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Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Apr 22, 2018 11:42 am

I think that I will forget that diet :shock:

I think that I will just wait for someone to invent chocolate flavour lettuce :ymdevil:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed May 02, 2018 6:16 pm

That's Truffles Day, today.

I made some myself, it is so easy:

https://chatoulapin.blogspot.fr/2018/05 ... .html#more
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed May 02, 2018 10:06 pm

Piling wrote:That's Truffles Day, today.

I made some myself, it is so easy:

https://chatoulapin.blogspot.fr/2018/05 ... .html#more


They look delicious :D and fattening :-s
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 14, 2018 10:25 pm

College Nutritionist reveals how to make a salad more filling

A salad that actually keeps you full! Nutritionist reveals the VERY simple tweaks you can make to your healthy lunch to curb hunger pangs (and it will STILL help you lose weight)

    Dr Rachel Paul, the College Nutritionist, shows how to make a salad more filling
    She says a salad of non-starchy veg such as carrot will keep you full for 'minutes'
    But same salad with extra protein, fats and a low-cal dressing will last you hours
    She also reveals how to make snacks more filling by adding protein and fats
Salads are, in most cases, a healthy way to reach your daily fruit and vegetable goals and keep your calorie intake low.

However these light meals often don't keep you full for very long, which can cause snackers to reach for the biscuit tin.

Now a nutritionist has revealed how you can build a salad that will keep you full until dinner - and still help you lose weight.

Dr Rachel Paul, who is known as the College Nutritionist and has 169,000 followers on Instagram, has shared photos of two salads side-by-side to show what a filling and not-filling meal looks like.

Please click images to enlarge
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Rachel Paul shared an image of two salads side-by-side. The one on the left she says will only keep you full for minutes because it only contains non-starchy vegetables such as salad leaves and shredded carrot. The salad on the right however she says will keep you full for hours because it also contains protein (chicken), fats (half an avocado), and a low-cal dressing (top of right pic)

Rachel Paul has a PhD and is a registered dietician and advises college students on healthy eating

British Nutrition Foundation on the best foods for protein

The salad on the left contains only some leaves and some shredded carrot, which are both classed as non-starchy vegetables.

Dr Paul, a registered dietician who was a doctoral fellow at Colombia University, New York, until May, says this simple meal will only keep you full 'for minutes'.

However her salad on the right contains a mixture of the same non-starchy vegetables with some crucial additions.

By adding fats from half an avocado and a drizzle of low-calorie dressing, protein from a chicken breast, and extra asparagus, she says this salad will instead keep someone full for 'hours'.

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Dr Paul has also shared advice on how to make snacks last longer. By adding protein and fat in the form of two string cheeses, a snack of grapes will keep you full for two hours instead of just 45 minutes, she says

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You can make a snack such as an apple more filling by adding protein and fats, such as a string cheese bar, according to Dr Paul

In a post which has been liked by more than 9,300 people, she wrote: 'It’s no good to eat an unsatisfying lunch... only to get hungry soon after and not be able to concentrate on work or school.

'Fill your salad with good protein and fats - and use those non-starchy veggies to add a lot of VOLUME.'

She adds that while salad dressing isn't filling by itself, she drizzles it onto her salad because she likes the taste but always opts for low-calorie options.

The salad of only non-starchy vegetables won't keep dieters full for very long because it is lacking in key macronutrients, namely protein and fat, which keep you fuller for longer, she revealed.

Dr Paul, whose brand Rachel Paul Nutrition focuses on helping college students to eat more healthily and lose weight, has also shared examples of how to make snacks fill you up for longer too.

She reveals that while two bunches of grapes will only keep you full for 45 minutes, adding protein in the form of two string cheeses will help keep hunger at bay for two hours.

Similarly, eating a whole apple will only keep you full for an hour, she says, but adding protein and fat in the form of a string cheese, will keep you from feeling hungry for an extra hour.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/ ... n-fat.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Fri Jun 15, 2018 6:41 pm

Lol, what a discovery : fat is the best thing against starvation :lol:

All predator know that : when they kill a prey they don't care of muscles and steaks but eat at first guts and bone marrow, the richest and fattest body parts.

Seriously many humans should learn from wild beasts.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 20, 2018 12:30 am

Forget the 5:2 diet, it's time to try the 16:8 regime! Eating whatever you
want between 10am and 6pm boosts weight loss after just 12 weeks


    People lose 3% of their weight when they limit their eating to within eight hours

    Restricting eating windows causes people to eat 300 fewer calories a day

    Researcher says weight loss does not require people to eliminate foods

    She adds the 16:8 diet may be easier for people to follow than the popular 5:2

    More than one-third of adults in the US and 26% in the UK are obese
Following the 16:8 diet boosts weight loss after just 12 weeks, new research suggests.

Eating whatever you want for the eight hours between 10am and 6pm, and fasting for the remaining 16 hours of the day, causes people to lose around three per cent of their body weight in three months, a study found.

This is different from the popular 5:2 diet, which allows its followers to eat as normal for five days a week and consume just 25 percent of their typical calorie intake - 500 for women, 600 for men - for the remaining two days.

Although calorie counting is not part of the 16:8, reducing your eating window causes people to consume around 300 fewer calories a day, which leads to weight loss, the research adds.

Study author Professor Krista Varady, from the University of Illinois, Chicago, said: 'The take-home message from this study is that there are options for weight loss that do not include calorie counting or eliminating certain foods.

'The 16:8 diet may be easier for people to maintain'.

More than one-third of adults in the US and 26 percent in the UK are obese. Carrying too much weight puts people at risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney problems.

How the research was carried out

The researchers analysed 23 obese people with an average age of 45.

Between 10am and 6pm the participants could eat whatever they wanted, however, for the remainder of the day they could only drink water or zero-calorie beverages, such as soda, black tea or coffee.

The participants logged their daily eating times via a diary over 12 weeks.

Their weight-loss and blood-pressure results were then compared against those on a different sort of fasting diet.

'The 16:8 diet is another tool for weight loss'

Professor Varady said: 'The results we saw in this study are similar to the results we've seen in other studies on alternate day fasting, another type of diet but one of the benefits of the 16:8 diet may be that it is easier for people to maintain.

'The 16:8 diet is another tool for weight loss that we now have preliminary scientific evidence to support.

'When it comes to weight loss, people need to find what works for them because even small amounts of success can lead to improvements in health.'

Results further suggest the 16:8 diet reduces people's blood pressure but not their insulin or cholesterol levels.

The findings were published in the journal Nutrition and Health Aging.

Fasting may preserve brain health

This comes after research released last March suggested fasting may preserve brain health.

A low-fat diet that includes 40 percent fewer calories then recommended intakes reduces inflammation in mice's brain cells, a study found today.

Such eating plans also maintain the function of brain tissue, the research adds.

Lead author Dr Bart Eggen, from the University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands, said: 'Ageing-induced inflammatory activation of microglia could only be prevented when mice were fed a low-fat diet in combination with limited calorific intake.

'A low-fat diet per se was not sufficient to prevent these changes.'

Microglia is a type of cell in the brain that helps to maintain the proper function of the organ's tissue.

Results further suggest cutting calories is more effective at maintaining brain health than exercise.

Brain-cell inflammation has been linked to conditions such as multiple sclerosis and Rasmussen's encephalitis, which can cause seizures and eventual dementia.

WHAT SIZE BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER IS BEST FOR WEIGHT LOSS?

A blow out breakfast, 'average' lunch and small dinner may be the best combination for those suffering from diabetes or obesity, research suggested in March 2018.

Obese diabetes patients following such a diet lose 11lbs (5kg) over three months compared to a 3lb (1.4kg) weight gain for those eating the traditionally recommended weight-loss plan of six small meals a day, a study found.

Sticking to just three meals a day of varying sizes also reduces diabetics' glucose levels and insulin requirements, as well as their hunger and carbohydrate cravings, the research adds.

Lead author Dr Daniela Jakubowicz, from Tel Aviv University, said: 'The hour of the day — when you eat and how frequently you eat — is more important than what you eat and how many calories you eat.

'Our body metabolism changes throughout the day.

'A slice of bread consumed at breakfast leads to a lower glucose response and is less fattening than an identical slice of bread consumed in the evening.'

Results further suggest fasting glucose levels decrease by 54 mg/dl (from 161 to 107) in those eating three meals a day group compared to only 23 mg/dl (from 164 to 141) in those consuming six.

Healthy levels are considered to be less than 108 mg/dl.

Having breakfast as the main meal of the day also significantly reduces the need for insulin by -20.5 units/day (from 54.7 to 34.8) compared to those spread out throughout the day, which requires people have 2.2 more units a day (from 67.8 to 70).

Overall amounts of glucose in the blood are also lower just 14 days after adopting a three meal a day eating plan.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... -loss.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Jun 20, 2018 9:24 am

Easy to do : don't take breakfast or don't take dinner.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:30 am

I am still waiting for chocolate flavoured lettuce and instead on mini Easter Eggs, why not chocolate flavoured tomatoes :D
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:58 am

Simple diet tweaks can fight heart disease, dementia and joint pain
By Barney Calman

You really can eat yourself younger! Simple diet tweaks can fight heart disease, dementia and joint pain

    The 5:2 Way To Live Longer And Look Younger provides a plan to combat disease
    Dr Michael Mosley has drawn on the latest medical studies to devise new diet
    It will tell you everything you need to know to live longer and feel and look younger
Now this newspaper’s star health columnist, Dr Michael Mosley, has drawn on the latest medical studies to devise a new instalment in his Life Plan, exclusively for The Mail on Sunday.

The 5:2 Way To Live Longer And Look Younger provides a comprehensive lifestyle and diet plan to help fight heart disease, dementia, diabetes and even joint pain – all without the need for medication.

Good food, good health: Dr Michael Mosley has devised a diet plan to fight diseases and help people live longer

Dr Mosley’s recent bestseller, The Clever Guts Diet showed how eating fermented foods such as yogurt, sauerkraut and sourdough bread promotes friendly gut bacteria, improving digestion, aiding weight loss and boosting the immune system.

In his new plan, which will be available only in this newspaper, Dr Mosley tells you everything you need to know to live longer and feel and look younger, including how to improve skin health, beat wrinkles and even revive your sex life.

And there will be a raft of delicious new and exclusive 5:2 recipes based on his famous weight-control philosophy: eat well for five days of the week, and diet for two.

Dr Mosley said: ‘Most of us can reasonably expect to live into our 80s, but not many of us are going to get much further than that.

‘If I get into my 80s, I will be doing well, as no male member of my family has lived longer than 74 years, a record I am keen to break.

Dr Mosley says his comprehensive plan will help people live into their 80s and remain healthy (file image)

‘But what I really want to do is to stay as young and vigorous as possible for as long as possible. I think I know how to do that.’

Starting next week and then continuing in subsequent weeks in his Mail on Sunday column, Dr Mosley will be sharing lifestyle advice based on the science he has assembled over the decades.

He added: ‘The good news is that it is possible, whatever your current age, to do things that will transform your health for the rest of your life.’

Eating a 'rainbow' diet may help prevent heart disease

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... -pain.html

We will all have to buy the newspaper :))
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Jun 24, 2018 12:08 pm

Restaurants will be ordered to have compulsory calorie counts
on display at eateries across the UK

By Laura Forsyth For Mailonline

    There would be an introduction of 'clear, consistent calorie labelling' on menus
    Moves are part of a major strategy to halve childhood obesity by 2030
    Also looking at making it illegal for shops to sell energy drinks to children
Restaurants, takeaways and cafes will be made to display calorie counts, introduced under Government proposals to halve childhood obesity by 2030.

New measures will also see every primary school introduce schemes to improve children's activity including making pupils complete a 15 minute run every day, as well as regular PE lessons.

It could also see an end to sales of energy drinks to children, and the introduction of a 9pm watershed for advertising unhealthy products and similar measures online will also be considered.

New Government plans to tackle obesity will see a consultation on the introduction of 'clear, consistent calorie labelling' on menus in restaurants, cafés and takeaways

Research shows that one in five meals are eaten outside the home, with children nowadays spending at least twice as much time eating out than kids who grew up in the 1970s.

As a result, new plans will see a consultation on the introduction of 'clear, consistent calorie labelling' on menus in restaurants, cafés and takeaways.

Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt said: 'It is near-impossible to shield children from exposure to unhealthy foods.

'Parents are asking for help – we know that over three quarters of parents find offers for sugary sweets and snacks at checkouts annoying.

'It's our job to give power to parents to make healthier choices, and to make their life easier in doing so.

'The cost of obesity – both on individual lives and our NHS – is too great to ignore.

'Today we are taking steps to ensure that by 2030, children from all backgrounds have the help they need for a healthier, more active start in life.'

The Government said it will launch consultations on a range of measures by the end of the year, in a bid to halve the number of obese children within 12 years.

They include proposals to reduce 'pester power' by stopping supermarkets from displaying unhealthy foods at checkouts, aisle ends and store entrances, as well as stopping products high in fat, sugar and salt from being included in buy-one-get-one-free deals.

The Government said it will consider extending the soft drinks levy to milk-based products, if the industry does not sufficiently reduce the amount of sugar they contain.

Meanwhile every primary school will be encouraged to adopt an active mile initiative, such as the Daily Mile, which aims for every child to do at least 15 minutes' running per day.

Professor Dame Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer for England, said: 'This is a strong, robust and bold chapter two which will help children live healthier lives and support parents across the country.

'This series of measures will undoubtedly help shift the balance towards a healthier environment.'

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said: 'It's our job to give power to parents to make healthier choices, and to make their life easier'

Labour's shadow health and social care secretary Jonathan Ashworth called for 'bold action not another watered-down, lame duck strategy'.

His party has called for a four-point plan to reduce obesity by the end of the Parliament, which put the health of children before 'big business'.

He said: 'The growing childhood obesity crisis is one of the starkest public health challenges facing our country. Yet the Prime Minister has overseen a dossier of failure when it comes to the health of our children.

'It's completely unacceptable that big business has been prioritised above our children's health and wellbeing, with over two years of meaningful progress being wasted through an entirely inadequate initial strategy.'

But health campaigners reacted positively to the measures, after blasting the 'watered-down' first chapter when it was published two years ago.

Children's Food Campaign co-ordinator Barbara Crowther said: 'If the Government's child obesity plan released two years ago was a disappointing starter, then chapter two promises a wholesome and effective menu of action, but still leaving room for a healthy next course.

'We fully support the Government's intentions on junk food promotions and marketing, but the consultations to come will be crucial.

'A commitment to consider is not a commitment to act, and children's health needs decisive action.

'There are still many measures that parents and health experts tell us are needed and we believe deserve attention in future, such as restricting kids' TV, film and cartoon characters on junk food packaging, junk food sponsorship in sports and more local powers to tackle this issue.'

Caroline Cerny, of the Obesity Health Alliance, urged swift action on the Government plans, saying 'if implemented, they have real potential to ensure that children in the UK will face the healthy future they deserve'.

One in three children are overweight or obese by the age of 11, according to latest official figures.

Steve Brine, Public Health Minister, said the plan would put parents in charge and help families make healthier choices that 'provide a better chance at a longer, healthier life for our childrhttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/a ... UK.htmlen'.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... es-UK.html

An excellent plan :ymapplause:

A great many food outlets in UK already publish calorie counts on food, including McDonalds :D
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Mon Jun 25, 2018 4:35 am

It is still hard to count calories for a home-made cooking. I imagine the hell if some chefs have to count each time they add ingredients. I imagine they would mention loosely an approximate amount.

Counting calories is for people who eat industrial food, where all things are calculated by non-human cooks. That works for junk-food like MacDo and cie.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 25, 2018 10:21 am

Indian food cooked in Ghee is going to have the highest calorie content

I hate to think how many calories there are in my favourite chocolates

And I am better off not knowing what is in my ice cream - especially this weather :ymdevil:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:31 pm

The main problem is not even the calories but the sugar (hidden or not) in the food.
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 25, 2018 10:47 pm

Back to the lettuce leaves and olives :((
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jul 02, 2018 10:07 am

Diet myths you need to stop believing now
By Emilia Mazza and Laura House For Daily Mail Australia

Carbs DON'T make you fat, vegan diets do not help with weight loss and you can have cheat meals: The eight most common diet myths busted

    A glut of diet information means it can be hard to separate fact from fiction

    While some offer tips for maintaining a healthy lifestyle, others aren't as good

    Some of the most common diet myths include a ban on carbs and some fats
Choosing a diet that's balanced and nutritious is the key to a healthy life.

But with a new must-try diet or restrictive regime hitting the market on a daily basis, it is difficult to distinguish fact from fiction.

From juice-cleansing your way to a slimmer physique to cutting carbs entirely, here FEMAIL busts some of the most common diet myths doing the rounds.

FEMAIL takes a look at some of the more common diet myths currently doing the rounds including how being vegan can help you lose weight

MYTH ONE: EATING LATE AT NIGHT LEADS TO WEIGHT GAIN

Chances are you've heard that if you eat late at night, you'll be more likely to gain weight.

Conventional wisdom says this causes weight gain because your metabolism slows down when you fall asleep.

However, your body still uses energy while you sleep.

But it's worth noting if your total calorie intake for the day is greater than what you are burning, this can lead to weight gain regardless of what time it is.

Chances are you've heard if you eat late at night, you'll be more likely to gain weight (stock image)

A lot of late night eating can be related to stress or used as a way to unwind. But if you are not truly hungry, it can be easy to overindulge and sabotage healthy efforts.

Also eating close to bedtime can increase your blood sugar levels for a full 24 hours.

This means you may end up missing breakfast, and potentially end up reaching for a sugar or fat-laden snack come mid-morning.

Rule of thumb: If your diet is balanced and you exercise regularly, a small evening snack shouldn't be a problem.

MYTH TWO: A VEGAN DIET AIDS WEIGHT LOSS

Veganism is the most popular and fastest growing diet.

The diet is similar to vegetarianism in that both avoid eating meat, poultry and seafood but vegans extend this and won't eat any foods contain animal products, including dairy and eggs.
What happens if you don't eat enough?

If on a diet with too little food you may end up impacting your hormone levels negatively.

Thanks to evolution, as a survival instinct our bodies are designed to hold on to energy if food is scarce.

Your metabolism will slow down and your hormones that tell your body to burn fat will drop. Due to hormonal changes, you may also lose the ability to feel full. Keeping your hormone profile in a healthy state is a major key for weight loss.

But while a plant-based diet can have many health benefits, eliminating certain food groups can put you at risk of becoming nutrient deficient.

Nutrients vegans often lack include calcium, vitamin D, iron, vitamin B12, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids.

While one study from Loma Linda University revealed vegans had the lowest BMI (body mass index) than meat eaters or vegetarians, the diet did have some drawbacks.

Some vegan meals can be high in sweeteners or processed oils in an effort to compensate for ingredients such as butter or eggs.

Also when animal products are excluded from the diet, vegans may replace these with starchy carbohydrate-based foods.

MYTH THREE: ALL FATS ARE BAD

The three main types of fat are saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated.

Australian dietary guidelines allow for between 28 grams and 40 gram of good fats per day for men and 14 grams to 20 grams per day for women.

Australian dietary guidelines allow for between 28 grams and 40 gram of good fats per day for men and 14 grams to 20 grams per day for women

What are the dietary fats?

Saturated fat: These fats are solid at room temperature

Usually found in: meat (especially red meat, deli meats, sausages), dairy (cheese, yoghurt, butter, milk), baked goods (pastries, cakes)

Unsaturated fat: These fats are liquid at room temperature and considered a good fat source

Usually found in: olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, avocados, most nuts, most seeds

Polyunsaturated fat: Your body needs polyunsaturated fats to function, since your body doesn’t make it, you have to get it in your diet.

Usually found in: fatty fish such as sardines, tuna, salmon, trout, mackerel, and herring, ground flaxseed and flaxseed oil, unhydrogenated soyabean oil

Foods that contain good or healthy fats include olive and canola oil, nuts and seeds, avocados, eggs and fish which is rich in Omega 3 such as salmon, sardines or tuna.

It's worth remembering to use fats sparingly when cooking and always chose vegetable oils rather than hard fat.

MYTH FOUR: ALL CARBS ARE BAD

If you have been thinking about losing weight, chances are you've considered cutting carbs from your diet.

While there some research to suggest eating fewer carbs can help shed unwanted kilos, cutting this food group out from your diet can lead to an imbalance.

Carbs provide an essential source of energy and eating the right sort of carbs can help the body with feelings of fullness - which may in turn help with weight loss.

While there some research to suggest eating fewer carbs can help shed unwanted kilos, cutting this food group out from your diet can lead to an imbalance

Complex carbs include quinoa, brown rice, wholemeal pasta, legumes, dairy and starchy vegetables like sweet potato.

These are processed by the body at a slower rate and don't cause a quick energy spike.
What foods do you need in your diet?

Protein: Eating protein promotes fat loss as it's the most thermogenic macronutrient, meaning that you use the most energy to break it down in comparison to the other macronutrients

Healthy fats: Some healthy sources of healthy fats include almonds, walnuts, avocado, flaxseed oil and salmon

High fibre carbs: Fibre helps keep your gut health in control. Fibre also helps you keep fuller for longer which will help you manage your food intake. They include colourful salads, fresh fruits and berries, roasted vegetables, beans and wholegrain products

Probiotics: Making gut health a priority will greatly aid you with your fat loss goal. A probiotic with its beneficial gut bacteria will support several processes that directly impact weight loss, including enhancing your metabolism

Water: Drinking enough water will keep you boost your metabolism, keep you hydrated, helps flush out waste such as sodium to help retain water and prevent bloating and acts as an appetite suppressant

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia dietitian Lyndi Cohen said while people may be happy to live without bread or pasta for a period of time, chances are they won't want to do this for the rest of their lives.

'So even if you do lose weight, when you start eating carbs again, you will regain all the weight you've lost.'

MYTH FIVE: GLUTEN IS BAD

If you suffer from health problems related to gluten, such as a sensitivity, intolerance or coeliac disease, gluten-free foods are a must.

Gluten is a protein that can be found in wheat, rye, malt, barley, triticale and oats. It is a sticky protein that binds the dough in bread and baked goods.

While not all people who reject gluten suffer health problems, it can be they have milder forms of intolerance and by cutting this from their diet they may feel better.

However, research has found that a high-gluten diet can actually be a far healthier option and lowers the risk of heart disease.

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia dietitian Joanna said too many people cut out gluten in their diet when it is not the culprit for digestive issues.

'Many gluten-free products are highly processed and higher in fat, sugar and salt than the standard gluten-containing foods.

'Once medical conditions such as coeliac disease have been excluded, the next step is to see a specialised gut health dietitian determine which type of management is most suitable.'

According to Australian performance nutrition coach, Camilla Akerberg (pictured), diet and fitness results aren't built on living an entirely abstemious life

MYTH SIX: YOU HAVE TO EAT LEAFY GREENS AND CUT OUT ALL SUGAR AND ALCOHOL TO SEE RESULTS

According to Australian performance nutrition coach, Camilla Akerberg, diet and fitness results aren't built on living an entirely abstemious life.

'Myth busted! You do not have to eat mainly leafy greens and cut out all sugar and alcohol entirely to see results,' Camilla said.

'A balanced diet, with a variety of nutritious foods including fibrous greens and vegetables, fresh fruits and berries, lean proteins, healthy fats and good carbohydrates is the key for long-term results.

Australian personal trainer and performance nutrition coach, Camilla Akerberg, has busted the most common diet and fitness myths she's come across in her career

'Being too strict with yourself like cutting out all sugar and alcohol and eating almost solely leafy greens is not sustainable, and you will most likely end up binge eating and giving up on your diet.'

Camilla said it is important to eat enough to keep the metabolism fast and to simply eat more of the good and less of the bad.

'A small salad a day and an overdose of cardio seems to be a common perception of what you need to do to see weight loss results. Getting leaner, or maintaining a toned physique is NOT about not eating,' she said.

'Myth busted! You do not have to eat mainly leafy greens and cut out all sugar and alcohol entirely to see results,' Camilla said

'It's about eating the right nutrition in the right amounts that suits your body and your goal. Food is not the enemy, but the key to a healthy body, a fast metabolism and the ability to get results.

'Try and fill your plate with non-processed foods as much as possible, so that there is less room for processed foods and added sugar in your diet. Processed foods, junk foods and added sugar in your diet can result in high blood sugars spikes which in surplus can lead to conversion into excess body fat.

'Cutting out alcohol completely out of your diet is for most of us not maintainable either. But remember to only drink occasionally and in moderation. Alcohol stimulates your hunger and inhibits your body to break down and digest nutrients in your foods effectively.'

Camilla said it is important to eat enough to keep the metabolism fast and to simply eat more of the good and less of the bad

MYTH SEVEN: CALORIE COUNTING IS THE BEST WAY TO SEE RESULTS FAST

'We all know that concept of energy (calories) in and out of our bodies does matter. If you consume more energy than what you use, the excess energy will be stored as body fat,' Camilla said.

'If you use more energy than what you consume, you will lose weight. But counting calories everyday really IS NOT a maintainable way to live.'

Camilla said people simply 'get sick of counting calories' and advises them to adopt a more sustainable approach.
Camilla Akerberg shows her glute and core activation circuit

'If you use more energy than what you consume, you will lose weight. But counting calories everyday really IS NOT a maintainable way to live,' Camilla said

'When you put the focus on counting calories you can often forget the nutritional value of foods. Instead on fixating on the numbers, put an effort in to choosing healthy options,' she said.

'Fill your diet with greens, vegetables, fruits and berries, lean proteins, good fibrous carbohydrates and healthy fats. Limit processed foods, junk foods, added sugars and too much alcohol. You will be surprised how changes as such in your diet will make a big difference to your well being and results.'

So what is the best way to see results with a diet?

'Understanding your own body, listening to it and eating foods that you feel good inside out eating is key,' she said.

'Trial and error can sometimes be the best approach. The best diet is one you can keep - achieving results is all about consistency!

'It's typically the diet that is filled with foods you enjoy that you will follow, as well as are healthy for you so that you can get results. Counting calories is a good way to get an understanding of your energy input, but counting them from day to day is not a sustainable approach to getting results!'

Camilla has a four week nutrition transformation program to help people learn more about their bodies

MYTH EIGHT: YOU HAVE TO CUT FOOD GROUPS ENTIRELY AND YOU CAN'T HAVE CHEAT MEALS

'I don't recommend cutting out any food groups completely. It's about balance and eating things in moderation,' Caimlla said.

'Eat as much fresh food as possible and limit empty calories that are low in nutrients.'

Cheat meals are also okay.

'I love Thai food so this is a cheat meal go-to option for me,' Camilla said.

'I am such a sweet-tooth however and love lollies (red liquorice and salty liquorice are some of my favourites) and chocolate.

'Cheat meals are not your enemy if you plan them right and keep consistent with your healthy choices.'

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