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Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:25 pm

Why skinny people die of 'fat' diseases
fat people can be healthier than you think


It's all down to the body's inner-workings and a revolutionary blood test can determine YOUR risk

    For nearly 200 years, BMI has been used as a measure of obesity and health risk

    But what’s going on inside your body may be more crucial than your weight

    Now doctors appear to have discovered a breakthrough in our understanding
Chubby, but fit, might sound like the kind of excuse overweight people use to keep at the crisps. In fact, there is evidence that — contrary to the mainstream thinking — some overweight people lead long and healthy lives, while some slim, apparently healthy people die prematurely of ‘fat diseases’ such as diabetes and heart disease.

Now doctors appear to have discovered what’s going on, heralding a breakthrough in our understanding of weight and disease: in future, it may not be your weight that matters so much as what’s going on inside your body.

And finding out could involve nothing more than a blood test. What it will mean is that instead of doctors saying being over a certain size means you’re automatically ‘at risk’, they would use the results of this blood test to work out your personal risk.

This could even help identify foods that are problems for you, because of how they affect you in particular.

As one leading expert told us, this ‘is the next big thing in medicine’.

Konstantinos Manolopoulos, a clinician scientist in endocrinology and metabolism at the University of Birmingham, explains: ‘It’s a major step towards personalised medicine — where the aim is to provide customised treatment options for patients.’

For nearly 200 years, BMI (body mass index) has been used as a measure of obesity and health risk. It’s calculated by dividing your weight by your height, and dividing the answer by your height again. A score of 25 or more means you’re categorised as ‘overweight’ and your risk of developing conditions such as diabetes and heart disease is raised significantly.

But, increasingly, there have been questions raised about the reliability of BMI as a predictor of health because it doesn’t show the full picture. For example, someone can be at risk of disease, and yet be slim and have a normal BMI — or have no health problems, despite being classed as overweight according to their BMI.

Now U.S. researchers say they have developed a replacement, an advanced blood test that may provide a more accurate method of identifying our risk of diseases.

The test hones in on and measures all of the compounds in our blood — collectively known as the metabolome. In an analysis of these compounds, scientists were able to identify people at a higher risk of diabetes and heart disease early.

FUTURE BENEFITS

They say this principle could one day be applied to other diseases, such as high blood pressure, autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer — where doctors would look for molecular ‘signatures’ in the blood that would indicate someone’s risk before they develop them — and decide on the best action.

‘By looking at metabolome changes, we could identify individuals with a several-fold increase in their risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease over the ensuing years,’ said Amalio Telenti, a professor of genomics at Scripps Research Institute in California, who led the new study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

It could even be used to check how well a person would respond to certain medication.

‘The hope is that the metabolome result is better than others — including BMI — and it has potential to be the best test we have to assess disease risk,’ Elizabeth Cirulli, a research scientist in the study, told Good Health.

THE BMI CAN BE MISLEADING

While it can be useful to give a general indication of health, BMI has been criticised for a number of weaknesses, says Dr Manolopoulos. ‘For example, it doesn’t measure fat distribution, or take into account age, sex, or muscle mass that all contribute to our health and risk of diseases.’

For instance, super-fit rugby players might have an ‘obese’ BMI because their bodies are packed with muscle. A 2016 study in the International Journal of Obesity found that half of participants categorised as ‘overweight’ according to their BMI were in good heart health and had normal cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar readings.

Meanwhile a third whose BMI was ‘normal’ had unhealthy results in these tests, which assess heart and metabolic health.

‘BMI has been overplayed and it does not measure the actual amount of body fat or what it is doing in the body,’ says Fredrik Karpe, a professor of metabolic medicine at the University of Oxford. ‘There is a need for better tools that would allow us to stratify patients more accurately.’

OBESE BUT HEALTHY

The new approach is based on a study of the health records of around 2,000 people that had been monitored for an average of 13 years.

The U.S. scientists looked at their BMIs and genes, and the levels of around 1,000 compounds in the blood — such as fatty acids, sugars, hormones and vitamins — and how these changed over time.

These compounds (which make up the metabolome), are known to change due to age and lifestyle — and weight gain.

What they found, though, was that there was a pattern which could predict each person’s risk of developing obesity-related diseases later on. People who had a specific pattern in their metabolome — which the scientists called the obesity ‘signature’ — at the start of the study were significantly more likely to be obese or end up with diabetes or heart disease by the end of the follow-up period.

They were also more likely to have accumulated fatty tissue in the liver or around internal organs — known as visceral fat — which releases toxic chemicals.

Surprisingly — and this is significant — these problems occurred later in life regardless of the person’s body weight. Some people who were slim but had the abnormal metabolome pattern at the start of the study also developed diabetes or heart disease. Meanwhile, some obese people in the study had a normal metabolome and didn’t develop these conditions.

The abnormal metabolome could explain why some slim people develop certain conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and why some obese people live long, healthy lives without illnesses, the researchers concluded.

The study supports the existence of the so-called ‘healthy obese’, where some people who are obese can live free from diseases you might expect them to develop.

This is a matter of great debate in the scientific community. ‘The cause of weight gain is complex, but is predominantly due to excessive calorie intake and insufficient activity levels — this is the only way we can explain the three-fold rise in obesity levels over the past few generations,’ says Dr Ian Campbell, a GP in Nottingham who specialises in obesity.

‘But some people are clearly at greater risk of cardiovascular complications at a much lower weight; conversely some super heavy people seem to avoid complications, too. The science described here is in its infancy. But this study shows that there are complex biological reasons why some people develop ill health.’

A SLIM FIGURE...BUT STILL AT RISK

So why would a slim person have this ‘fat’ metabolome? And why, if they have it, aren’t they visibly fat? The simple answer is that the scientists don’t know yet, Professor Telenti told Good Health, but there are some theories.

One is that their genes change how they deposit fat around their body. ‘Different genes determine how much fat you lay down and where,’ explains Kevin Murphy, a professor of endocrinology and metabolism at Imperial College London.

‘You could be slim, have a low BMI and not much fat but have genes that put it in the wrong place — around your liver and heart, for example — and that puts you at risk.’

As Professor Telenti puts it: ‘It shows us that dangerous obesity and our risk of complications is a metabolomic issue, not necessarily a visual one.’

REVOLUTIONARY APPROACH

In fact, those who study the metabolome say it could be the next major player in developing personalised medicine, just as important as the influence of our genes and the role of the microbiome — the community of bacteria that live in and on us.

‘Arguably the metabolome is more important because it is influenced by genes and lifestyle — it is also easier to measure and interpret than the microbiome,’ says Dr Cirulli.

Warwick Dunn, a professor of analytical and clinical metabolomics at the University of Birmingham, agrees.

‘We have around 10,000 compounds in our metabolome — such as glucose (sugar), cholesterol, and all sorts of chemicals involved in the breakdown of fats and proteins — and levels are dynamic,’ he says. ‘The fact that it is so dynamic and influenced by so many processes in our body means the levels can give us a much more accurate idea of our risk than BMI ever could.

‘More studies are showing us that the metabolome in our blood are a good indicator before diseases ever develop — and this will help doctors intervene to choose the best possible medication or lifestyle changes that could reduce the risk of that particular condition.’

In the new study, the researchers pinpointed a ‘signature’ made up of 49 compounds that had a strong association to the risk of obesity-related diseases.

For example, the unhealthy signature had higher levels of uric acid, a waste chemical produced when the body breaks down purines, substances found in foods including red meat. The obesity ‘signature’ was also higher in bad fats — as expected. Interestingly, says Dr Cirulli, ‘levels of a compound called cinnamoylglycine were lower — this is known to be released by good bacteria in the gut and is key to a healthy microbiome’.

She says this compound is part of the mechanism behind so-called ‘healthy obesity’.

‘If we had just used BMI to assess people’s risk of diseases, many would have been told they were fine and sent home,’ says Dr Manolopoulos. ‘Based on the metabolome and if they had this obese “signature”, we would now tell more people — even those who are slim — that they’re at risk and need monitoring or to change their lifestyle in some way.’ For example, if someone was found to have high uric acid levels they may be told to stay away from red meat and reduce their fizzy drink consumption.

The beauty of the test is that if it’s thought red meat, for example, is a problem, ‘we can tell them to eat less, and very quickly get a readout of whether that intervention helps using the test again’, says Professor Telenti.

PILLS NOT WORKING?

The new test could also be used to see if patients will respond to certain medicines too.

‘For example if we want to prescribe metformin for diabetes we could give a patient one tablet to try and then take a blood sample to analyse the metabolome,’ says Professor Telenti. ‘As a result we can get an immediate result of what the drug is doing in the body and decide if it’s suitable for them to take it long-term or they are better suited to another treatment — this is at the heart of personalised medicine.’

EASY ALERTS

As Professor Murphy explains: ‘BMI is a crude measurement. With this new test, we may soon be able to screen people using their metabolome data and see if they are healthier — or indeed less healthy — than their BMI would suggest.’

Professor Karpe adds: ‘We already measure some of the compounds used in the test — for example, we measure glucose, uric acid and fats in obesity and diabetes. This new blood test pulls this all together to provide one ultimate blood test where we would theoretically take a sample and identify a “signature” that would highlight our risk of various diseases — in this case they identified a signature for different types of obesity.

‘It will be expensive though — around £500 per person.’

However, Professor Telenti argues that because the technology already exists — i.e. doctors already do blood tests — it won’t be too expensive.

‘The technology already exists in many hospitals — it’s about getting better at reading exact molecular content and identifying what compounds are of interest for each disease,’ says Professor Telenti. ‘The price and technology won’t be the killer factor — paying less for something that is less informative is a false economy.’

LET THEM EAT CAKE?

The study didn’t go far enough to explain what causes the different metabolic signatures, but it seems differences in lifestyle such as diet, stress and exercise seem to play a critical role — more so than genes thought to predispose people to obesity or the associated diseases.

‘The take-home message is that in order to stay healthy, you should be focused on these habits and not on your weight,’ says Dr Cerulli.

‘You can be obese and have a healthy metabolic signature, and you can be slim and have an unhealthy metabolic signature. Even if you carry genes that put you at risk of weight gain and disease — your lifestyle is what ultimately affects that risk.’

Professor Telenti agrees: ‘Some people have a genetic predisposition to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases but a metabolome level tells us that this risk is reversible.’

Link to Full Article:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/arti ... think.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:42 am

I had blood test last month. Sugar, fat, etc. everything was ok. Some diets are just for aesthetic :smile:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:11 pm

Piling wrote:I had blood test last month. Sugar, fat, etc. everything was ok. Some diets are just for aesthetic :smile:


BRILLIANT :ymparty:

Excellent news especially as your diet is working and you are gradually losing weight :ymapplause:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Oct 25, 2018 1:16 am

FDA approves first new flu drug in 20 years: Wonder
medication 'can cure symptoms in as little as two days'


    Xofluza is a single dose pill for patients aged 12 or older who have had symptoms for no more than 48 hours

    Studies showed Xofluza cut the amount of time people were sick from 3.3 days to 2.5 days and reduced the length of a fever from 42 hours to one day

    80,000 Americans died of the flu and its complications last year, the highest death toll in at least four decades

    Xofluza will be available in just a few weeks and cost $150 without insurance and $30 with insurance and a company coupon

    The FDA says the drug is not a substitute for people getting the flu vaccine
US health regulators have approved the first new type of flu drug in 20 years.

Xofluza is a one-dose pill for patients aged 12 and older ahead of the brunt of the winter flu season that can reduce severity and shorten the duration of flu symptoms

However, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said patients must be experiencing symptoms for no more than 48 hours.

Studies showed it cut the amount of time people were sick from 3.3 days to 2.5 days and reduced the length of a fever from 42 hours to one day.

Additionally, it reduced viral shedding - the process by which a virus spreads from one person to another - from four days to one day.

The FDA says that despite the new drug's approval, it is not a substitute for the vaccine and that getting a shot is the best chance of protection against the virus.

Each year, the flu typically kills about 12,000 to 56,000 Americans and up to 650,000 people worldwide.

Health officials have said an estimated 80,000 Americans died of the flu and its complications last winter, the disease's highest death toll in at least four decades.

Across the US, 179 children died and thousands were hospitalized. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said 80 percent of the children who died were not vaccinated.

The severe flu season increased demand for Tamiflu, a treatment from the same company that developed Xofluza, and led to shortages in individual offices.

'With thousands of people getting the flu every year, and many people becoming seriously ill, having safe and effective treatment alternatives is critical,' said FDA Commissioner Dr Scott Gottlieb in a statement.

'This novel drug provides an important, additional treatment option.'

According to a statement from the FDA, Xofluza's safety and efficacy were tested in two clinical trials involving a total of 1,832 patients.

In both trials, patients received either Xofluza, a placebo, or Tamiflu, which is taken twice daily for five days.

Researchers found that Xofluza alleviated symptoms in a shorter of amount time compared the placebo.

However, people taking Xofluza had symptoms that either ended or were greatly reduced symptoms in just two days on average, similar to Tamiflu.

While Xofluza didn't work faster than Tamiflu, it did reduce the level of the virus in patients' nose and throat quicker.

The FDA statement said that Xofluza side effects were mild - diarrhea, nausea, headaches and bronchitis - and occurred at about the same rate as study participants given Tamiflu or placebo pills.

Further testing is planned to determine whether Xofluza is better than Tamiflu for preventing spread of the flu to others and for treating patients at high risk for hospitalization and pneumonia, such as people with diabetes or lung disease, pregnant women, young children, and the elderly.

Andrew Villani, senior manager of corporate relations at Genentech, the US-based distributor of the new drug, told CNN that customers who buy the drug without insurance will pay about $150, the same price a Tamiflu.

But he added that patients with commercial insurance that will cover the cost and who use a company coupon could pay as little as $30.

However, the best thing is to not need the drug at all and protect yourself ahead of the brunt of the flu season.

Health officials are encouraging the public to make sure they receive their flu shots, preferably by the end of October.

The CDC recommends getting the vaccine either in the form of a shot or a nasal spray. For those who choose to go with the injectable, there are two options.

The first is a trivalent vaccine, which protects against two influenza A strains, H1N1 and H3N2, and one influenza B strain.

The second option, the quadrivalent flu vaccine, protects against the same strains as the trivalent vaccine, as well as an extra influenza B virus

For the first time in two years, the CDC updated its recommendations to include the nasal spray, known as FluMist.

The nasal spray uses live, weakened viruses which are meant to teach the body to recognize and ward off flu strains if you become infected.

The shot works similarly but uses dead strains of the virus.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/arti ... cades.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:42 am

Can't shake a cold? Try these! From supplements to exercises to diet changes: 10 techniques proven by science to stave of sniffles and coughs

    Most of us (70%) get respiratory infections every year, and go to the doctor for help

    However, unlike with a headache or muscle pain, there is little you can do to speed it up

    These 10 tips may help you, though: from hand washing to exercising
Some 70 percent of us will get a respiratory infection each year.

It's the most common reason anyone goes to a doctor.

That means trying to prevent yourself catching that horrendous lurgy is a tall order.

And every time it comes around, it's always the same: you scramble for anything to end the tedious and uncomfortable sickness.

Unlike a pulled muscle or a headache, there aren't any quick fixes: popping a pill won't do much for you.

However, there are some natural methods you can try.

Here, we explain ways to boost your immunity and help prevent coughs, colds and flu that have a solid scientific basis.

1. Eat a rainbow-colored diet

Eating a diet rich in lots of different fruits and vegetables will ensure you're getting plenty of antioxidants into your diet.

The key immune-boosting ones are vitamins A, C, D, zinc, selenium and bioflavonoids and they're found in brightly coloured and green vegetables.

Vitamins A, C, D, as well as zinc and selenium help to make our white blood cells more effective at fighting off invaders like bacteria and viruses and in doing so, contribute to the normal functioning of the immune system, asserts nutritional therapist Ellie Isom.

A bright and colourful diet is often recommended to help support and boost the immune system

'Vitamins A and C can be found in a wide range of fruit and vegetables, whereas vitamin D, because it is fat soluble is found in food such as oily fish, dairy and eggs [see #4]. Zinc can also be sourced from these foods, as well as beans, pulses, nuts and seeds [see #10].

Indeed, a review of 83 clinical studies published in July this year in the American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition looked closely at the body of evidence on the subject and concluded that 'high intakes of fruits and vegetables lead to both a reduction in pro-inflammatory biomarkers [which can promote illness] and an enhanced immune cell profile.'

'A bright and colourful diet is often recommended to help support and boost the immune system,' says Isom.

'The colours within these foods are beneficial components, as well as their vitamin and mineral content,' she explains.

Especially helpful for immunity are plant pigments such as flavonoids found in rosehip, bilberry and other berries, carotenoids found in foods such as carrots and sweet potatoes, as well as rutin and hesperidin that are naturally found in citrus fruit, and lycopene naturally found in tomatoes, strawberries and cherries.

'These nutrients are antioxidant molecules that can prevent damage to cells and tissues, and reduce inflammation,' says Isom.

2. Get enough sleep

You have probably heard about the importance of getting enough sleep a million times before, but have you ever linked your insomnia problem to those recurring sore throats?

In a fascinating study published last year in the journal Sleep researchers took blood samples from 11 pairs of identical twins with different sleep patterns and discovered that the twin with shorter sleep duration had a depressed immune system, compared with his or her sibling.

'Sleep is our body's golden opportunity to rest and repair, and poor sleep is a common driver of a weakened immune system,' says Isom.

'Establishing a regular sleep-wake cycle – for example, 10pm sleep, 7am wake, avoiding technology in the hour or so before bed, and making sure you sleep in a dark room with blackout blinds and eye mask if needs be, alongside increasing your intake of calming nutrients such as magnesium and theanine, can be a great starting point,' she asserts.

The best sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans and pulses to name a few. 'However, for therapeutic levels we would recommend supplementation'.

'The best source of theanine is green tea,' says Isom. 'However, this may be stimulating for some individuals to consume before bed due to the caffeine levels in which case to help improve sleep, we would again recommend supplementation'.

3. Exercise

It works for just about everything, but research has often been divided as to whether exercise can improve your immune system.

Some experts believe exercise can help release potential pathogens by keeping the lymphatic system moving, which encourages the body's detoxification through the lungs and skin through increased breath capacity and sweat. Any gym junkie will tell you they get fewer colds or just 'sweat them out.'

But while for years it was believed that strenuous exercise (the intensity and amounts elite athletes do) could dampen your immune system, a study from the University of Bath published in April this year in the journal Frontiers in Immunology challenged this idea.

The authors analysed the research available and reinterpreted it, concluding that intense exercise – instead of dampening immunity – may instead be beneficial for immune health.

Intense exercise – instead of dampening immunity – may instead be beneficial for immune health, a recent study found

The authors suggested that low numbers of immune cells in the bloodstream in the hours after exercise are – far from being a sign of immune-suppression – in fact a signal that these cells, primed by exercise, are working in other parts of the body, which has an immuno-protective effect.

According to Harvard Medical School, 'For now, even though a direct beneficial link hasn't been established, it's reasonable to consider moderate regular exercise to be a beneficial arrow in the quiver of healthy living, a potentially important means for keeping your immune system healthy along with the rest of your body'.

4. Take Vitamin D

Last year, a major global study published in the British Medical Journal suggested that adding more vitamin D to your diet could significantly cut NHS costs, by reducing the risk of colds, flu and other dangerous respiratory infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis.

The study, undertaken by Queen Mary University of London, reanalysed data from 25 clinical trials involving around 11,000 people from 14 countries.

The authors suggested their work settles the question of whether an increase in colds and flu in the winter is partly due to a vitamin D deficiency in the winter.

The consumption of vitamin D supplements daily or weekly showed an immunity benefit in everybody involved in the research, but particularly for those who have low levels, don't get outside much, cover themselves against the sun or for religious reasons, or have dark skins which absorb less sunlight.

As our sun exposure becomes very limited during winter, it is essential to supplement vitamin D to prevent deficiencies and boost immunity

So what's going on?

'Immune cell function is highly dependent on vitamin D metabolism,' says Ellie Isom. 'Deficiency in vitamin D is associated with increased susceptibility to infection'.

'Vitamin D enhances the immune system's ability to recognise pathogens and initiate a response against them, especially influenza (which causes the flu), and respiratory tract infections,' says Isom.

'As our sun exposure becomes very limited during winter, it is essential to supplement vitamin D to prevent deficiencies and boost immunity.'

Despite its importance, vitamin D deficiency is unfortunately very common, particularly within the UK, and statistics show that up to 25 per cent of the general UK population may be deficient in vitamin D.

'This is mainly due to our lack of sunlight exposure along with a low intake through the diet, especially for those who follow a vegetarian or vegan diet,' says Isom.

Other factors which further contribute towards low vitamin D levels include old age, pregnancy and breastfeeding, dark or covered skin, sunscreen use, obesity and the intake of certain medications.

Vitamin D can also play a role in bone health and mental health, as well as the above mentioned immune health, so deficiency symptoms can be broad and range from increased susceptibility to infections, slow wound healing, low mood and tiredness as well as achy joints/bone pain.

'If you're supplementing, the dose would be dependent on what your levels are like to begin with,' says Isom.

Vitamin D levels can be determined by a blood test from your GP or can be done via private testing, as well as finger print testing which can be ordered online from reputable companies such as BetterYou.

Government recommendations for vitamin D are 10 micrograms (600iu) per day to avoid deficiency, however higher levels can be supplemented, especially during the winter months and in those with a higher risk of deficiency.

'The research suggests that vitamin D in the form of D3 is the more affective from of this nutrient,' says Isom.

'Additionally, supplementing with an emulsified vitamin D supplement, as it is a fat soluble nutrient, can further help to maximise absorption, especially for those with digestive issues,' she suggests. Try BioCare's Nutrisorb Liquid BioMulsion D which provides 1000iu of vitamin D a serving.

5. Take Vitamin C

Vitamin C has been hailed a cold and flu preventative for decades, but what does the science say?

Last year, a report published in the journal Nutrients concluded that, 'Vitamin C appears to be able to both prevent and treat respiratory and systemic infections by enhancing various immune cell functions…at levels of 100-200mg a day.'

But in 2013, a Cochrane Review wasn't as straightforward. Cochrane Reviews are released by a global network of scientists, medics and other professionals in 130 countries that look at the body of research on a given topic.

Their 2013 review looked at placebo controlled trials on vitamin C and the common cold on over 11,000 trial participants.

Vitamin C appears to be able to both prevent and treat respiratory and systemic infections by enhancing various immune cell functions

They concluded that routine supplementation for prevention of colds didn't have enough evidence behind it.

On the other hand, if you're under a lot of stress and especially if you exercise a lot, the findings suggested supplementation with vitamin C could halve the risk of colds.

Moreover, when it comes to shortening the duration of colds and flus, the report asserted that supplementing with high dose vitamin C as soon as your symptoms started to show – in the region of taking around 8000mg a day – could reduce the severity of your cold and make it go away faster.

'Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant that can improve the functioning of immune cells, helping with both prevention and fighting off infections,' says Isom. 'Supplementation can decrease the duration of cold by 1-1.5 days'.

The best form of vitamin C to supplement with is magnesium ascorbate. Isom suggests. This is vitamin C buffered with magnesium, which makes it less acidic.

'Dosage-wise, research suggests that doses of around 1000mg can be beneficial for supporting the immune system. However this can be increased during periods of ill health [see above].'

6. Put garlic in everything

Garlic is a natural anti-microbial (antibacterial and antifungal) and anti-inflammatory compound

Garlic is a natural anti-microbial (antibacterial and antifungal) and anti-inflammatory compound, says Isom.

'Various garlic preparations have been shown to exhibit antibacterial activity against parasitic bacteria such as Escherichia, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Clostridium to name a few,' she says. But they're all gut bugs. 'It means garlic can help to support the immune system by supporting the microbial balance of the gut'.

In fact, majority of the research on garlic and the immune system relates to its antibacterial properties, Isom points out.

'There is very limited research that exists on the use of garlic as an antiviral,' Isom asserts. 'Therefore, the use of garlic for the direct prevention of a common cold, which is viral, is questionable.

'However, some studies are indicating that garlic can increase the activity of natural killer cells, which are immune cells that are involved in containing and controlling viral infections. So, consuming garlic could be beneficial, but perhaps not the first point of call for cold prevention due to the lack of research'.

7. Get to know probiotics

Your gut is now referred to by experts as the body's 'second immune system.'

That's because the gut immune system contains 70–80 per cent of the body's immune cells and can be the main gateway for infections, Isom explains.

'An imbalance in our gut microflora has been linked to an increased presence of infections, as well as autoimmune conditions,' she says.

'Supporting gut health with live bacteria, or probiotics can be really beneficial for supporting the immune system'.

Our modern highly processed diets and stressed out lifestyles can negatively impact our gut bacteria, especially over the winter period and with Christmas indulgences

In another Cochrane Systematic Review published in 2011, authors looked at 14 randomised clinical trials and concluded that using probiotics were better than placebo at helping reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections and reduced the need for antibiotics.

Our modern highly processed diets and stressed out lifestyles can negatively impact our gut bacteria, especially over the winter period and with Christmas indulgences, like alcohol and mince pies.

So supporting our gut microbiome is especially important at this time of the year, Isom asserts.

'This can be done via supplementation, or the consumption of fermented foods such as kefir, sauerkraut, kimchee and kombucha'.

8. Load up on beta-glucans in mushrooms and oats

Beta glucans are a type of carbohydrate present in the cell walls of certain fungi such as mushrooms as well as in the cell walls of foods such as whole oats.

'These are capable of stimulating our immune system and can help to reduce the occurrence, symptoms, and duration of upper respiratory tract infections and colds, so increasing our intake of them through food and supplements can be helpful at this time of the year,' advises Isom.

People who consumed beta glucans in a recent study were 25 percent less likely to have symptomatic cold and flu infections

In fact, in a 2013 double blind, placebo-controlled clinical study published in the Journal of European Nutrition found that supplementation with beta glucans (those in the study were given Brewer's Yeast which is a source of this) reduced the number of symptomatic cold and flu infections in subjects by 25 per cent.

Other rich sources of beta glucans include barley, wheat, rye and seaweed.

9. Wash your hands all the time!

According to the Global Handwashing Partnership, handwashing can help prevent up to 21 per cent of colds and upper respiratory tract infections – quite good going for something that's totally free.

Here's how it works. Germs live on all of our hands, whether we like it or not. According to the Centre For Disease Control in the US, 'people touch their face, nose, mouth and eyes without even realizing it and germs get into the body through the these areas and make us sick.

If you don't wash your hands when you get off that infected train and inevitably touch your eyes, nose or mouth, presto, then you're infected

Say you're on a packed Tube and one person sneezes and that person has a cold. Those germ particles end up literally all over that tube so the next thing you touch, for example the newspaper you grab from behind the offending sneezer, could well be infected with those germs.

If you don't wash your hands when you get off that infected Tube and inevitably touch your eyes, nose or mouth, presto, then you're infected.

This is also why the person sneezes a should be trapping their sneezes – along with the coughs and yawns – in a tissue they then dispose of.

It goes without saying, but we'll say it anyway – use three pumps of soap and wash with warm water, creating good lather! Check out the NHS video here.

10. Take zinc

Zinc is well known as a cold remedy and in 2014, a report published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal looking at the evidence for common cold remedies concluded that taking 10-15mg of zinc sulfate was likely to be beneficial at preventing the common cold, especially in kids.

In one of the studies in the report, the proportion of children with no colds during the study period was 33 per cent in the zinc group versus 14 per cent in the control group.

Zinc supplements are best taken an hour before a meal, or 2-3 hours after a meal

According to the NHS the daily recommended amount of zinc for women is 7mg, and 9.5mg for men (ages 19-64). For kids, it's a bit different. 1-3 year olds should consume 5mg, 4-6 years olds should have 6.5mg, 7-10 year olds should have 7mg and 11-14 years olds should have 9mg.

Zinc supplements are best taken an hour before a meal, or 2-3 hours after a meal.

'Although the evidence for cold prevention with zinc comes from studies involving only children, there is no biological reason why zinc would work only in children and not adults,' the authors concluded.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/arti ... iques.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Fri Nov 09, 2018 5:33 am

Studys Say If You Drink Your Coffee Black, You’re Probably A Psychopath

Coffee is the absolute nectar of the Gods. It can officially save you when you haven’t had quite enough sleep and need to complete an entire day of work, or if you’re anything like me it can turn you from an absolute morning troll into a delight.


While obviously too much caffeine is bad for you, coffee generally hasn’t ever been linked to being bad – until a recent study brought to light something pretty interesting. Apparently, if you like your coffee black – then you’re most likely to be a psychopath. Hmm.

Brought to light by a study undertaken by the University of Innsbruck in Austria, it focused on a control group of 953 American adults, who’s average age was about 35.

The results, which were published in the journal Appetite, revealed that the participants who reported enjoying foods with a bitter taste were more likely to report “malevolent personality traits” – even when sweet, sour and salty tastes were involved.

The participants had to report which foods they liked best and answer a number of personality questionnaires that measured different qualities, including narcissism, aggression, psychopathy, and “everyday sadism.” The surveys also tried to measure what their attitude was to ‘inflicting pain on others’.

According to the studies, the preference of bitter-tasting foods, such as black coffee, dark chocolate, radishes, beer, tonic water, and celery showed the ‘biggest indicator of having psychopathic traits’, while those who scored ‘high on agreeableness’ apparently reported a special preference for foods that were a bit sweeter, like candy and cake, and they had absolute ZERO time for the same bitter foods that were ‘loved by psychopaths’.

So next time you’re going out on a date and the person opposite you decides to make their ‘end of meal coffee’ black, if you believe anything from this study then you should probably immediately block and delete them from your phone and never speak to them again. OR you could try and imagine that not everyone who likes coffee and beer is a psychopath, and you should be just fine.

https://www.joyscribe.com/studys-say-if ... sychopath/


I should be a Hannibal Lecter female :lol:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:51 am

New study reveals the ways to live TEN YEARS longer

Don't retire - and have plenty of sex! New study reveals the scientifically proven ways to live TEN YEARS longer

    Five more healthy years of life is the government's new goal to prevent illness

    Our emotional state and how much sex we have plays a role in a longer life span

    One study says that ageing is 10 per cent genetics and 90 per cent lifestyle
Five more healthy years of life. That’s the Government’s goal for all of us under a new plan that seeks to prevent rather than simply treat illness. ‘It’s about people choosing to look after themselves better,’ said Health Secretary Matt Hancock last week.

But what should we be doing?

A Harvard University study in August identified five key habits that could potentially add a decade to life expectancy, including eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly and drinking only moderately.

But they are not the only things we can do – our emotional state and how much sex we have all play a role in assuring a longer, healthier life. Here we examine the lifestyle tweaks scientifically proved to add years to your life…

Don't act your age

The secret of longevity owes more to a zest for life than to lucky genes, say researchers. A study of 660 volunteers aged 50 or over found those who had more positive perceptions of their own ageing lived an average of seven and a half years longer, even taking into account their income, age and health.

Ageing is, in fact, only 10 per cent genetics and 90 per cent lifestyle, according to research focusing on longevity hotspots around the world.

A US study of ‘super agers’ – those who live beyond 80 – found they shared a more positive outlook than their peers. They were also more sociable, keeping busy long after retirement.

Positive thinking has been linked to stress reduction, which has a knock-on effect on general health and helps to boost the immune system. ‘Negative beliefs and attitudes lead to inactivity, isolation, depression and preventable diseases,’ says Sir Muir Gray, a public health consultant at Oxford University.

LIFE GAIN: Seven and a half years.

Avoid early retirment

Delaying retirement might sound counter-intuitive but it can add years to your life, according to a 2016 study. Researchers at Oregon State University followed 2,956 people and found that healthy adults who retired aged 66, rather than at 65, had an 11 per cent lower risk of death from all causes than those of the same age who had retired earlier.

Even workers who were unhealthy when they retired still had a nine per cent reduced risk of death if they worked for just a year longer.

‘The findings seem to indicate that people who remain active and engaged gain a benefit from that,’ said the researchers.

LIFE GAIN: 11 per cent lower risk of death from all causes at 66.

Become a parent

People with children live at least two years longer than those who are childless, according to a study last year.

Researchers in Sweden tracked 704,481 men and 725,290 women born between 1911 and 1925 and found that the risk of death was greater among those who did not have children.

They say that childless people may not have the same support networks in place, leaving them more vulnerable.

‘Emotional feelings can be just as relevant to our health as overall physical factors,’ says Dr Elizabeth Webb, a researcher at AgeUK.

LIFE GAIN: Two years.

Stay out of hospital

Patients requiring hospital treatment for long periods, for whatever reason, are likelier to die earlier – and not just because they were already sick.

A paper published last October found 7,800 extra deaths occurred between July 2014 and June 2015 in England and Wales where frail, elderly people were stuck in hospital for longer than necessary.

And US research suggests about one-third of patients aged over 70 and more than half of patients over 85 leave hospital more disabled than when they arrive.

‘Hospital settings are dangerous places because you can pick up superbugs such as MRSA or C Difficile more easily,’ says Dr Webb. ‘Good hospitals try to get people discharged as soon as possible.’

LIFE GAIN: No gain but a lower risk of disability or illness.

Go for a walk

Fitness needn’t be exhausting: American and Swedish researchers found people over 40 who take regular brisk walks live longer than those who are inactive.

People following the World Health Organisation weekly minimum of 150 minutes of brisk walking could look forward to up to four and a half years of extra life compared with couch potatoes. Walking briskly for just half the recommended time resulted in an increased life expectancy of nearly two years.

Fitness builds muscle strength and improves cardiovascular health. ‘Unfortunately, fitness is lost starting from the time we get our first desk job, and this has a knock-on effect on our health,’ says Sir Muir.

‘It is always better to struggle to the shops on foot rather than take the car.’

LIFE GAIN: Four and a half years.

Have an active love life

A study of 918 men in the Welsh town of Caerphilly between 1979 and 1993 found those who made love twice a week had a 50 per cent reduced risk of death compared to those who had sex less than once a month. A man who has 350 orgasms a year lives an average of four years longer than a man who has a typical tally of a quarter of that, according to other research.

Women who have regular sex have longer telomeres – a DNA component that indicates longevity. The longer the telomere, the longer the lifespan. Sex raises levels of the feelgood hormone oxytocin and dehydroepiandrosterone, which reduces stress, and increases levels of infection-fighting immunoglobulins in the blood.

LIFE GAIN: Four years for men, increased life expectancy for women.

Drink Greek coffee

Drinking strong coffee could hold the secret to why the population of the Greek island of Ikaria has the highest rate of longevity in the world – one per cent live to 90 compared to the European average of just 0.1 per cent.

Researchers looked at the coffee-drinking habits of 673 inhabitants over the age of 65. They found that 87 per cent consumed Greek coffee – finely ground, and boiled in a tall, narrow pot. And those who did so daily had better cardiovascular health than those who didn’t drink the morning brew.

Greek coffee is rich in chemicals called polyphenols and antioxidants which help mop up damaging free radicals in the blood. It is also relatively low in caffeine compared to instant coffee.

LIFE GAIN: Potentially a tenfold increase in living to 90.

Get enough sleep

Several studies show both people who don’t get enough sleep and those who get too much reduce their life expectancy.

A 2010 study, looking at a million people in eight countries, found sleeping fewer than six hours a night made people 12 per cent more likely to die prematurely.

Meanwhile, sleeping more than nine hours made them 30 per cent more likely to die early.

‘The side effects of sleep deprivation include obesity, heart disease, hypertension and depression,’ says sleep expert Dr Nerina Ramlakhan. ‘However, too much could be a sign that the body is struggling with an underlying illness or depression.’

LIFE GAIN: At age 60, a 12-30 per cent cut in the risk of early death.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/arti ... onger.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 11, 2018 10:53 pm

It sounds too good to be true, but after years of training top bosses, two experts have devised a diet that claims it'll make you slim and rich

    Tim Bean is a fitness guru and author, while Anne Laing is a health campaigner

    Pair have spent years researching the link between weight and looks, and wealth

    Being healthy makes you smarter, more focused, more driven and more credible
We all know the arguments for sorting out our diet, and squeezing in some exercise: better sleep, more energy, a better body, and a healthier, longer life. But did you know that getting healthier could also make you wealthier too?

As experts in anti-ageing and longevity — one of us, Tim, is a fitness guru, author and former C4 broadcaster; the other, Anne, is a health campaigner and London health club owner — we’ve spent years researching the link between diet and wealth. We’ve discovered numerous studies, which show weight and looks can effect career advancement, income and ‘job prestige’.

And, however unfair it seems, for women in particular, the more you lose in extra weight, the more you gain in perceived competence, and vice-versa.

A joint University of Florida and London School of Business study found that slim women earn £5,400 a year more than their larger counterparts, while another study at New York University reported a 0.6 per cent decrease in income for every one per cent increase in body mass.

Totted up over the course of a career, that’s a big boost to your personal net worth.

Better health means more money in the bank, simple as that. Being in great shape with lots of energy makes you smarter, more focused, more driven, more attractive and more credible.

And before you start complaining that you’re too old — that’s nonsense. Age has no bearing on our ability to compete.

Getting fitter and leaner — losing the 4pm slump in energy, ditching the excess weight around the tummy, fixing that chronic lower back pain — is perfectly possible for all of us. A great body operating at peak performance is a powerful business asset for both women and men of any age.

An unhealthy working life — relying on caffeine jolts at your desk, snatching a fat-laden sandwich for lunch and using alcohol to unwind at night — takes its toll physically and psychologically, both of which are bad for your pay packet.

Out of every ten senior managers, research shows that nine are already feeling the effects of burnout to some degree; six have taken time off for stress or stress-related reasons; four are losing sleep worrying about work, and three are overweight.

Sadly, these are the people who will step out of the race first, retiring on a lower income or losing opportunities for promotion and the increased salary that goes with it.

But although the business world is getting tougher, faster and more stressful, that doesn’t mean mid-life office workers should step aside for fresh-faced youngsters, they just have to change the bad habits that are making them weaker, softer and sicker.

Getting healthy is the best way to keep ahead of those upstarts nipping at your heels, and gives you a big advantage over rivals for that amazing new job you’ve always wanted, but never had the energy to go out and get. You’ll look younger, too.

After decades working with business people, including senior directors, entrepreneurs, and clients from seven of the world’s biggest banks, we’ve devised a set of simple rules — The Wealthy Body Plan — to get you into the peak of good health, fitness — and make you richer, too.

Former chief operating officer of Morgan Stanley Europe, Dame Amelia Fawcett, calls it ‘truly revolutionary’. But don’t take her word for it.

Try these 14 quick-win rules to extend your career and improve your earning power...

1. DITCH ALL THAT FOOD ON YOUR DESK

Throw away all the food and drink on your desk or in your drawer. Nutrient-dead foods like biscuits and chocolate bars will sap your energy, leave you foggy-headed and ultimately put you at risk of diseases like diabetes.

Instead re-stock your drawer with these essentials.

    Small bottle of balsamic vinegar or low-fat dressing to drizzle over undressed canteen salads

    A knife, fork, spoon and small plate, for healthy soups and stews brought from home in a flask

    Green tea bags instead of coffee

    A healthy emergency snack such as organic oatcakes for times you can’t leave your desk
2. THE HARD-BOILED EGG IS YOUR FRIEND

Never eat toast at your desk for breakfast. Cut out croissants and banish bagels, too — these are empty fast carbs that will suck the energy out of you.

But don’t skip breakfast altogether or just eat fruit. Start the day on unprocessed foods instead. Try quinoa, a seed that’s high in protein, omega-3 and multi-vitamins, or go for an omelette or scrambled egg from the canteen. Or go hard-boiled. At 80 calories each, hard-boiled eggs are a fantastic, nutrient-dense food to snack on and stop hunger in its tracks.

Put a few in a sandwich bag and take them to the office.

3. PLAN MEALS LIKE YOU DO MEETINGS

Go into your day knowing where and what you’ll be eating, and at what time. You wouldn’t leave business decisions to chance, so don’t do it with your nutrition.

Despite all the fad diet regimes, we still recommend four to five small meals spaced throughout the day. Eating this way is one of the key secrets of staying in shape.

By eating small portions regularly you won’t overload your body with too many calories at one time and your metabolism will remain steady throughout the day.

4. HALVE YOUR COFFEE INTAKE

Caffeine-based drinks are often combined with massive amounts of sugar and other chemicals — even a skinny cappuccino has 100 calories of sugar from the lactose in the milk. But even if you’re drinking it black, from a business performance perspective, caffeine doesn’t work for you.

In raising the stress hormone cortisol, it suppresses testosterone, which is partially responsible for mood and confidence. In the long term, elevated cortisol shortens the attention span and slows the speed at which you process information. It’s not good for the business brain.

5. EAT LITTLE AND OFTEN

When buying lunch, buy a second portion to eat at 4pm. But make the portions small. And whatever you do, do not purchase a ham sandwich (which remains the most popular British lunch, sadly).

In fact, ditch the processed, carb-heavy sandwiches altogether. Replace with dishes such as chicken salad, sushi, three-bean soup, veg sticks with hummus or bring in your own healthy, veg-based stews. Aim for eight to nine portions of vegetables per day.

PS: don’t be afraid to break out your own meal if meetings overrun and lunch becomes an unhealthy sharing platter. Tuck into your tuna and oatcakes with pride. You want to be clear-headed later, not in a fat-laden muffin-induced fog.

6. AVOID THE OFFICE MICROWAVE

Research demonstrates there is a loss of nutrition in food that’s been microwaved. One study found that broccoli zapped in the microwave lost up to 97 per cent of its beneficial antioxidants, the natural compounds many scientists believe protect against disease, while steamed broccoli lost 11 per cent.

If the office kitchen doesn’t have a hob, eat your veg raw.

7. HAVE MEETINGS AFTER THE GYM

Enter your gym time in your diary and treat it as you would a meeting with your boss.

Yes, you have meetings and emails, a hellish commute, a family you want to see in the evening, and way too many other demands on your time. But so does everyone else.

Thirty minutes a day in the gym isn’t wasted time; it’s enough to build strength, fitness, and shape and above all it’s an investment in your future.

The best time to work out is first thing in the morning when your growth hormone levels are at their peak, but any time is better than none.

Try to schedule difficult meetings for immediately after going to the gym — studies show that concentration and mental performance is better then.

If you can’t leave the office, keep a set of dumbbells by your desk, and whenever you get 60 seconds free, blast through a quick set of press-ups, curls or squats.

Remember that when you’re sitting you’re burning almost the same calories as you would be lying down. Take your phone calls standing up.

8. MEASURE YOUR WAIST EVERY WEEK

Take your waist circumference measurement an inch above the navel. Men should measure less than 38in; women less than 30in. Anything above this moves you into high-risk territory for many diseases, including heart attack, stroke, dementia and diabetes.

By checking each week, you can watch this crucial measurement come down gradually and know your health is improving.

Your prospects will improve at the same time. Looking good tells your clients that you take your health seriously enough to be of the best use to them. It’s an obvious win-win.

9. ORDER OFF THE MENU

Never hesitate to ask for food to be prepared exactly the way you want it. We are continually amazed at the number of very senior people in business who don’t seem to have the backbone to ask for their food to be cooked the way they need it to be. Who is paying whom here?

Order wholefood nutrient-dense items you can find on any menu, or which can be easily prepared in the kitchen. Eggs. Fish. Chicken. Ask for meat and fish steamed or grilled or poached with sauces or dressings ‘on the side’.

You don’t need to see the menu to know what you want. And don’t feel bad about asking for a half-portion; the size of restaurant helpings are often too big to be healthy.

10. EAT BEFORE YOU GO OUT

A small dish of something healthy at home means that you’ll have staved off hunger pangs and can then order something equally small and healthy at the restaurant.

11. KEEP BOOZE TO A MINIMUM

Don’t drink alcohol during the working week. Drinking is an accepted part of business culture, but don’t be fooled into thinking it’s healthy.

If you consume too much of it, a bottle of fine red wine costing hundreds will make you ill in just the same way as too much cheap fizzy lager. Alcohol is a neurotoxin, a diuretic, a depressant and a carcinogen.

We say it’s OK to have a drink or two on a special occasion, but note the word ‘special’. Evenings are not special occasions — they happen every day.

If you’re drinking with clients and they insist on pouring you a glass, take a sip and then sit on it all evening — no one will notice.

Or ask for fizzy water with a dash of apple juice, drink it from a champagne glass and stick to it. Ignore the pressure, especially on business trips when everyone’s at the hotel bar.

Instead, play a strategic game: you’re the one who’ll negotiate the best deal the next day, not the woman drinking G&Ts.

12. DON’T CHEAT ON YOUR BEAUTY SLEEP

You can’t perform at work without quality sleep so go to bed earlier. Sleep deprivation affects the hippocampus of the brain — the part that operates memory — and also affects hormonal processes by which we feel and respond to hunger, making us eat more.

So aim to get to bed about 10.30pm every night. Sleep research shows your brain cells regenerate better by getting to bed earlier. Shut down your email alerts and turn off your smartphone after dinner.

If you’re a nightbird, try bringing your bedtime back by 15 minutes a night so that the change is a gradual one.

13. DE-STRESS WITH SOME ‘DESKERCISE’

Manage stress at your desk by tilting, tipping and turning. Modern stress is a by-product of the old evolutionary reaction to a threat — the physiological fight or flight response, which releases a series of chemicals into our blood stream to prepare us for action.

But in an office it isn’t appropriate to leap across the desk and strangle a colleague, and running away isn’t an option either.

In many cases, the source of our stress — time pressure, decision-making, workload — is a ‘threat’ we can’t even see.

One of the best ways to avoid boiling over is to take time out to relieve physical tension in the shoulders and neck.

Tip your head straight up, jutting the chin forwards. Tilt your head slowly to the left, then the right, feeling a stretch down the outside of the neck.

Turn your head smoothly to look over your left, then right, shoulder. Repeat three times.

14. PRIORITISE YOUR SEX LIFE :ymdevil:

Read any biography of a successful CEO and you’ll see they never over-fill their schedules (OK, with the exception of Tesla boss Elon Musk, but even he acknowledges that he works too hard).

They know how to say no to tasks of lesser value in order to focus on those items that yield the most — like exercise. They always factor in time for exercise.

It’s important to keep your personal relationship in tip-top condition too. Sadly, many surveys of busy older executives ranked their sex life somewhere between ‘yawn’ and ‘awful’. And they were the ones who were being honest . . .

A 25-year study by a leading U.S. university of people aged 60 to 96 found that women who said they enjoyed their sex lives lived seven to eight years longer than those who were indifferent.

The same applied to men, though it was the quantity rather than the quality of sex that made the difference there. So pay attention to your intimate life outside the office; it’ll keep you feeling and looking younger.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/arti ... -rich.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Mon Nov 12, 2018 5:11 am

This so called fitness guru shows the shortest path to mental disorders, from anorexia to compulsive over eating :lol:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Nov 12, 2018 7:02 pm

I am never able to plan meals in advance as I am not always sure who is going to come and cook for me, or better still take me out ;)

Left to my own devices, i normally have a salad :D

Re ordering off menu:

In the past, when I have lived near a restaurant, on quiet midweek nights, I have phoned in advance and asked the chef to do me something exciting with chicken or fish

Chefs love the chance to experiment and show off, so I have had some really fantastic meals :D

Highly recommended if you have a local restaurant you visit regularly :ymparty:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Tue Nov 13, 2018 5:21 am

Currently, I tried ready made meal (but quite healthy), to change the monotony of my diet menu. Lost 6 kg (8 to lost, yet).

But now Papillon's diet starts. He takes weight too fast :lol:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:39 am

Piling wrote:Currently, I tried ready made meal (but quite healthy), to change the monotony of my diet menu. Lost 6 kg (8 to lost, yet).

But now Papillon's diet starts. He takes weight too fast :lol:


I suspect you spoilt Papillon with too many treats :ymdevil:
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Nov 14, 2018 5:38 am

I suspect you spoilt Papillon with too many treats :ymdevil:


Guilty. :|
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:36 am

12 things you must stop storing in the fridge immediately

1. Tomatoes

Tomatoes only belong in the fridge once they've started to ripen and as a way to keep them fresh.

Speaking to FEMAIL, nutritionist Aloysa Hourigan from NAQ Nutrition said tomatoes fare better away from the cold but can be stored in the crisper when they reach their ripeness.

'Once they reach their ripeness they can go in the fridge otherwise they start to spoil...but tomatoes won't ripen in the fridge by themselves.'

2 Bread

Storing bread in the fridge might seem like a way to keep it fresher longer, but this isn't actually the case.

'Putting it in the fridge will dry it out so if you are not going to eat it fast, then the better option is to freeze it and get slices out as you need them,' Ms Hourigan advised.

3. Potatoes

If you want to keep the flavour of potatoes longer, don't store these in the fridge.

While the cold can help with freshness, this will also affect how they taste when it comes to cooking.

Ms Hourigan said: 'Potatoes should never be stored in the fridge, the best way to store them, as well as onions, is in a cool dark place like the bottom of the pantry

For better results, remove potatoes from plastic packaging first.

Storing potatoes in the fridge could mean tasteless spuds when it comes to cooking

4. Coffee

Those with a taste for fresh coffee will do better storing their favourite brand in the cupboard rather than in the cool confines of their fridge.

If coffee is stored in the refrigerator, the condensation can affect its flavour.

Instead, keep your beans or grinds fresh by storing them in an airtight jar or container.

5. Spreads

When it comes to storing spreads in the fridge, Ms Hourigan said to make sure you check the label first for instructions.

Spreads that are high in salt like Vegemite and peanut butter are well-preserved so refrigeration isn't necessary, she explained.

'With things like jams, the high sugar content means you don't have to store it in the fridge but it's wise to as they are prone to mould development over time.'

What foods should always be kept in the fridge?

    Mustard

    Tomato sauce

    Soy sauce

    Grapes

    Eggs

    Milk

    All meat

    Horseradish

    Maple syrup

    Ripe bananas

    Fruit spreads

    All cheeses

    100 per cent fruit juice

    Yoghurt
6. Fruit

When it comes to storing fruit, those such as bananas do better when kept on the bench or pantry.

Apples and oranges can also be stored like this, although once ripened they may last longer if kept in the crisper.

Soft fruit such as grapes, figs and berries fare better when chilled, but again ensure fruit is ripe before refrigerating.

'Berries - especially strawberries - ripen up much better out of the fridge, however, they will spoil fairly quickly so you need to pick the perfect time,' Ms Hourigan recommends.

Those with a taste for fresh coffee will do better storing their favourite brand in the cupboard rather than in the cool confines of their fridge (stock image)

7. Garlic

Garlic fares much better when stored in a cool, dark place which makes your pantry the ideal spot.

However, once it has been peeled it will need to be stored in the fridge.

'If they are whole bulbs they can just sit in a dish or container near where food is prepared,' the nutritionist suggests.

'Once you've peeled it, however, it is better off in the fridge as it won't retain it's flavour otherwise.'

8. Oils

While it's not uncommon to store oils in the fridge to stop them going rancid, some do better when stored on the cupboard shelf.

Ms Hourigan advises to steer clear of storing olive oil at the fridge as exposure to light can decrease its antioxidant activity.

9. Chocolate

Whether or not to store chocolate in the fridge is a divisive issue with some claiming they won't touch this treat unless its icy cold.

However, according to New Zealand-based chocolate expert Luke Owen Smith there's absolutely never any reason to store chocolate in the fridge at all.

According to Mr Owen, chocolate which is stored in the fridge becomes 'dull' and 'doesn't release the flavours'.

Instead, he said chocolate should be stored in a 'cool, dark and dry place' as 'extremely cold temperatures can mess with the temper as much as hot temperatures can'.

According to New Zealand-based chocolate expert Luke Owen Smith there's absolutely never any reason to store chocolate in the fridge at all (stock image)

10. Butter

Butter also tends to fare better when stored covered than it does in the fridge.

The cream used to make butter is pasteurised, which repels bacteria and lengthens its shelf life.

It's also mostly fat (at least 80 per cent) - high fat combined with a low water content makes it less friendly to bacterial growth.

However, soaring temperatures in Australia during summer may well require keeping butter in the fridge to prevent it from melting.

11. Nail polish

There's an old wives' tale that's been around for years that storing nail polish in the fridge extends its life.

But as it turns out, this isn't the case and in fact, storing nail polish in the fridge can ruin it by causing it to thicken and become gloopy.

For optimal storage, keep your polishes in a dark drawer, away from light.

12. Batteries

There is a myth that storing batteries at a lower temperature decreases the rate at which they lose their charge.

And while there are those who swear this is the case, optimal storage is away from direct sunlight, and somewhere that's warm and dry.

'The perfect temperature for most batteries is 15 degrees Celsius, but a little warmer doesn't harm your batteries,' information on Panasonic's site read.

'What you should however always respect is that direct sunlight should be avoided at all times, as the number one enemy of batteries is heat.'

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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Piling » Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:46 am

I never imagined that people store such things in their fridge : bread ? potatoes ? coffee ? oil ? garlic ? :shock:
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