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Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Mon Sep 18, 2017 6:52 am

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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Sep 18, 2017 7:21 pm

Piling wrote:the best dates are Iraqi :D

http://neverwithoutmycat.blogspot.com/2 ... iraqi.html


Looks delicious :D
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Sep 18, 2017 7:34 pm

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8 Mouthwatering Cheeseburgers to try for National Cheeseburger Day

These cheeseburger variations look and taste amazing. Read on at your own risk because after you get through the list, you’ll be hankering for a big juicy cheeseburger. Try one or try a few in celebration of National Cheeseburger Day. We’ll be celebrating cheeseburgers of all types and sizes!

1. The Swiss Mushroom Burger

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Swiss cheese and mushrooms are one of those combinations that seem like they were meant to be. They flavors are extremely complimentary. Add that to a perfectly cooked juicy beef patty, tasty mayo and veggie fixings and you’ve got a party!

2. The Onion Ring BBQ Sauce Burger

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Another favorite combination of ours is onion rings and BBQ sauce. A great option if you’re looking to spice it up and have something different than the traditional ketchup, mustard and lettuce cheeseburger!

3. Cheeseburger with a Fried Egg

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Ever had a cheeseburger with a fried egg on top? If you haven’t, you’re so missing out! C’mon, just look at that yolky goodness!

4. Triple Bacon Cheeseburger

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3 meat patties, 3 cheese slices and a whole ton of bacon. Yup, this one pretty much sells itself.

5. Avocado/Guacamole Bacon Cheeseburger

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Top your bacon with avocado or guacamole spread instead of mayo if you’re trying to cut down on calories. Or if you’re like us and don’t care about calories, add guacamole and mayo and bacon and you’ve got yourself one heck of a burger!

6. Four Cheese Cheeseburger

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Let’s face it. For the cheese lover, sometimes one slice of cheese isn’t enough. Sometimes two slices of cheese isn’t enough. Sometimes 3 does it, but if your’e a real cheese lover you could be with 4 slices. Mix and match, do whatever you like! It’s your burger after all.

7. The Poutine Burger

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Poutine, a Canadian classic and a mouthful of deliciousness! While the Poutine Burger doens’t have traditional cheese slices, the cheese curds in the poutine make up for that! Oh, and it’s smothered in gravy too. That’s right, gravy.

8. The Loaded Caesar Cheeseburger

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The Cheeseburger doesn’t always have to be the main attraction. And with loaded caesars popping up all over the place, we think a little cheeseburger makes a great topping!

http://nationalcheeseburgerday.org/8-mo ... urger-day/
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:52 am

Surprisingly there is no French Cheese Burger :lol:

I am traumatized since I learnt that Americans invented the Monte Cristo sandwich, which is a vandalism against the delicious Croque-Monsieur (that they call French toast), soaked in a bum paste and poured with powdered sugar or syrup :shock: :shock: :shock:

Sugar on ham and cheese… I will never understand American or English taste for the sucré-salé.

No burgers can be better than a genuine croque monsieur :D

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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:59 pm

Caramelized Onion-Veggie Burger :D

Lentils, onions, cremini mushrooms, and breadcrumbs make up the base of this tasty burger. Even though it's vegetarian, it still delivers 14 grams of energizing protein plus essential minerals. One cup of lentils packs 35% of your daily iron needs, which is great news since up to 20% of us are iron-deficient. We love the taste of creamy, crumbled goat cheese on top, which provides both protein and calcium. But, if you're making burgers for a vegan, be sure to leave it off.

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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Sep 20, 2017 6:33 am

I give all these burgers for a good jambon-beurre

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2 years I did not eat ham or saucisson sec. :sad:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:04 am

Piling wrote:2 years I did not eat ham or saucisson sec. :sad:

:ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause: :ymapplause:

I am very happy that you have stopped eating Babe :ymhug:

I can never understand why people are against eating dogs but are happy to eat pigs :shock:

Pigs are really intelligent animals, far more intelligent than dogs and deserve much better treatment :ymhug:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:47 am

If I did not eat pork, it is against my will, for it is hard to find some in Kurdistan.

I eat only chicken and fish, like my cats.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:51 am

Piling wrote:If I did not eat pork, it is against my will, for it is hard to find some in Kurdistan.


And there I was thinking you had given up eating pigs to protect the pig population =)) :lol: =))

Piling wrote:I eat only chicken and fish, like my cats.


Same as me - and you have to admit your cats are fit and healthy :ymhug:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Sep 20, 2017 2:13 pm

Some people say that pork is a poison for cats. Piling loved that meat and he died at 16. So it might be the uncooked pork (raw tomatoes and potatoes are also toxic for cats).
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Sep 20, 2017 6:34 pm

I cannot picture a cat eating a raw potato - I wonder how they discovered raw potatoes and raw tomatoes are toxic for cats :-?

They probably had some cats in a cages and fed them a variety of different foods waiting to see which foods killed them :-s
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Oct 01, 2017 7:44 pm

Left paralysed from Fluoroquinolone antibiotic toxicity

Experts say, the antibiotic linked to toxicity that's left many chronically ill, should be used as last resort only.

Glasgow, Scotland - Richard Pyne's health reflects a man much older than his 42 years. His world is today little more than the confines of his mother's house, which he moved to so she could take on the role of his primary carer. Until recently, the Briton lived in his own flat and held down a job, but now, he says, he struggles to walk, to sleep and to live a day-to-day life that doesn't involve some form of physical distress.

"My health and my life have been destroyed," said Pyne, speaking to Al Jazeera from his home in Norwich, in England's East Anglia.

Pyne blames his health crisis, which also includes skin and respiratory complaints, on ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic of the fluoroquinolone drug class. He was prescribed ciprofloxacin - or cipro, for short - to treat prostatitis in January 2016. Far from giving him the new start he wanted, however, the cipro, says Pyne, began to ravage his body within weeks of taking it leaving him effectively housebound.

"I can't walk properly and haven't been able to walk properly for over a year," said Pyne. "My elbows, knees, ankles, pelvic joints, just snap and pop - even my neck."

Fluoroquinolone toxicity - a disorder of the musculoskeletal system - is very real. Yet many of the world's fluoroquinolone consumers remain unaware of the grim and life-changing side effects that the likes of cipro, which the World Health Organization includes on its list of essential medicines, can wreak on the human body when used to treat nasty bacterial infections. Fluoroquinolones represent 16.6 percent of all antibiotics used globally and Pyne's story is nothing new.

"Fluoroquinolones can even take young lives and really destroy them," said Dr Beatrice Golomb, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego.

Golomb, who is conducting a research project about fluoroquinolone antibiotics, continued to Al Jazeera: "The amount of letters we have received from people - either about themselves or their spouse - who were healthy functional, vibrant, active, athletic individuals who are either now bed-bound or were in an extremely high-functioning position and now can't remember simple things or who have developed the psychiatric side-effect profile with psychosis, panic and anxiety, is absolutely devastating and absolutely tragic."

Lisa Bloomquist, 37, is another who says that she suffered from fluoroquinolone toxicity after taking cipro for a urinary tract infection in 2011. She tells Al Jazeera that two weeks after beginning her antibiotic course, "it felt like a bomb had gone off in my body".

"I went from doing cross-fit and going to the gym every single day to barely being able to walk," said Bloomquist, who lives and works in Colorado, in the western United States. "My hands and feet were swollen and painful and I had hives all over my body. My muscles were twitching and I had weakness."

Hard statistics on adverse events are difficult to come by, but in the US some 22 million Americans received a prescription for an oral fluoroquinolone in 2014 alone. Reports put the number of suspected US cipro-related adverse reactions at 79,000, including 1,700 deaths, between 2005 and 2015. Another fluoroquinolone -levofloxacin - has been linked to 80,000 adverse drug reactions, including around 1,000 deaths, over the same period.

Many health professionals, however, contend that such numbers grossly underrepresent the true scale of the problem, which, in the US, saw the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stick a black box warning to the drugs in 2008 concerning the risk of tendonitis and label fluoroquinolones as a drug of last resort, for uncomplicated infections, only last year.

"We've been amazed that many toxicities occur within seven days, some within three days and some within one day of drug initiation of fluoroquinolones," said Dr Charles Bennett, a US drugs researcher at the South Carolina College of Pharmacy, to Al Jazeera.

"So, if you put the whole thinking together and the fact that most of these people are under-reported or not reported, we're talking about an epidemic here."

In the US, cipro became known to some as the drug given to American troops during the 1990-91 Gulf War to guard against chemical weapon attacks. David Ridenhour was then a US Navy corpsman, who not only made sure his younger colleagues kept up their hygiene, but that they took their various prescribed drugs, which included ciprofloxacin.

Today, the Californian says he suffers from various health complaints from his time in the Gulf, including peripheral neuropathy, which presents as tingling and numbness in the limbs.

"One day, I came across an article which said that the FDA had put a black box warning on ciprofloxacin stating that it can cause peripheral neuropathy if taken for over a week," Ridenhour told Al Jazeera. "And bells went off in my head."

The 52-year-old is not stating that he holds cipro solely responsible for his peripheral neuropathy - he accepts that he was exposed to a number of different environmental factors and drug combinations in the Gulf which could also be to blame - but he says that he still "feels a lot of guilt" about browbeating his men into taking their cipro dosage.

"I kind of feel that since I was a corpsman and they were my marines, I was there to protect them," added the former military man, his voice breaking with emotion. "It weighs heavily on me and is a large cause of my post-traumatic stress."

Bloomquist says that she took a year and a half to recover from her debilitating complaints during which she considered herself "floxed" - a common term for those who claim to suffer from fluoroquinolone toxicity. Soon after her health returned, she began to campaign to raise awareness of fluoroquinolones, setting up her globally popular website floxiehope.com.

"Doing the advocacy work and doing the website, it took something that was by far the most traumatising and scariest thing that had ever happened to me, and I was able to turn that into something good," added the American, who recently moved to a house across Colorado, started a new job, and now considers herself fully recovered.

Few could dispute that antibiotics save lives, but the likes of Bloomquist want to see the prescription of fluoroquinolones limited to "use only in life-or-death situations when there is no viable alternative". Indeed, despite the FDA's decision to label these synthetic broad-spectrum drugs a last-resort antibiotic, reports say that their use outside of the hospital in the US is still high.

Bayer, the drug manufacturers of cipro, told Al Jazeera: "Cipro® (ciprofloxacin) and Avelox® (moxifloxacin) are both part of the important class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which for many years has been used to treat a range of infections, some of which are serious and can be life-threatening."

The company, which has been the subject of US lawsuits concerning its fluoroquinolones, added: "Bayer believes that the current approved product labelling of ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin accurately reflects the benefit-risk profile of both drugs in the approved indications. Bayer's highest priority is patient safety, and we will continue to work closely with regulatory authorities on this topic."

Back in the UK, where, according to the Yellow Card Scheme, 5066 patients have reported suspected adverse side effects from taking cipro alone between 1986 and the present day (though many campaigners contend that this is a vastly under-reported figure), Pyne has spent much of his time attempting to find answers. His constant battle with ill-health has led him to the belief that, despite many reports of people regaining full fitness, he will unlikely shake off his physical impairments anytime soon.

"At the moment, I can't see myself recovering," said a dejected Pyne, who was still trying to come to terms with his late Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder diagnosis when he took cipro. "I'm trying to accept my situation to some degree … The sad truth is that some people never completely recover - and you know what they say, 'it's the hope that kills you.'"

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/featur ... 07632.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:38 pm

Behind the appeal of America's craziest fair foods

Triple cheeseburger donut

Hailing from the Iowa State Fair, this beaut is three beef patties and six slices of American cheese wedged between a Krispy Kreme donut sliced in half.

It's not as unhealthy as it sounds, either. "Technically, that recipe is a little more than a quarter-pounder," says Geary. "So they're small, almost like a slider." Go ahead and eat two then.

Deep-fried butter

Everything is bigger in Texas and that includes high-falutin' ideas for deep-frying condiments.

Deep-fried butter debuted at the Texas State Fair before spreading to state fairs around the country. Balls of frozen butter are dipped into a sugary buttermilk batter and then fried.

"It's like an inside-outside pancake," Geary explains. "You've got the batter on the outside and it fries and the butter inside melts."

Fried Coca-Cola

Fried Coca-Cola debuted at the 2006 Texas State Fair and is now served at fairs across America.

It's an enticingly bizarre proposition, certain to pique the curiosity of hungry fairgoers. "'How do you fry something liquid?'" Geary asks. "But then when you eat it, you realize what they've done is flavored with Coca-Cola a batter, kind of like a funnel cake." Fried Coca-Cola is dusted with confectioners' sugar and served with whipped cream and a cherry on top.

Fried green beans

Not all fried foods are gluttonous calorie bombs like deep-fried Oreos or deep-fried bacon. You can fry vegetables too.

In fact, fried green beans have distinguished themselves by making their way from the fairgrounds to white tablecloth restaurants. "Now in California, they're appetizers in high-end restaurants," Geary says. Fried cheese balls and fried guacamole (also known as fried avocado bites) are two more recipes originating at fairs which upscale restaurants now serve. "You only get it once a year [at a fair] and now these restaurants have it full-time," he explains.

Deep-fried Oreos

Deep-fried Oreos are the brainchild of "Chicken Charlie" Boghosian, who created the delicacies for the Los Angeles County Fair in 2002. "He created all these crazy things," says Geary.

The LA Times notes that Chicken Charlie saw deep-fried Twinkies at a fair in Miami and improved upon the recipe, ultimately selling 10,000 of them in 2001. Inspired by his success, he debuted his deep-fried Oreos a year later. Geary recommends using Double Stuf Oreos for this decadent treat. "They melt inside and they're really good," he says.

Corn dogs

The fried corn dogs in "Fair Foods" isn't just any corn dog recipe: Geary created it for Disneyland when he was working as a pastry chef in the '80s. It's still used today at the Big Red Wagon on Disneyland's Main Street.

"People talk about it's one of their favorite cheap products at Disneyland," Geary says. "I didn't realize how popular that was until a month ago when I saw online people were doing a copycat recipe." He found the woman who was sharing the copycat Disneyland corn dog recipe online and contacted her with the original -- adapting the recipe to serve 10 instead of 150, of course.

Pickle dogs

Pickle dogs are popular at Minnesota State Fair. Despite what the name suggests, they're actually roll-ups, not hot dogs.

"There was a line down the block [at the Minnesota State Fair] for these things and I thought 'Why?'" Geary recalls. "And somebody said 'They're the healthiest thing!'" Honey ham slices coated with cream cheese and wrapped around dill pickle spears may not sound healthy, but when compared to fried butter, they're not so bad.

Coney Island chili dogs

Coney Island chili dogs aren't from Coney Island at all: Two hot dog stands (in Fort Wayne, Indiana and Jackson, Michigan respectively) both claim to have invented the dogs.

For a fair foods connoisseur like Geary, this presents a bit of a conundrum. "This was the reason why I didn't put where every food came from [in the cookbook] because those two have been fighting on who invented a Coney dog," he says.

So what's the difference between the dueling dogs?

"In Indiana, there's more onions in theirs," Geary explains. The Indiana Coney Island chili dog recipe made it into his cookbook. Sorry, Michigan.

Spicy peanut butter and jelly cheeseburgers

Spicy peanut butter and jelly cheeseburgers take the cake (yes, that was a state fair pun) for the weirdest recipe in the cookbook, says Geary. "It's kind of like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich with a hamburger thrown in the middle," he explains.

Although the addition of jelly creates an odd savory/sweet combination, this wouldn't be the first time that peanut butter has graced a burger. Geary says there was a hamburger joint in Southern California that served a burger spread with peanut butter.

This recipe takes the idea a step further with grape jelly and a sliced jalapeno pepper.

Snow cones

Fair foods come in weird and wonderful varieties, but one good old-fashioned favorite is the snow cone. This might be the easiest recipe in the cookbook, requiring only ice cubes, sugar and two packages of powdered Kool-Aid in any flavor that strikes your fancy.

Geary suggests two elegant variations that he's seen in the south of France: Snow cones made with rose petals or violet petals.
Snow cones may be considered "boring" compared to other recipes in his cookbook, he says, but they deserve a shout-out for nostalgia's sake alongside cotton candy and ice cream cones.

Frozen cheesecake on a stick

Food on a stick is popular at fairs because it doesn't require seating and it creates less waste.

"To make a cheesecake slice, you'd need a plate and a fork," Geary explains. "So what the fair people were doing was freezing [slices], dipping it in chocolate and it looks like a triangle with a stick in it." "And there's no better person than George Geary from whom to get your cheesecake recipe. Not only has he published two books about cheesecakes ("The 125 Best Cheesecake Recipes" and "The Cheesecake Bible") but in the 1990s, he made all the cheesecakes used as props on the show "The Golden Girls" (and all the ones eaten at the after-party when filming wrapped).

http://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/f ... index.html
"For the Friday night taping, I would have to do seven cheesecakes," he recalls. Perhaps an idea for his next cookbook?
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:01 am

American food is frightening. :ymsick:

I prefer to eat dozens and dozens of snails and frogs' legs than on of these… stuff :lol:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:09 pm

Piling wrote:American food is frightening. :ymsick:

I prefer to eat dozens and dozens of snails and frogs' legs than on of these… stuff :lol:


All of a sudden I do not feel very hungry :|
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