for mosquito bites.

Lemon juice has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties and is good to treat a cut says an expert.

'The juices not only help with the itch, but they will help reduce the chances of infection,' he said. 'A word of caution, however; don’t apply the juices to the skin if you’ll be outdoors in direct sunlight as this can cause blistering.'

Wearing socks with onions in overnight to combat a cold

This idea is said to have its roots as early as the 1500s when it was believed a cut-up onion around your home could protect you from the bubonic plague.

Onions are rich in sulphuric compounds, which give them their pungent odor. According to the folklore, when placed on the feet, these compounds infiltrate the body, killing bacteria and viruses.

While many swear by sleeping with onions in your socks to combat a cold , all signs point toward it having a placebo effect.

Unsurprisingly, there has been no research to test the sock claim. Onions are known to have antibacterial properties, but according to Dr Ruth MacDonald, professor in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State University, they 'are much less effective than bleach or chemical antibiotics.'

Therefore, it seems highly unlikely that an onion in socks would not be able to draw in virus and absorb it. While many swear by the remedy, all signs point toward a case of a placebo effect.

Urinating on a jellyfish sting to relieve the pain

There's a widespread belief that urine is the best cure for a jellyfish sting. But research last year revealed it's a myth.

Urea, which is present in urine, does have beneficial effects, as it helps with tentacle removal. But the level of urea in your pee is too diluted for it to have any beneficial effect, according to the University of Hawaii at Mānoa.

The researchers revieweda whole host of home remedies that are believed to help – including shaving cream, baking soda, and alcohol – and found that only one was really a good idea: vinegar.

After a jellyfish sting, any pain and swelling can be treated with painkillers, such as paracetamol and ibuprofen, according to NHS Choices

Vinegar prevents nematocysts – which launch the little stingers that latch on to the skin and release a stream of venom – from firing off so you don't get injected with anymore venom.

If you get stung by a jellyfish, pour concentrated vinegar on the affected area, then have someone in protective gear remove the stingers with tweezers.

And while it prevents further nematocyst discharge, vinegar doesn't provide any pain relief from already injected venom.

If your sting happened to be a box jellyfish, you'll need urgent medical help as the string can kill within minutes.

Rubbing turmeric powder into your scalp to prevent baldness

Turmeric – widely used in Asia as a natural medicine for thousands of years – is believed to be an effective hair growth solution. It's active ingredient curcumin is said to be responsible for many of its healing effects.

Several internet sites refer to unnamed studies showing that curcumin has similar effect to those of finasteride, one of the most common hair loss drugs.

Turmeric is said to be an effective hair loss treatment but there is a lack of research to justify these claims.

However, the internet is awash with unsubstantiated claims about natural cures for hair loss.

There are only two clinically-proven hair loss treatments available for male pattern baldness – finasteride 1mg and minoxidil – and these are both approved by The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the UK and the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) in the US.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... -work.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:32 pm

I nearly missed it: :shock:

Please click image to enlarge:
917

World Nutella Day

The first World Nutella® Day was established by the American blogger Sara Rosso on February 5th, 2007.

Please click image to enlarge:
916

She loved Nutella so much that thought it deserved a holiday… And Nutella® fans loved it! They came together from all over the world to celebrate their passion for Nutella® on social media through photos, recipes and messages.

World Nutella® Day has become a global phenomenon with people sharing and spreading the wonder of Nutella® at home, work, and school; in their off- and on-line communities, with family, friends and fellow fans everywhere.

In 2015, Sara transferred World Nutella® Day to Ferrero (the makers of Nutella®) to help it live on and grow for years to come.

From then on, every year we search for someone with Sara’s delicious devotion to lead the fan celebration on World Nutella® Day. Let’s find out with whom we are going to celebrate this year!
world nutella day map

Please follow link to exciting Nutelia Site:
http://www.nutelladay.com/
Last edited by Anthea on Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:51 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:39 pm

On World Nutella Day 2018

Here are the best recipes, from chocolate lasagne to tasty doughnuts

BANQUET VIT FOR A KING

Method:

For the crispy noodles, preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas mark 4 and line a tray with baking parchment. In a bowl, mix the noodles and sugar, then place on the baking tray. Sprinkle over the cocoa powder and bake in the oven until crispy – approximately 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, allow to cool, then break up the noodles. Place in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

For the cheesecake mixture, use a wooden spoon to beat together the cream cheese and sifted icing sugar in a bowl until you have a creamy mixture. Stir in the Nutella, but don’t overmix as you want to keep it swirly. Spoon into 4 glasses and allow to set in the fridge for 1 hour minimum.

Serve with 2tbsp crispy spider noodles per glass.

Nutella Swirl Pots

erves 4

Prep time 5 minutes (plus 1 hour chilling)

Cooking time 30 minutes

Cals 501

These chocolate crispy noodles are about to change your life
Ingredients for the crispy spider noodles:

100g vermicelli rice noodles, cooked to packet instructions
2tbsp caster sugar
1/2tbsp cocoa powder

Link to more recipes:
https://www.ibold.net/2018/02/05/on-wor ... doughnuts/
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:46 pm

Unfortunately, Nutella is made with palm oil, which kill orang outang :D

Image

I use this one, without palm oil.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:16 pm

Humans are destroying the entire planet X(

Palm oil is in about half of all packaged products sold in the supermarket :shock:

And probably in most chocolate :sad:

But companies are changing the way they obtain palm oil

Please follow link below:

https://www.worldwildlife.org/pages/whi ... n-palm-oil

I think that deforestation should be banned

I also think that the disgusting sport of hunting and killing of wild animals for fun should be banned

I would put a worldwide ban on Halal slaughter

Most of all I would stop Turkey from destroying Hasankeyf - because in destroying Hasankeyf Turkey will be destroying animals and plants found nowhere else in the entire world
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