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Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed May 17, 2017 2:54 am

They might come from Iranian Kurdistan, also. Many fruits come from Iran, or from Southern Kurdistan.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jul 24, 2017 9:08 am

Quorn booms as 'flexitarians' increase :ymparty:

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Meat substitute company Quorn Foods says it has seen "unprecedented" global growth in the first half of this year, with sales up 19% worldwide.

The firm says it is benefiting from the rise of the "flexitarian" diet.

This means more people have been reducing meat consumption in favour of more sustainable protein sources.

As a result, it is investing £150m to double production at its main plant in Teesside and expects to create 300 new jobs there in the next five years.

"We are proud to be contributing to the UK's export drive and to be investing in a British innovation that is vital to addressing the future need for protein across a growing global population," said Quorn chief executive Kevin Brennan.

"Our growth will continue as expected, regardless of the Brexit deal that is reached.

"In fact, today's investment is indicative of our confidence in becoming a billion-dollar brand in the next 10 years."

The firm, which has been owned by Monde Nissin of the Philippines since 2015, says it made a pre-tax operating profit of £13.7m in the first six months of 2017.

Quorn, a meat substitute made from fungus, is sold on its own for use in recipes at home or in ready meals and products that mimic items such as burgers and sausages. It is available in 15 countries.

Quorn Foods has 650 employees on three UK sites and internationally: Stokesley in North Yorkshire, Billingham on Teesside and Methwold in Norfolk, as well as Frankfurt in Germany and Chicago in the US.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40686484
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:12 am

More than 2,500 products 'have shrunk'

As many as 2,529 products have shrunk in size over the past five years, but are being sold for the same price, official figures show.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said it was not just chocolate bars that have been subject to so-called "shrinkflation".

It said toilet rolls, coffee and fruit juice were also being sold in smaller packet sizes.

At the same time 614 products had got larger between 2012 and 2017.

The ONS said the phenomenon of shrinkflation had not had an impact on the overall inflation figures. However, in the category of sugar, jam, syrups chocolate and confectionery, the rate of inflation when adjusted for shrinking products was significantly higher.

Since 2012, the inflation rate for products such as chocolate was actually 1.22% higher, when the smaller size was taken into account.

What's getting smaller?

    Andrex toilet roll. Was: 240 sheets, now 221 - an 8% reduction

    McVities Dark Chocolate Digestives. Was 332g, now 300g - a 9.6% reduction

    Tropicana Orange and Raspberry. Was 1 litre, now 850ml - a 15% reduction
Dozens of chocolate bars and sweets have already got smaller.

    Packets of Maltesers have shrunk from 121g to 103g, a reduction of 15%. Makers Mars have said it was a way of helper consumers afford the product.

    Toblerone has shrunk by 12%, with larger spaces between the triangular "mountains". The manufacturers, Mondelez - formerly Kraft - said they changed the shape "to keep the product affordable"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40703866
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Mon Jul 24, 2017 3:07 pm

In medieval time, if a baker made lighter bread for the same price, or a wine or milk seller poured water in their jugs, they risk pillory or rope :D

I made houmous yesterday. It is so easy to cook and so delicious.

Pirouette is a true Duhoki : she LOVES tahin :lol: She is right, it is rich in calcium, so good for the 2 suckers also.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:12 pm

Toblerone manufacturers said that they had increased the space between mountains to make it easier for people to break of mountains - we all knew they lied to make money X(
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jul 25, 2017 12:43 am

How curry spice helped a dying woman beat cancer: Sufferer, 67, turned to kitchen cupboard staple turmeric after five years of failed treatment

    Dieneke Ferguson was diagnosed with the blood cancer myeloma in 2007 and underwent three rounds of chemotherapy as well as four stem cell transplants

    She tried Curcumin, a component of turmeric, and five years on, her cancer cell count is negligible, with her recovery featuring in the British Medical Journal

    Curcumin has been linked to a host of benefits, including for heart disease

After five years of living with cancer and the ravages of side-effects from repeated unsuccessful treatment, Dieneke Ferguson thought she was finally losing the battle. She had a serious relapse and there seemed little hope.

Dieneke had been diagnosed with the blood cancer myeloma in 2007 and had undergone three rounds of chemotherapy as well as four stem cell transplants.

‘I have been on all sorts of toxic drugs and the side-effects were terrifying,’ she says. ‘At one point I lost my memory for three days, and in 2008 two of the vertebrae in my spine collapsed so I couldn’t walk. They injected some kind of concrete into my spine to keep it stable.’

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Yet, despite all this, ‘nothing worked: there was just too much cancer — all my options were exhausted, and there was nothing else I could do,’ she says.

Then Dieneke started a new treatment — not another high-tech, expensive drug, but a remedy based on something many of us have in our kitchen cupboards. Where all others had failed, this one worked, and five years on, Dieneke’s cancer cell count is negligible.

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The treatment? Curcumin, which is a key component of the spice turmeric. Dieneke’s recovery was so extraordinary that it recently made the pages of the eminent British Medical Journal as a one-off case report of how a natural ingredient was somehow keeping cancer at bay.

‘When you review her chart, there’s no alternative explanation [for her recovery] other than we’re seeing a response to curcumin,’ Jamie Cavenagh, professor of blood diseases at London’s Barts Hospital and co-author of the report, said.

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Dieneke is still taking 8g of curcumin in tablet form daily — the equivalent of about two teaspoonfuls of pure powdered curcumin

Dieneke is still taking 8g of curcumin in tablet form daily — the equivalent of about two teaspoonfuls of pure powdered curcumin. As kitchen turmeric contains 2 per cent curcumin, it would be physically impossible to eat enough of the curry spice to get the same dose of curcumin.

She first came across the remedy via an internet support group and decided to try it because, as she says: ‘I had nothing to lose’.

‘I told my oncologist I was taking it and he was very interested, especially when it apparently made such a difference,’ says Dieneke, 67, who lives in North London and runs Hidden Art, a not-for-profit business helping artists market their work.

Every year about 5,500 people in the UK are diagnosed with myeloma. It occurs when the white blood cells produced in the bone marrow multiply uncontrollably and stop producing the normal antibodies needed to fight infection. The process causes bone damage, intense pain, fatigue and nerve damage.

It can be checked by drugs, but is incurable. Most people who develop it do not live beyond five years of diagnosis. Dieneke is convinced curcumin could help some of them. ‘The problem is that the medical profession can’t recommend it,’ she says.

For although it is widely used in Eastern medicine, and has been studied for its anti-inflammatory and antiseptic effects, for curcumin to be widely prescribed it must be tested in large-scale trials.

These cost millions, and the investment could never be repaid as there is no money to be made from sales of a natural compound that cannot be patented.

And yet there is good evidence ‘the biological activity’ of curcumin is ‘real’, according to Julie Ryan, a cancer specialist at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. She told the journal Nature chemically modified forms may be more effective at reaching tissues, as the raw form interacts with various proteins so works differently from many drugs.

Curcumin has been linked to a host of benefits, including for heart disease, infection, depression and dementia. A U.S. review of evidence for skin conditions, such as acne and psoriasis found ‘there is early evidence that turmeric/curcumin products and supplements, both oral and topical, may provide therapeutic benefits for skin health’.

A 2016 review, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found there is scientific evidence to support the use of turmeric extract in treating arthritis. However, the researchers called for larger, more rigorous studies to confirm this.

One of those convinced by curcumin’s potential is Angus Dalgleish, a professor of cancer at St George’s Hospital in South London, who has researched its effect on his patients. ‘Curcumin is a strong anti-inflammatory agent and chronic inflammation is the precursor of 99 per cent of all cancers,’ he says.

‘Taking regular anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin is known to reduce risk of colon cancer by around 30 per cent and have an impact on the incidence of others, too, but lack of funding for research has prevented most from benefiting from curcumin.’

However, Karen Brown, a professor of translational cancer research at the University of Leicester, has recently got funding for a small trial. She is about to publish results from a study expected to show promising results of curcumin treatment for patients with advanced bowel cancer.

‘There were only 28 people in this study, but the conclusions are strong enough to make us want to do bigger trials,’ she says.

It clearly doesn’t work for everyone, but it can work for some people, adds Professor Cavenagh.

‘A lot of my patients take curcumin at different stages of their treatment. I don’t object to it. Dieneke’s is the best response I have observed and it is clear-cut because we had stopped all other treatment. I have not seen such a convincing response before.’

Maggie Lai, senior research and clinical information specialist at the charity Myeloma UK, also helped with the BMJ report. She cautioned against raising hope for a miracle cure for cancer: ‘Curcumin seems to work for some people and not others, but we don’t know how it works and this was only a one-off case.’

One of the main problems for researchers, says Professor Brown, is finding a curcumin product that contains a standardised dose, and a formulation with an ingredient that modifies curcumin molecules to improve their absorption.

She believes an Italian curcumin product, marketed here as Turmeric+, containing soy lecithin, which studies have shown is 29 times better absorbed in the bloodstream, could resolve these difficulties. She hopes to get funding for trials using this formulation. It costs £20 for a 28-day supply.

Adam Cleevely, managing director of FutureYou, which has the distribution rights to Turmeric+, says the company is in talks with universities, including Leicester, to get more human research studies set up.

Dieneke uses a product from an Indian company called Sabinsa, made from three forms of curcumin molecules and which has been recommended by patient forums.

‘However, the tablets are expensive — £50 for ten days — but provide a form of curcumin that’s better absorbed by the body. If it was available on the NHS it would be much cheaper,’ she says.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... ancer.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Tue Jul 25, 2017 3:55 am

Good for me, because I love curcuma, and I can't imagine eating rice without it or without cari.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Tue Jul 25, 2017 7:24 am

The most famous French cheese in he world I guess :lol: even in Duhok women know how to ask some with a perfect French pronunciation

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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jul 25, 2017 8:30 am

Good to know Laughing Cow cheese is as popular there as it is here but surprised they have the French version :D

Are there many French items available in Duhok?

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Above is the soft cheese I like best :ymhug:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Tue Jul 25, 2017 12:06 pm

In fact I saw La vache qui rit and some imitations in many other countries, as Greece, Turkey, Syria…It seems very popular in Middle East.

Other French items are some shampoos, cosmetic creams, and French perfumes fakes. And also "carte d'or" ice-creams, very popular.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jul 25, 2017 6:56 pm

I am surprised you have a lot of French items there but I suppose popular items travel the world :D
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Jul 26, 2017 2:47 am

There are many other European brands like Nivea (German), Addidas (German also, I think). But most of the stuff are Turkish or Chinese.

In the other side, there are not much US items.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jul 26, 2017 2:37 pm

When Kurdistan becomes independent (HA HA HA) will they still be able to import so many goods from Turkey?
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:56 am

More and more, like Iranian products. Kurdistan is a big market for its neighbors, even if they bark.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jul 27, 2017 11:49 am

Piling wrote:More and more, like Iranian products. Kurdistan is a big market for its neighbors, even if they bark.


Everything comes down to making money :shock:
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