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Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate change

This is where you can talk about every subject (previously it was called shout room)

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri May 31, 2019 11:00 am

Humans have just 30 YEARS to prevent climate CATASTROPHE

David Wallace-Wells, author of the new book ‘The Uninhabitable Earth - Life After Warming’ warned not long is left to prevent the end of the world. Mr Wallace-Wells believes humanity needs to reduce manufacturing by 30 percent in 30 years or face inevitable catastrophe. The US journalist told Here and Now podcast: “Projections estimate that if we don’t change course on global warming, we could have a global GDP that’s 30 percent smaller than it would be without climate change.

“That’s an impact that’s twice as big as the Great Depression, and it would be permanent.

“We need such dramatic interventions in every sector of our world, from our energy, to our transportation, to our infrastructure, our agriculture.

“Absolutely every aspect of modern life has a carbon footprint, and we need to not just reduce those carbon footprints, we need to eliminate them entirely.”

A plethora of problems come with climate change – not least a mass extinction which is currently underway.

The United Nations recently released a a report which says human activity is destroying the planet and is on course to obliterating wildlife, which could ultimately lead to the downfall of humanity

Several factors are involved, according to the report, such as a loss of forests, pollution, clean drinking water and destroying the habitats of small insects which are vital to the ecosystem.

The report “painstakingly catalogues how humanity has undermined the natural resources upon which its very survival depends”.

The document states human activity has altered 40 percent of the marine environment, 50 percent of inland waterways, and three quarters of the land on Earth.

It warns “subsidies to fisheries, industrial agriculture, livestock raising, forestry, mining and the production of biofuel, or fossil fuel energy encourage waste, inefficiency, and over-consumption”.

It said: “Half-a-million to a million species are projected to be threatened with extinction, many within decades.”

https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/ ... extinction
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Jun 02, 2019 7:33 pm

Turkey’s plastic waste imports
from the UK are booming


Itinerant garbage pickers run down the hilly streets of Istanbul, their trolleys packed with plastic and other waste

Their haul is a boon for the recycling industry in Turkey. “We collect 80% of the waste from the streets,” said Recep Karaman, head of the street waste collectors association.

But imports of plastic waste from the UK are increasing, and Karaman says it could damage the income he and his colleagues earn from garbage picking.

“3.5m of the 6m tonnes of waste produced annually is collected by us,” he said. “But our earnings drop due to imports; they decrease the value of the waste we collect.”

Waste collectors are holding out hope that a new protocol by the government will protect and secure the jobs of the 500,000 collectors, while also protecting the environment and the economic potential of waste in Turkey.

Following restrictions on imports of UK plastic waste imposed by Malaysia and Vietnam and now being considered in Poland, the rise in the tonnage of containers landing on Turkish shores is causing growing concern.

According to data submitted by UK exporters to the Environment Agency (EA) and seen by the Guardian, in the first three months of 2018 the UK shipped 27,034 tonnes of waste plastic to Turkey, compared with 12,022 tonnes in the same period the previous year.

Last year Turkey probably overtook Poland and became the second-biggest receiver of UK plastic, according to the data.

Yet the EA has not visited the country to check whether UK plastic packaging waste is actually being recycled or reused or if the process is being carried out to a standard that prevents leakage into rivers and the ocean.

It is illegal for UK companies to export waste for disposal abroad other than for recycling or recovery, but the rigour with which the EA enforces the law has been seriously questioned by the National Audit Office.

A glance at Turkey’s record on recycling does not reassure environmental observers. According to OECD data from 2015, Turkey recycles just 1% of its domestic waste, sending the rest to landfill.

Research published in the journal Science lists Turkey as among the top 20 countries in the world for mismanaging plastic waste.

Municipalities in Turkey, who are responsible for collecting the waste, gathered 31m tonnes in 2016. According to the statistical institute in Turkey, only 9.8% was sent to recycling centres, with the rest stored in landfills.

Yağmur Cengiz, general manager of Pagcev (Recycling Entity of the Turkish Plastic Industry Foundation), said far more recycling and collection plants were needed to cope; currently there are 751 licensed recycling plants and 566 collection and separation sites.

And there are concerns within Turkey that UK plastic waste could damage its own environment. Vedat Kılıç, head of Tudam, the recyclable waste industrialists association, said on one hand the increase in imports of plastic waste to Turkey was an opportunity for the growing plastic products industry that makes synthetic yarn and shopping bags. The sector had begun to make major profits within the past two years, and investments have led to the establishment of new businesses.

But he warned that imports need to be controlled. Speaking at a conference held this year entitled Fire in the Waste Sector! Don’t Let Turkey Be the Garbage Dump of the World, Kiliç said uncontrolled imports of plastic waste from Europe were damaging Turkey environmentally and economically. Kilic said the increase in imports could put the zero-waste policy launched by Emine Erdogan, the president’s wife, at risk.

Away from the hills where Istanbul’s waste collectors ply their trade, Sedat Gündoğdu, an academic at the Cukurova University Faculty of Fisheries, is tracking the impact of plastic waste in the Mediterranean.

According to his studies, the coast of Turkey is the most polluted in the whole of the Mediterranean. He puts this down to agricultural activities, underdeveloped infrastructure, a rise in urbanism and inefficient waste management policies.

The southern coastal cities of Mersin, Adana and Antalya produce more plastic waste than any others in Turkey. ‘‘Any heavy rain carries this waste through rivers spilling them into the sea,” he said.

As well as the discarded plastic waste, some raw materials such as virgin plastic can leach into the sea through sewage systems of the facilities during the recycling procedures, he said.

The impact is visible along the 22km length of Akyatan beach. One of the most important green turtle nesting areas in the region, it is now littered with significant plastic pollution.

Increased imports of UK plastic waste could add to the problem, much of which is contaminated to levels as high as 9.5%, according to NAO data.

Gündoğdu said recycling was not the solution: ‘‘The only solution is to decrease plastic consumption, otherwise everyone, including Europeans coming for holiday to the coast of Mediterranean, might end up swimming along in their own waste.’’

As the crisis escalates…

… in our natural world, we refuse to turn away from the climate catastrophe and species extinction. For The Guardian, reporting on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature and pollution the prominence it deserves, stories which often go unreported by others in the media.

At this pivotal time for our species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on scientific facts, not political prejudice or business interests.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... -what-cost
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:42 am

Pigs are being buried alive as China's African swine fever crisis deepens

Some Chinese pig producers are resorting to mass live burials as authorities struggle to control a deadly pig virus ravaging the world's biggest commercial herd

Key points:
    The African swine fever virus does not affect humans, but kills pigs
    A virulent strain has spread to more than 55 countries on three continents
    In China and Vietnam, more than 2 million pigs have been destroyed
African swine fever (ASF) does not affect humans, but can cause up to 100 per cent mortality in herds of wild and domestic pigs within a week.

Pigs mainly contract the virus through the consumption of contaminated pork products and feed.

A particularly virulent strain has spread to more than 55 countries on three continents, affecting more than 77 per cent of the world's swine population, according to veterinary scientists.

The spread has been driven by migrating wild populations and human movement of contaminated pork products that harbour the virus for as long as six months.

The chief veterinary officers of the World Organisation for Animal Health's (OIE) 182-member countries are meeting in Paris this week to focus on finding a vaccine.

As the international effort to find a vaccine mounts, Australian farmers and biosecurity authorities are preparing for the worst.
'The dead-pig pit'

Dead pig burial in China

Since February, Hebei Xinda Livestock Company has culled 20,000 pigs, 6,000 of which were buried alive.

African swine fever facts:
    The virus is a highly contagious disease that can affect domestic and wild pigs
    It is usually fatal in infected pigs
    There is no treatment or vaccine available
    The most likely sources of infection are pork products, porcine genetic material and incursions by infected pigs

One of the many companies devastated by the spread of the contagion through China's multi-billion-dollar pork industry is the Hebei Xinda Livestock Company.

The company's general manager, Li Sixu, said ASF was having a huge impact on China.

"It has completely destroyed China's pork industry," Ms Li said.

"We also sell livestock feed — sales are down by 80 per cent."

Ms Li has recently overseen the live burial of 6,000 pigs and disposal of a further 15,000 already struck down by the virus.

"In February, we realised pigs were dying at an alarming speed. First 200 a day, then 300, then 500," she said.

"We suspected it was African swine fever and after confirmation, we started burying pigs alive.

Live pig burials

China's Government has reportedly promised to crackdown on illegal disposal of pigs amid protests from international animal welfare groups.

Ms Li described those days as "very sad".

"Lots of employees were crying with tears running down their faces. They raised the big pigs from [piglets]," she said.

Footage of what appears to be thousands of pigs writhing in mass graves has recently emerged on social media.

China's Government has reportedly promised to crackdown on the practice amid condemnation from international animal welfare groups.

The Australian Department of Agriculture's chief veterinary officer and president of the OIE, Mark Schipp, said the inhumane and illegal disposal of pigs was hampering containment efforts.

"There are reports of pig being buried alive, thrown into rivers, and being sold by farmers to try and recoup their income because they're not sure of getting compensation, and that continues to spread the disease even further," he said.

Underestimated epidemic

Domestic pigs

China is the world's biggest pork producer and raises about half the world's commercial pig population.

Chinese officials have confirmed 129 ASF outbreaks and the destruction of about 1 million pigs.

However, Dr Schipp suspects the real figures in China are far greater.

Dr Mark Schipp

World Organisation for Animal Health president Mark Schipp says there is an international effort to find a commercial vaccine.

The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (UN) said the speed and severity of the outbreaks could be worse than currently assumed.

The virus has spread to all of China's 31 provinces, and is now endemic, or entrenched in the pig populations of Tibet and Xinjiang Uygur.

International estimates expect China's ASF outbreak will reduce its pork production by 20–35 per cent, or as much as 200 million pigs.

There are growing fears the pandemic could reach Australia as it spreads through South East Asian nations, such as Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam.

"As we've seen in China and Vietnam in recent months, once the disease becomes established it becomes very difficult, if not impossible to eradicate," Dr Schipp said.

The biggest threat to Australia's biosecurity is overseas travellers flouting biosecurity measures at the border.

In the past six months, Australian authorities have confiscated 17 tonnes of pork products from air passengers and two tonnes in the mail.

During two rounds of testing at two Australian airports in December and January biosecurity authorities seized 46 pork products contaminated with ASF.

Dawson Bradford fears an outbreak of ASF is "inevitable".

Australian industry fears

If the virus reached Australian pigs Dr Schipp said pork export markets would shut down immediately.

"It would paint a very bleak picture for the Australian pork industry if even one farm became infected," he said.

"In the event a farm in Australia became infected, we would slaughter out the entire farm, decontaminate and disinfect that property, so it would be out of business for some months."

Flame throwers and disinfection

China has officially reported 129 outbreaks and the destruction of 1 million pigs.

Dawson Bradford, president of the West Australian Pork Producers Association and a pig farmer near the WA town of Narrogin, said an incursion was inevitable.

"The Americans are talking about 'when they'll get it', not 'if they get it'," Mr Bradford said.

Spanish veterinary scientists recently claimed to have identified a vaccine for Europe's wild boar population, but Dr Schipp said a vaccine for domestic pigs was yet to be developed.

Meanwhile, Mr Bradford said some domestic pig producers were already vetting their biosecurity measures.

"A lot of farms will not allow any visitors on, and some have even gone to the point where ham for workers' lunches, and all pork products are not allowed on farm," he said.

Challenges and opportunities

Domestic pigs

Australia grain markets could be negatively affected by the spread of ASF, however, rising meat prices could benefit livestock producers.

The UN's recently published report on global food markets noted the potential changes in production and consumption patterns as a result of China's ASF epidemic.

China is the world's biggest importer of soybean and because of this, Rabobank senior grains and oilseed analyst, Cheryl Kalisch Gordon, said first and foremost the oilseed market would be affected.

The market shift may also flow through to Australia's feed grain markets.

But if Australia can remain free of ASF, the decimation of Asia's pork supplies could bring opportunities.

Australian Pork Ltd chairman, David Lock, said ASF could take 20 million tonnes of pork off the world market and push up the price of all animal protein.

"Given there is insufficient production of pork in the world to fill the hole created by China's production, we'd expect to see other meats also start to fill that gap," Mr Lock said.

China will also begin importing more pork from overseas and Australia is currently negotiating export protocols.

However, Mr Lock said Australia's comparatively small production would never match our major trading partner's growing demand.

"The opportunity for Australia is to gradually increase production and prices to fill gaps that other markets can't supply," he said.

The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN says the speed and severity of China's outbreaks could be worse than currently assumed.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/rural ... VVdsALPA3s
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:46 am

We're hopping mad! Tell Chewy: No kangaroo meat!

Despite being Australia's national symbol, millions of kangaroos are slaughtered—the largest land-based killing of wild animals in the world. In 2018 alone, nearly 7 million kangaroos will be killed. Many of these kangaroos end up as pet food sold on Chewy.com

This is an Australian government sanctioned bloodbath and Chewy is complicit. It is a mass-scale profit-driven slaughter of kangaroos for their meat, leather and pelts.

Adult kangaroos are shot. Hundreds of thousands of joeys (baby kangaroos) are clubbed, shot or decapitated after their mothers are killed. And, larger young but non-pouched orphaned kangaroos are left to die. Like the African elephant, this massive slaughter could eliminate them.

Companies like Pets At Home in Australia and every single supermarket chain in the United Kingdom have stopped selling kangaroo meat for pets and humans. David Beckham stopped wearing kangaroo skin shoes. Dame Judi Dench has spoken out in support of the plight of kangaroos.

Millions of animals including sheep, cows, chickens, rabbits, and pigs are already senselessly killed to become pet food every year. It's time for Chewy to take what is hopefully the first of many steps towards extending their compassion beyond domesticated dogs and cats, join other international retailers and BAN ALL kangaroo products.

https://www.drove.com/campaign/5bf32ea0 ... UGSeWWEtAU
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:52 pm

World Ocean's Day:
Amazing inventions currently cleaning our oceans

Despite its sheer size, you don’t even have to dive beneath the surface of the ocean to see the damage man-made pollution has made and continues to make.

One only has to look between California and Hawaii, to an area of trash referred to as the Great Pacific Garbage patch, the size of Texas, to understand the impact humans are having.

If seeing isn't believing then the stats tell their own damning story. The World Economic Forum stated in 2016 that every minute, a garbage truck full of plastic is dumped into the ocean.

According to UNESCO, more than 220 million tonnes of plastic are produced each year. Ocean dead zones, areas that have incredibly low levels of oxygen, now number 500 and cover 245,000 sq. km, which is the size of the United Kingdom.

More and more efforts are being made to tackle the damaging effects of the Anthropocene era. Humans’ drive to innovate may have brought about the epoch, but now the same drive is being used to come up with amazing technology to counteract it.

To mark World Oceans Day, here are seven amazing innovations that are being used to clean the ocean:

The Ocean Cleanup’s Wilson pipe

One of the more high-profile innovations, the Ocean Cleanup Project is the brainchild of 24-year-old Dutch inventor Boyan Slat. He came up with it as a way of tackling the trash making up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

The project involved using a $20million 2,000 feet-long unmanned floating pipe called Wilson, curved into the shape of a U by the currents, that would ‘eat up’ the trash in the Garbage Patch like Pac-Man. It was let loose in September 2018.

However, by January, strong winds had damaged Wilson enough for it to be returned back to dry land for repairs. Despite this Slat remained optimistic, telling NBC News at the time: 'We always took into account that we might have to take it back and forth a few times. So it's really not a significant departure from the original plan.'

One of the more high-profile innovations, the Ocean Cleanup Project is the brainchild of a 24-year-old Dutch inventor Boyan Slat

The Seabin project

Invented by two Aussie surfers, the Seabin is pretty much exactly what you think: it’s a large flowerpot-shaped container that captures everything from plastic bottles, bags and utensils, as well as trash as small as 2mm. A pump at the bottom of the bin sucks in water and rubbish, which are then separated by a mesh unit inside. The water is then released, while the trash is recycled.

The seabins are fitted around marinas and coasts, trapping rubbish before it can make its way into the ocean proper. According to the Seabin website, each bin can catch 90,000 plastic bags a year, nearly 36,000 disposable cups, 16,500 plastic bottles and 166,500 plastic utensils. There are over 700 Seabins located around the world, with many concentrated along the coasts of European countries.

A pump at the bottom of the bin sucks in water and rubbish, which are then separated by a mesh unit inside

Recycling Technologies

Capturing plastic in the oceans is one thing, but what to do with it once it’s back on land? According to the UN, less than one tenth of plastic produced gets recycled. However, one UK company has come up with an ingenious way of dealing with types of plastic that are ‘unrecyclable’— before they even make it into our waters.

Rather than let many types of plastic get sent to landfills, be incinerated or exported, Recycling Technologies has come up with another solution: melt it, and then turn it into an oil that can then be turned into everything from new packaging to wax for waterproofing, product surface coating and more.

Major brands such as Tesco in the UK are working with the company to improve its recycling options. The company says that for every tonne of plastic processed at its plant, 1.8 tonnes of carbon equivalent can be saved.

Rather than let many types of plastic get sent to landfills, be incinerated or exported, Recycling Technologies has come up with another solution: melt it, and then turn it into an oil that can be used for many different purposes

Mr Trash Wheel

With Wilson and Seabin, the ocean cleanup initiative is producing quite the cast of characters. However, neither one is as kooky as Mr Trash Wheel, which looks like a miniature cross between a weepul and a paddle steamer.

Created by Baltimore local John Kellett back in 2008, the googly-eyed environmentally-friendly monster is located at the bottom of the Jones Falls watershed, which empties into the Baltimore Harbor. There, with its trash-capturing conveyor belt mouth, Mr Trash Wheel has collected over 1.5 million pounds of trash since May 2014.

During a 2015 rainstorm, Mr Trash Wheel really got his fill, scooping up as much as 19 tons of garbage in one day. Due to its local success, the Mr Trash Wheel family has expanded to include Professor Trash Wheel and Captain Trash Wheel.

Created by Baltimore local John Kellett back in 2008, the googly-eyed environmentally-friendly monster is located at the bottom of the Jones Falls watershed

Plastic-eating enzyme

An innovation that has a profound impact on plastic was created completely by accident. Back in April 2018, scientists announced that they inadvertently created an enzyme called PETase that can break polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics down to its original chemicals.

This is seen as a breakthrough because PET, which is used to make packaging by the food and drink industry, is extremely hard to break down into a state that would allow it to be recycled into other high-quality plastic products, instead coming out as a lower-grade and therefore less-valuable product.

Back in April 2018, scientists announced that they inadvertently created an enzyme called PETase that can break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics down to its original chemicals

This means that new high-quality plastic packaging still has to be made. However, with the discovery of PETase, it is hoped the recycling loop can be closed so that old PET products get recycled into products of the same high-quality.

WasteShark

Referred to as the ‘Wall-E of the water’ the WasteShark is an aquadrone that sucks up garbage from the water.

Created by RanMarine, a Dutch environmental technology company, the WasteShark was initially deployed in the Dubai Marina. It can swim for up to 16 hours and consume as much as 1,100lbs of trash.

Referred to as the ‘Wall-E of the water’ the WasteShark is an aquadrone that sucks up garbage from the water

It collects everything from floating trash, plastic and even microplastic. It has sensors that measure everything from pH, nitrate, water salinity and chloride. Once the trash is collected, the aquadrone delivers it to the collection point.

PlanetCare’s washing machine filter

PlanetCare approaches the issue of ocean pollution from a different angle. Rather than dealing with the plastic pollution that has already made it out into the open water, the Slovenian company designed a product that tackles it at source.

PlanetCare's focus is microfibres in clothing. These strands, as small as 0.5mm, are too small to be captured by machine wash filters, and ultimately make their way into the ocean.

The company’s focus is microfibres on items of clothing such as fleeces. These strands, as small as 0.5mm are too small to be captured by machine wash filters, and ultimately make their way into the ocean, where they are mistaken for food by marine life. The fish can then suffocate on the fibers which can also attract toxins.

PlanetCare has created a special washing machine filter that is designed to capture the fibres shed from clothes during washes, which can add up to as many as 700,000 per average 6kg wash.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech ... ceans.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:27 am

Mission to eradicate plastic in canals

The canals and rivers of England and Wales could be plastic-free in a year if every visitor picked up one piece of litter, a charity says

The Canal and River Trust said 14 million items of plastic ended up in waterways each year.

The charity said it was "on a mission to eradicate plastic" and urged people to pick up any rubbish they find.

It added that canals and rivers acted as "plastic highways", which was a "huge problem for wildlife".

The trust worked with Coventry University to carry out research for a new report.

It took a "snapshot" of the amount of plastics and litter observed at representative locations along 2,000 miles of waterways and found plastics such as bags, bottles, disposable cups and food wrappers accounted for 59% of the waste.

Locations included Leicester, Birmingham, Sheffield, Burnley, Devizes, Tottenham Hale, Torfaen, Milton Keynes, Manchester, Ellesmere Port, Brentford, Worcester, Stratford-upon-Avon, Liverpool, Hemel Hempstead, Oxford and Erewash.

Peter Birch, national environmental policy advisor at the trust, said: "By taking a little care of their local waterway, everyone can have beauty on their doorstep.

"The Canal and River Trust is on a mission to eradicate plastics from our vast network of canals and rivers - helping us all to live in better, more beautiful neighbourhoods, whilst tackling a global issue, and making life better by water."

The latest study found litter was being dropped over boundary walls from nearby buildings, off bridges and being blown or washed in from areas near the waterways.

The charity said the volume of plastics in its waterways was "a huge problem for wildlife"

The trust said it made a great effort to minimise litter along waterways and emptied 900 public litter bins more than 46,000 times annually.

Volunteers for the charity spend more than 100,000 hours clearing litter from towpaths and canals each year.

What questions do you have about this story? Use the form below and we could be in touch.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-48516745
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 06, 2019 9:11 pm

Sea turns red with blood as whales slaughtered on Faroe Islands ‘brutal’ cull

SLAUGHTERED whales turned the sea surrounding Denmark’s Faroe Island a horrific bright red as more than a dozen of the creatures were brutally killed as part of the fifth annual cull condemned by activists worldwide

Haunting images showed a coastal graveyard of dead whales of all ages and sizes cruelly picked as part of a mass slaughter that takes place in the arpeggio ever year. The tradition has been widely condemned and compared with other acts of animal cruelty such as the Yulin Dog Meat Festival. Dolphins are also targeted by those who chose to take part in the cull.

The waters in the North Atlantic island turn red ever year as part of a tradition called the Grindadráp by Danish residents.

The throats of the animals are sliced open and their bodies are left on the coast where blood trickles into the water.

The Faroese authorities have long maintained these events are not cruel and are carried out in accordance with international law as well as being sustainable and regulated.

Though the act has been widely condemned by activists.

One group claimed in the 2017 cull they saw more than 634 whales and dolphins killed.

One campaigner said their senses are still haunted by the "smell of death".

The activist said: "I am at home by my desk but I can still smell the sickening and pungent smell of death when I remember my time in Hvannasund.

"Men are carrying knives and ropes getting high on blood with the ritual killing of magnificent sentient beings for the sake of tradition.

"The entire community are enjoying the massacre. Danish tourists are considering themselves so damn fortunate."

The activist added: "I am told many times how blessed I am for the privilege of witnessing a Grind.

"Only a sadistic mind could see beauty in murder and suffering.

“A horrific and sad experience of senseless destruction. It will haunt me until I see the end of this obsolete and bloody tradition. Only then, I would be able to let them go in peace, knowing that no other whale or dolphin will suffer in their hands."

The Faroese authorities have told the Express previously: "Whale catches in the Faroe Islands are conducted in accordance with international law and globally recognised principles of sustainable development.

"Catches are sustainable and fully regulated by national laws and regulations, with a strong emphasis on animal welfare, and a requirement today for participants to be licenced to use the mandatory methods and equipment.

"Whale drives only take place in bays that are officially approved for the purpose, and only schools of whales found in close proximity to land, usually within one nautical mile, are driven ashore.

"The law explicitly states that the hunt is to be conducted in such a way as to cause as little suffering to the whales as possible.

"When the whales have beached themselves, they are killed. It takes a few seconds to kill each whale, and the entire pod is normally killed in less than ten minutes.

"The use of a spinal lance, designed by a Faroese veterinarian, ensures that the whales lose consciousness and die within a few seconds.

"The lance is inserted once through the animal's neck to break its spinal cord.

"The pilot whale hunt is dramatic and bloody by its nature. Entire pods of whales are killed on shores and in shallow bays at open sight. Naturally, this results in a lot of blood in the water."

https://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/1 ... l-pictures

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:22 am

Animals Granted Same Rights as People, Indian Court Rules

More animals in India have been granted legal personhood. The Punjab and Haryana High Court has given animals in Haryana the status of a “legal person or entity,” per The Indian Express

Animals living in the North Indian state now have the “corresponding rights, duties, and liabilities of a living person” thanks to the new animal protection law.

The ruling aims to “protect and promote greater welfare of animals,” according to Justice Rajiv Sharma, who wrote the order.

Animals, including avian and aquatic beings, “cannot be treated as objects or property.”

“The animals should be healthy, comfortable, well nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior without pain, fear, and distress,” Sharma said.

“They are entitled to justice.”

“We have to show compassion towards all living creatures. Animals may be mute but we as a society have to speak on their behalf. No pain or agony should be caused to the animals. Cruelty to animals also causes psychological pain to them,” he continued.

“In Hindu Mythology, every animal is associated with god. Animals breathe like us and have emotions. The animals require food, water, shelter, normal behavior, medical care, self-determination.”

The order named Haryana citizens “persons in loco parentis” of animals in the state, referring to the legal responsibility to take on some of the roles of a parent.

Animals Granted Same Rights as People, Indian Court Rules
The new order encourages people to show compassion toward animals

Sharma wrote a similar order last year for the Uttarakhand High Court. The ruling saw animals living in Uttarakhand, also a state in North India, recognized as legal persons.

Like the Haryana ruling, the Uttarakhand order places residents as animal guardians. The order, which includes “the entire animal kingdom,” was created to combat the poaching trade, animal abusers, and environmental pollution.

India and Environment Protection

In 2017, Sharma was a member of the bench that declared rivers Ganga and Yamuna, and all their tributaries and streams, as living entities. The 2,525 km Ganga river and its tributaries are a vital water source for 400 million people.

It was the first time in India and the second time in the world that such recognition had taken place, however, the verdict was stayed by the Supreme Court.

Animal Welfare in India

Last year, India banned all live animal exports in a bid to improve animal welfare in the country. “Demands from the public” inspired the ban, according to Mansukh Mandaviya, the Union Minister of State for Shipping, after public protests were held in various parts of the country.

https://www.livekindly.com/animals-gran ... JMgrfwBJUE
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:29 pm

Hunter who sparked fury by killing giraffe says she ate the animal and it was 'delicious'

Tess Talley went viral in 2018, sparking fury from celebrities including comedian Ricky Gervais, with an image of her next to the dead giraffe which she shot

She has now revealed she dined on the animal and has made pillows as well as a gun case from its carcass.

Describing eating it, she told CBS: “He was delicious.

“Not only was he beautiful and majestic but he was good."

In an interview discussing her hunting, Ms Talley continued: “It's a hobby, it's something that I love to do.”

Ms Talley claimed the animal, which was in South Africa, was killed as part of a “conservation hunt” aimed at managing the wildlife in an area.

She claimed she would not just kill animals “just to be knocking them down”, insisting she aids conservation.

In 2018 images were shared by animal rights groups on Twitter and Facebook showed Ms Talley posing with the animal in a photo from 2017.

“Prayers for my once in a lifetime dream hunt came true today! Spotted this rare black giraffe bull and stalked him for quite awhile (sic),” Talley wrote in a since-deleted post on Facebook, according to USA Today.

The post said the animal was more than 18 years old, weighed 4,000 lbs and yielded 2,000 lbs of meat.

On average, giraffes have a 25-year lifespan, according to National Geographic.

At the time, actor Gervais, who often posts about animal conservation issues wrote on Twitter: “What's 16 feet tall and has a c*** on the back of its neck?”

The latest comments from her have also cause dupset, with some branding her a "gross person" and stating it was "sickening".

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/h ... 62541.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:29 am

Plant extinction bad news for all species

Almost 600 plant species have been lost from the wild in the last 250 years, according to a comprehensive new study

The number is based on actual extinctions rather than estimates, and is twice that of all bird, mammal and amphibian extinctions combined.

Scientists say plant extinction is occurring up to 500 times faster than what would be expected naturally.

In May, a UN report estimated that one million animal and plant species were threatened with extinction

Researchers say their analysis of all documented plant extinctions in the world shows what lessons can be learned to stop future extinctions.

Most people can name a mammal or bird that has become extinct in recent centuries, but few could name an extinct plant, said Dr Aelys Humphreys of Stockholm University.

"This study is the first time we have an overview of what plants have already become extinct, where they have disappeared from and how quickly this is happening," she added.
St Helena Olive Image copyright Rebecca Cairn Wicks

The lost plants include the Chile sandalwood, which was exploited for essential oils, the banded trinity plant, which spent much of its life underground, and the pink-flowered St Helena olive tree.

The biggest losses are on islands and in the tropics, which are home to highly valued timber trees and tend to be particularly rich in plant diversity.

What did the study find?

Scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and Stockholm University found that 571 plant species had disappeared in the last two and a half centuries, a number that is more than twice the number of birds, mammals and amphibians recorded as extinct (a combined total of 217 species).

The researchers believe these numbers underestimate the true levels of ongoing plant extinction.

One positive, though, was evidence that some plants once thought extinct have been rediscovered, such as the Chilean crocus.

Why does plant extinction matter?

All life on Earth depends on plants, which provide the oxygen we breathe and the food we eat.

Plant extinctions can lead to a whole cascade of extinctions in other organisms that rely on them, for instance insects that use plants for food and for laying their eggs.

Plant extinction is bad news for all species, said Dr Eimear Nic Lughadha, co-researcher and conservation scientist at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

"Millions of other species depend on plants for their survival, humans included, so knowing which plants we are losing and from where, will feed back into conservation programmes targeting other organisms as well," she explained.

What lessons can we learn?

The researchers are calling for a number of measures to stop plant extinction:

    Record all the plants across the world

    Support herbaria, which preserve plant specimens for posterity

    Support botanists who carry out vital research

    Teach our children to see and recognise local plants.
Dr Rob Salguero-Gómez, of the University of Oxford, who was not part of the study, said understanding the how, where, and why of plant loss was of paramount importance, not only for ecologists but also for human societies.

"We depend on plants directly for food, shade and construction materials, and indirectly for 'ecosystem services' such as carbon fixation, oxygen creation, and even improvement in human mental health through enjoying green spaces," he commented.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-48584515
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:04 pm

Environmentalists:
Turkish bombardments destroy ecosystem

Since 27 May, the Turkish state has massively extended its attacks against the South Kurdistan regions of Bradost and Xakurkê. Every day, gardens, vineyards and forests are bombarded by Turkish fighter jets and many animals are killed. Although the attacks have just reached a special dimension, the region has suffered from bombardments for decades. For the local people, the region becomes practically uninhabitable and they are forced into migration

According to current information, more than half of the 216 villages in the Bradost region have already been abandoned. There are 116 villages in four towns in Hajiawa region, 63 in Binarê Qandil, 123 in Zaxo and 310 in Soran.

The environmentalists complain that especially the water is poisoned and the bombing also worsens the air. Experts warn that the entire ecosystem of the region could collapse due to the bombardments. The burnt down slopes are also prone to landslides. The black smoke particles that are created by the fires caused by the bombings are dangerous for humans and the environment.

"The main reason for environmental pollution is war"

Attorney Nebil Musa explains: "The main reason for the environmental pollution here is the war. Our land is directly damaged and its historic sites are destroyed. The explosives harm the nature and living creatures. The fields of the farmers are burned down. The people must protest and build up pressure on the government. A restriction must be introduced for Turkey and Iran. If this continues, all the people will have to leave the region because of the attacks, and not a single animal will be left."

The co-chair of the Kurdistan environmental organization, Renc Eta, explains: "The bombings are causing serious damage to the environment. We have no center to investigate the explosives that remain in the region or the weapons used in the attacks. We do not know in which way the bombs harm us. The government does nothing in this regard. Specialists must investigate the damage caused by the bombing.”
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:29 am

Let's just make Sir David Attenborough Prime Minister and get on with our lives, nation suggests

David Attenborough

The British electorate has suggested a novel solution.

Growing more sick and tired of lying career politicians and outrageous media manipulation on a daily basis, the population of the United Kingdom have suggested that national treasure and trustworthy legend Sir David Attenborough be put in charge of running the country.

British voter and convenient mouthpiece Simon Williams, who started the ‘Make David Attenborough PM’ movement after awaking to find parliament once again hanging like a shire horse told reporters, “This is an incredibly straightforward solution to the absolute mess that is British politics today.

“Sir David has seen the world, knows pretty much everything there is to know about anything you need to know about, and has the best interests of the whole world, let alone the United Kingdom, at heart.

“In terms of his cabinet, I propose Stephen Fry as home secretary, Dame Judi Dench as foreign secretary and John Cleese as culture secretary. Oh, and JK Rowling as secretary of state for education.

“That will be a good starting line-up to the most successful, trustworthy and downright loveable government in history :x

“Christ, they could make any number of mistakes and no-one would care. Sir David would just explain how they were going to make things better and we’d all immediately feel better about everything.”

With the majority of the public throwing their weight behind the plan, mandatory background checks are being undertaken on the future rulers to ensure none have ever engaged in any naughtier activities than running through a field of wheat.

https://newsthump.com/2017/06/09/lets-j ... 59DMZ6__Eo
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:13 am

Triple whammy threatens climate progress

    At a meeting in Bonn, Saudi Arabia has continued to object to a key IPCC scientific report that urges drastic cuts in carbon emissions.

    Added to that, the EU has so far failed to agree to a long term net zero emissions target.

    Thirdly, a draft text from the G20 summit in Japan later this week waters down commitments to tackle warming.
One attendee in Bonn said that, taken together, the moves represented a fierce backlash from countries with strong fossil fuel interests.

There was controversy last December at the Katowice COP24 meeting in Poland, when Saudi Arabia, the US, Kuwait and Russia objected to moves to welcome the findings of the IPCC Special Report on 1.5C.

That study, regarded as a landmark, had two clear messages.

    It showed that there were huge benefits in keeping temperature rises this century to 1.5C compared to a world that warmed 2C or more.

    It also said that keeping the world below 1.5C was still possible, if drastic cuts in emissions were initiated by 2030.
To the frustration of a huge majority of countries, the objections of the four major fossil fuel producers, meant that the scientific report was not formally recognised in the negotiations.

The battle over the 1.5C report has carried over from Katowice to Bonn. Normally, this mid-year meeting is concerned with technical questions but this time the issue of the IPCC has re-emerged as a huge fault line between nations.

The Saudis are keen to highlight what are termed "knowledge gaps" in the IPCC report, that they believe hamper its ability to inform decision making at national or international level.

"We know that there are some hardliners that would try to downplay the seriousness and the actions that are required, that is their point of view," said Carlos Fuller from Belize, the lead negotiator for the Alliance of Small Island States.

"They recognise that they need to undertake major changes that they are not happy about."

Many environmental campaigners see the Saudi pressure on the IPCC as part of campaign to discredit the science.

"The report shows the importance of striving towards 1.5C, that it is still achievable, and there is an incredible urgency to act vigorously and quickly," said Dr Jeni Miller from the Global Climate and Health Alliance.

"This report was requested by the UN, by these countries themselves, so to not accept the findings of the report is a rejection of science, and if you are rejecting the science there is not a way forward to address this problem."

While delegates seek to find a way forward on the science, there is growing concern about the European Union's inability to reach consensus on cutting carbon emissions to net zero by 2050.

Despite the late support of Germany in favour of the idea, four countries including Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic and Estonia, refused to support the plan last week.

This has caused some dismay among officials at the UN

The Secretary General, António Guterres, has called a special summit on climate change to be held in New York in September with the express purpose of getting countries to increase their existing targets.

The EU's proposed net zero goal was key to making this a success.

Mr Guterres has expressed his "personal concern" about the setback. Campaigners are also worried.

"The EU are very aware of the Secretary General's summit, they are aware they are calling for a revision of targets, it would be embarrassing for the EU to go with what they just have now," said Ulriikka Aarnio, from the Climate Action Network.

"Somebody said they would be going from leader to loser if that was the case."

Do you have a question you want to ask about the planet? Try our climate change chatbot.

Contributing to the downbeat mood in Bonn is the forthcoming G20 meeting of global leaders in Osaka, Japan.

A draft of the closing communiqué mentions climate change as just one issue among many and omits to use the phrases "global warming" and "decarbonisation".

Critics believe that Japan is trying hard to win favour with the US on trade issues by downplaying the scale of the climate question and possible solutions to it.

"The story, based on a draft of the communiqué, shows Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is a weak host and his G20 climate promises are full of hot air, undermining his previous claims that he seeks to save the planet." said Kimiko Hirata, director of the Kiko Network Japan, a non-governmental organisation.

"Japan, alongside China, is the biggest financier of coal overseas in the world and the government continues to build new coal plants domestically despite our huge solar and wind power potential."

As well as Japan, other leading economies are continuing to support coal based power generation. A study released by the Overseas Development Institute says that G20 nations have almost tripled the subsidies given to coal fired plants in recent years, despite the growing need to cut emissions.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-48746137
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:38 am

The Time is Now:
Thousands descend on Westminster


Thousands of people have gathered around Westminster to call on their MPs to take urgent action on the climate and environmental "emergency"

MPs have been meeting their constituents around the Houses of Parliament and along the Thames to discuss the need to take action on cutting emissions, protecting nature and tackling plastic pollution.

The Time Is Now lobby follows growing environmental protests and increasing warnings of the need for "unprecedented action" to curb dangerous climate change.

Parliament has declared an environment and climate emergency, and the lobby comes on the day the Lords debate a target to cut greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050, which should pass into law this week.

Before MPs began to meet campaigners, religious leaders and people from different faiths marched down Whitehall on a walk of witness.

They were led by former archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams, who said he was proud the UK had begun to realise the seriousness of the situation.

"I compare it with the great struggle 200 years ago with ending the slave trade, Parliament took an option that wasn't easy, it must have felt risky at the time facing massive entrenched global culture and things changed.

"If we want to be true to the very best of ourselves in the UK, that's a story we might want to tell ourselves again," he told the Press Association.

At least 195 MPs signed in for the event and were encouraged to stick a pin in a large map of the UK to mark where their constituency was before being taken by rickshaw to speak to their constituents.

At 2pm, campaigners rang thousands of alarm clocks, mobile phone alarms and sirens, and cheered loudly, as part of a move to symbolise "the time is now" to act.

Campaigners had come dressed as pandas, Wombles and even condoms, and people were able to leave messages for politicians about protecting the natural world by making a call in a "rewilded" phone box covered in flowers.

Professor Michelle Lowe, from Winchester, said she had come to the mass lobby to speak to her MP because "the time is now".

"I have children, who are 22, 20 and 16, and I'm worried about their futures," she said.

Retired self-employed gardener Rosie Harden-Vane, from Holywell, Northumberland, said: "We've absolutely got to do something about the state of the planet, we are absolutely ruining it with pollution."

She said she wanted to urge politicians "to speed up the process of reaching net zero emissions and to not just focus on the UK but be a shining example for the rest of the world, and to do something about single use plastic".

Former climate change secretary and Liberal Democrat MP Sir Ed Davey was among the first to turn up to meet constituents and said "it's absolutely clear that the British public are saying to politicians get tough on climate".

He accused the Government of "putting the brakes on" climate action since 2015.

He said: "This is an emergency, we know what to do, they should get on and do it."

But former Tory minister Damien Green said the legislation on net zero was a "big step forward".

He added: "People are always impatient for more action, I do think the Government has been particularly proactive on this over the past few years."

Benjamin Halfpenny from Greener UK said one of the asks of MPs was a strong Environment Bill to tackle declines in wildlife such as hedgehogs, air pollution and water quality in rivers.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/the- ... 76731.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:49 am

Extinction Rebellion and Greenpeace
to march through Glastonbury


Climate change activists from Extinction Rebellion and Greenpeace UK will march through Glastonbury Festival on Thursday

Organisers say the rally will include speeches from activists and a procession through the Worthy Farm site led by Extinction Rebellion’s trademark pink boat.

On Sunday, Extinction Rebellion will also join forces with the Wisdom Keepers to hold a minute silence on the Pyramid Stage, in memory of Make Ecocide Law founder Polly Jenkins.

Extinction Rebellion also has set up a “Rebel Rebel” tent in the Green Futures field for the weekend with a program of talks on the “climate emergency”.

Thursday’s procession is set to meet at the Park Stage at 4pm, where activists such as Dr Gail Bradbrook and Rosie Rogers will speak to the crowds.

Ecuadorian shaman Kurikindi and rapper Dizraeli will also address the protesters before the march begins.

The crowds will then proceed together through the festival.

At the end of the procession, organisers have planned to invite festival goers to help create the largest ever human Extinction Symbol before Nick Mulvey performs.

Models of insects and extinct species will be carried through the procession alongside big brass bands and the Arcadia bug, the giant moving spider-like structure that has featured at the festival in previous years.

Dr Gail Bradbrook, from Extinction Rebellion, said: “The climate emergency is the most dangerous threat currently facing all life on earth."

“It is also important to acknowledge the people who have been standing up for us and for our planet for years,” she added.

“Tomorrow, we are honouring the work of indigenous activists and teaming up with Greenpeace to form a movement of movements”

Greenpeace UK’s Rosie Rogers also said: “Greenpeace has been fighting for a greener, peaceful world for nearly 50 years. But, as I look at the global climate movement today I am filled with hope.

“A hope that together, we can really face up to the challenge ahead of us in what is literally the fight of our lives."

“We know the challenge is huge but with everyone pulling in the same direction, we can win,” she said.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/glas ... 76791.html
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