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Welcome To Roj Bash Kurdistan 

Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate change

This is where you can talk about every subject (previously it was called shout room)

Re: Mass loss of wildlife caused by human consumption

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:27 pm

Piling wrote:Too many humans on earth, that's the problem. Our planet is crowded, no place for other species.


I do not know about France but the average UK family has 2 children

Many people study first and have a couple of children when we are in a position to support them

Shockingly, in some other countries, people breed like rabbits X(

Sadly, in many of those countries, the women are treated like baby making machines without lives of their own and few, if any, chances of education or betterment

As with China and it's one time law of one baby per family, people worldwide will have to limit the number
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Re: Mass loss of wildlife caused by human consumption

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Re: Mass loss of wildlife caused by human consumption

PostAuthor: Piling » Thu Nov 01, 2018 5:15 am

France has the highest natality of EU, more than 2 (because of social policy encouraging families).

But even if everybody decide to have no more than 2, starting from 8 billions, it is impossible to not reach one day 20 billions of humans on earth.
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Re: Mass loss of wildlife caused by human consumption

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Nov 01, 2018 2:53 pm

Reduce the number of fathers by cutting the penises of ALL sex offenders, ISIS members, murderers, wife beaters, rapists, child sex offenders, pimps and perverts :D

In the UK the government pays a child allowance to people for each child they have

I grew up to believe that before we have children, we should be in a position to support them

I could afford 1 child so I had 1 child and when I had more money I adopted another child

I went on to take in and house dozens of young people over the years

The most I had in my home at any one time, was 20 homeless youngsters :ymhug:

I also set up squats to house homeless young people

I was behind the first short life users groups in the UK. Groups aimed to make short term use of empty properties (a follow on from the squats)

I was behind a lodgers scheme set up to provide lodgings for young homeless people in family homes

My friend and I started what I believe to be the first every Summer Play Scheme for children

I have been involved in the running of countless youth and community groups

I believe that people should NOT have children if they are not prepared to help look after them

Instead of giving parents money to breed like rats, parents should be fined and even imprisoned for failing to look after their children properly, supporting their after hours activities and encouraging/supporting school homework

Behind every drug taking/dealing child is a parent who does not look after their child

We should go back to the early days of birth control

    Sex is for fun :ymdevil:

    Marriage is for babies :ymhug:
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Re: Mass loss of wildlife caused by human consumption

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:30 am

Five products you didn't know were harming the environment

Palau has become the first country to impose a widespread ban on sunscreen in order to protect its vulnerable coral reefs - but for many consumers this may be the first they have heard of the product's harmful effects.

Researchers believe 10 chemical ingredients found in sunscreen are highly toxic to marine life, and can make coral more susceptible to bleaching.

But sunscreen is far from the only household product having an adverse effect on the natural world.

Here are five others you may not have been aware of.

The contraceptive pill

While the contraceptive pill may result in fewer humans inhabiting the planet - reducing the strain on natural resources - a 2016 Swedish study unearthed evidence of an unusual drawback.

In her doctoral thesis at Lund University, Lina Nikoleris found the hormone ethinyl-estradiol (EE2) - a synthetic version of oestrogen found in birth control pills - was changing both the behaviour and genetics of some fish.

When released into water as waste, EE2 was changing "the genetic balance" in fish such as salmon, trout and roach - which have more oestrogen receptors than humans.

The study also found EE2 made it harder for the fish to catch food.

"Previous studies have shown that the fish also develop problems with procreation," said Ms Nikoleris.

"This can lead to the complete disappearance of an entire fish population, and consequences for entire ecosystems."

Avocados

Not only is your favourite breakfast component preventing you from getting on the housing ladder, it is also bad for the environment.

The Water Footprint Network, which campaigns for more efficient water use, calculated that it took around 272 litres of water to grow a single avocado - with a potentially devastating effect on regions where it is grown.

In 2011, an investigation by the Chilean water authority found at least 65 examples of avocado farms illegally diverting rivers and other water sources to their plantations.

That, in turn, was blamed for causing droughts, forcing local villagers to choose between drinking and washing.

Pineapples

The pineapple, which according to Tesco overtook the avocado as the fruit with the fastest-growing UK sales last year, is being grown at such a rate that it is having a detrimental impact on the environment in some parts of the world.

In Costa Rica, one of the world's largest producers, thousands of hectares of forest have been cleared to make way for pineapples.

The Costa Rican Conservationist Federation says complete forests have disappeared overnight, causing irreversible damage to the country.

Pineapples are grown in vast monocultures - the intense production of only one crop - and require a large amount of pesticides, which can also be harmful for the environment.

Shampoo

Palm oil is one of the most efficient and versatile vegetable oils on the planet - but its widespread use has led to significant deforestation.

In a 2018 report, conservation group the WWF warned the conversion of tropical forests and peat land to palm oil plantations was releasing "massive quantities of carbon dioxide, fuelling climate change, and destroying the habitat of species like orangutans".

While you may be aware of palm oil's presence in edible products such as chocolate, margarine, ice cream, bread and biscuits, fewer people know of its role in numerous household products.

In shampoo, for example, palm oil is used as a form of conditioner to help maintain your hair's natural oils, which would otherwise be stripped away by chemicals.

Palm oil is also found in products such as lipstick, washing detergents, hand soap and toothpaste.

Air fresheners

The dangerous levels of air pollution in the UK have been well publicised - but did you know that air fresheners could be part of the problem?

A 2016 report, from the Royal College of Physicians, warned that it was not just outdoor air pollution which people needed to be wary of but also poor air quality in our homes, caused by everyday household products such as air fresheners.

These often contain a chemical called limonene, which is commonly used to give a citrus smell - and is also used in food.

It is not a chemical that poses a big hazard to health on its own but once released into the air it can become a problem.

An experiment carried out by the BBC's Trust Me, I'm a Doctor show found that when limonene reacted with the ozone present in air, it produced formaldehyde.

Everyday exposure to formaldehyde may contribute to increasing incidences of asthma and other illnesses.

Links between formaldehyde and cancer were established in the 1980s, and since 2011 it's been listed as a known human carcinogen.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46070037
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Re: Mass loss of wildlife caused by human consumption

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Nov 17, 2018 6:15 pm

Extinction Rebellion protests block London bridges

Protesters blocked off five major bridges in central London as part of a so-called "rebellion day"

Organisers said thousands gathered in central London to demand the government take greater action on climate change :ymapplause:

Demonstrators occupied Southwark, Blackfriars, Waterloo, Westminster and Lambeth bridges for most of the day, after a week of action by campaign group Extinction Rebellion.

They later moved on from the crossings to a rally in Parliament Square.

Large groups of people holding banners began congregating on the five bridges from 10:00 GMT before blocking off the traffic.

Tiana Jacout, of Extinction Rebellion, said the blockages were "not a step we take lightly" but "if things continue as is, we face an extinction greater than the one that killed the dinosaurs".

"We have tried marching, and lobbying, and signing petitions. Nothing has brought about the change that is needed," she said.

According to the group, 6,000 people joined the protests and more than 70 have been arrested.

Two protesters on Westminster Bridge, who did not want to be named, told the Press Association they "truthfully believe we're all heading for extinction".

"Climate change is so important, it's coming over so fast and nothing is being done," the women said.

It is believed about 50 people have been arrested for taking part in action over the past week.

The Met said the protests had caused "significant traffic disruption" and "hampered" emergency service vehicles from getting across London.

On Wednesday, protesters glued themselves to the gates of Downing Street.

At the start of the week, activists blockaded the UK's energy department by chaining themselves together on the pavement.

Is the protest fair?
By Roger Harrabin, BBC environment analyst

The UK is in the leading pack of nations in cutting the CO2 emissions that are over-heating the planet.

The Climate Change Act locks Britain into reducing greenhouse gases by 80% by 2050, based on 1990 levels.

And the government has kept pace with the step-by-step targets so far, mostly by stopping coal-burning for electricity.

It promises to meet future targets too - although its advisers warn it has to improve by getting more electric cars on the road, and making homes and businesses more energy efficient.

The protesters say the targets will be breached if the government spends £30bn on new roads, encourages fracking and looks to expand aviation even further.

Climate change demands a seismic shift in society, they say. And they’re not seeing that yet.

Link to Article - Photos:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-46247339
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Re: Climate change: What could be wiped out by temperature r

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Nov 17, 2018 6:29 pm

Climate change: What could be wiped out by temperature rise

Scientists have described the serious concept of "Hothouse Earth".

An international team of researchers suggest that global warming will have severe consequences for the planet.

They paint a picture of boiling hot climates and towering seas in years to come if temperatures rise by just 2C.

That means it could turn some of the planet's natural forces - that currently protect us - into our enemies.

Dr Sarah Cornell is an environmental scientist and one of the researchers behind the report for the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

She's described some of the big changes which could happen with a 2C temperature rise - which is the globally accepted amount, according to the Paris climate agreement.

Chocolate is under threat :shock: X(

This is something that is very close to Dr Cornell's (and everyone else's) heart.

"Chocolate is just one example of a globally important crop that grows in warm and humid climates," she says.

But global warming doesn't mean that there will be more places to grow cacao beans - in fact, it's the opposite.

A rise in global temperatures causes weather systems to be unpredictable and inconsistent, which would put cacao growing at risk.

"It is about the really intricate pattern of temperature, water flow, light intensity, the nutrients already available in the soil," says Dr Cornell.

The Arctic could melt

Ice in the areas around the North Pole could melt completely, says Dr Cornell

But it's not just the animals living there which are under threat.

"When you melt the Arctic, you're changing the way that the whole Earth works," she says.

"You're changing ice that reflects heat back into space into dark seawater that absorbs incoming solar radiation."

So it's a vicious circle - the less ice there is to reflect heat away from the Earth, the more global warming accelerates.

Entire nations might have to move

How can you be a country if you don't have any land?

Melting ice means rising sea levels - which could put low-lying island nations, such as the Maldives, under the sea.

"It will have all kinds of social consequences because the people who live in these low-lying areas will have to go somewhere," says Dr Cornell.

"There are already lots of discussions with people in low-lying Pacific islands talking with Australia and New Zealand about where they can live, and how they can have nationhood while renting land from another country."

Unpredictable rain

Combine rising temperatures with other human activity such as deforestation, and you have drastic effects on the water cycle.

"When you change landscapes, you change where water can flow," says Dr Cornell.

"When you warm the planet and are simultaneously changing the landscape, you're changing the water cycle... in a much less predictable way than it was before."

Extreme changes to the water cycle can lead to severe floods - and severe droughts.

How a tree frog affects a whole ecosystem

Two years ago, a little brown treefrog called Toughie died in Atlanta, USA, at the age of 12.

He was the last known living Rabbs' fringe-limbed treefrog to exist.

Toughie's story is a symbol of the rate of extinction that is being caused as a result of climate change.

The extinction of a species even as small as a frog has consequences which we don't yet fully understand.

"We could lose treefrogs, and that doesn't sound important but it's vitally important because it's what we lose with it," says Dr Cornell.

"When we're killing species, we probably won't know in advance what the consequences are.

"But we already know that we're making ecosystems much more vulnerable".

Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45096740
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Re: Climate change: What could be wiped out by temperature r

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 18, 2018 2:14 am

Watch The Iceland Christmas Ad Which Will
Never Be Shown After Authorities Banned It


Supermarket Iceland's advert for Christmas has been banned for being too political

https://youtu.be/JdpspllWI2o

The commercial, made with Greenpeace, features an animated orangutan and highlights the destruction of the rainforest by palm oil growers :((

The advertising clearance body, Clearcast, who screen broadcast adverts, deemed that the film breaks rules banning political advertising laid down by the 2003 Communications Act.

Earlier this year, Iceland became the first major UK supermarket to announce they are removing palm oil from all its own-brand products :ymapplause:

Iceland's founder Malcolm Walker said: "This was a film that Greenpeace made with a voice over by Emma Thompson.

"We got permission to use it and take off the Greenpeace logo and use it as the Iceland Christmas ad. It would have blown the John Lewis ad out of the window. It was so emotional."

The watchdog said in a statement: "Clearcast and the broadcasters have to date been unable to clear this Iceland ad because we concerned that it doesn’t comply with the political rules of the BCAP code.

"The creative submitted to us is linked to another organisation who have not yet been able to demonstrate compliance in this area."

More than 890,000 people have since signed a petition calling for the advert to be shown on TV.

https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/watch-icelan ... ad-banned/
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Re: Climate change: What could be wiped out by temperature r

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 18, 2018 2:27 am

Iceland Advert: Which Products Contain Palm Oil And How Can You Avoid It?

You won’t see Iceland’s Christmas advert highlighting the impact of palm oil production on TV this year because it’s been banned for being “too political”

The supermarket teamed up with Greenpeace to create an animation which tells the story of an orangutan whose home had been destroyed by palm oil producers.

But, Clearcast, who decides which adverts are and aren’t allowed in the UK, ruled it “contravenes the prohibition on political advertising”. The decision sparked hundreds of thousands of people to watch and share the advert on social media.

Earlier this year Iceland became the first major supermarket in the UK to ban products using palm oil because of environmental issues.

What is palm oil?

Palm oil is a type of vegetable oil which is made from the fruits of trees known as African oil palms.

Such trees are mainly grown in plantations in Indonesia and Malaysia.

The oil is naturally high in saturated vegetable fats.

It can be found in half of all supermarket products, including processed food, toiletries and cosmetics.

Why is palm oil bad for the environment?

Palm oil production is believed to have been responsible for around 8 per cent of the world’s deforestation between 1990 and 2008.

It’s down to a huge surge in demand for the product because of its apparent health benefits and lower production costs.

Forests are usually burned to clear areas where people can grow oil palms - and sometimes this happens illegally.

It’s seen large areas of forest in south-east Asia and Africa destroyed, with 100,000 orangutans lost between 1999 and 2015.

Other animals like rhinos and tigers as well as indigenous people have also had their homes destroyed because of palm oil production.

Which products contain palm oil?

Palm oil can be found in half of all packaged supermarket products. This includes:

    - Lipstick

    - Pizza dough

    - Instant noodles

    - Shampoo

    - Ice cream

    - Detergent

    - Margarine

    - Chocolate

    - Cookies

    - Biodiesel

    - Soap

    - Packaged bread
How can you tell whether a product contains palm oil?

Some products that use palm oil aren’t always clearly labelled. It can appear under a number of names, including:

INGREDIENTS: Vegetable Oil, Vegetable Fat, Palm Kernel, Palm Kernel Oil, Palm Fruit Oil, Palmate, Palmitate, Palmolein, Glyceryl, Stearate, Stearic Acid, Elaeis Guineensis, Palmitic Acid, Palm Stearine, Palmitoyl Oxostearamide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-3, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Sodium Kernelate, Sodium Palm Kernelate, Sodium Lauryl Lactylate/Sulphate, Hyrated Palm Glycerides, Etyl Palmitate, Octyl Palmitate, Palmityl Alcohol

CONTAINS: Palm oil

Many companies hide palm oil in the ingredients by writing vegetable oil, but more often than not, it is a mixture of oils that contains palm.

Buying Products With Sustainable Palm Oil

The RSPO provide companies with a symbol if the palm oil they use is from sustainable sources.

To be stamped with the RSPO Trademark, they have to prove that no forests or areas that contain significant concentrations of endangered species or fragile ecosystems can be cleared.

1021

Look out for this mark on all the products above.

https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/the-news-exp ... -palm-oil/
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Re: VERY sad advert on environmental issues banned

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 18, 2018 2:39 am

Please watch the video and share it

https://youtu.be/JdpspllWI2o
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Re: VERY sad advert on environmental issues banned

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:54 am

Orphaned baby rhino rescued near dead bodies of poached animals

Orphaned baby rhino called 'David' is saved from South African wilderness after he's found alone near his dead parents' whose tusks were sawn off

    Baby rhino rescued from poachers in South Africa by emergency charity team

    'David' found near dead bodies of mother and other killed endangered rhinos

    Rhino saved from slaughter and taken to safety to be looked after by orphanage

    Team in area to trim horns to deter poachers by many had already been killed
An orphaned baby rhino was rescued after both his parents were killed by poachers in South Africa.

The baby rhinoceros, nicknamed David by his rescuers, was found not far from the dead bodies of many of the endangered animals.

A team of conservationists were in the area to trim the horns of rhinos to deter poachers from killing them for their tusks, but the poachers got to them first and already slaughtered the huge beasts.

Several carcasses of recently killed rhinos were found, including a dead female, whose vulnerable orphaned calf was found nearby.

The Rhino 911 team - a rapid response helicopter unit that flies in to help wounded rhinos - loaded him into a truck and took him to safety.

When the Rhino 911 team arrived in South Africa to trim rhino horns they discovered poachers had already killed many of the endangered species

Baby rhino David was found near his slaughtered mother by the rescue team and taken to safety at at orphanage

David was small enough to fit into the back of a Toyota Landcruiser, so he could be taken to a nearby vets and then to The Rhino Orphanage in Limpopo Province, South Africa

The orphaned animal was given medical attention by vets before being taken to a rhino orphanage in South Africa

He was small enough to fit into the back of a Toyota Landcruiser, so he could be taken to a nearby vets and taken to be looked after by The Rhino Orphanage in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

Rescuers named him 'David' in honour of the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, which funds Rhino 911's work.

In just a decade more than 7,000 African rhinos have been killed by poachers to feed the demand in Asian markets for rhino horn, which is wrongly thought to have ancient medicinal properties, the charity says.

From 2007 to 2014, South Africa saw a growth of over 9,000 per cent in rhino poaching.

Black market rhino horns is valued at around £2,330 ($3,000), meaning a whole horn could fetch poachers up to £15,000.

It is thought that if poaching continues at this level, the species could be hunted to extinction.

Georgina Lamb, who is charity founder David Shepherd's granddaughter, was travelling with the Rhino 911 rapid response helicopter and said many of the team were in tears when David was found

Rhino calf David was found not far from the dead bodies of many of the endangered animals, including his mother

Georgina Lamb, who is David Shepherd's granddaughter, was travelling with the Rhino 911 rapid response helicopter when the tragic death toll was discovered.

She was accompanied by her sister, the artist Emily Lamb and DSWF Wildlife Ranger Ambassador, Jacques Rudolph, who lives in South Africa.

Georgina, who is DSWF's head of programmes and policy, described how many of the team were in tears when David was found.

She said: 'This is possibly one of the most heart-breaking days I have ever experienced.

'We're so sad to have to share such horrible news with our supporters, but this really does show why our work is so important.

Rhino 911 is a rapid response helicopter unit, flying in to help wounded or orphaned rhinos with the aid of vets to treat the animals

The team found carcasses of dead rhinos around the area when they landed to trim their horns to deter poachers from hunting them

Many of the rescue team were moved to tears by the sight of so many dead rhinos in South Africa

'When the orphan rhino was named David as thanks for our support, we were all in tears.'

Rhino 911 is a rapid response helicopter unit, flying in to help wounded or orphaned rhinos with the aid of vets.

During their trip the team also successfully trimmed the horn from an adult rhino, reducing the risk of it being killed in the future by poachers.

Rhino 911 pilot and co-founder, Nico Jacobs, said: 'If we hadn't been here, this little baby rhino would have dehydrated and died.

'This is the problem we're facing in South Africa every week – it's terribly sad that the people can't unite to save these amazing animals.'

The David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation funds projects across Africa and Asia that are working to save the rhino.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... imals.html
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Re: VERY sad advert on environmental issues banned

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 18, 2018 6:35 pm

One woman's fight to save rainforest

There is only one place in the world where orangutan, rhinos, elephants and tigers still co-exist in the wild

Environmental activist Farwiza Farhan is fighting to protect this last wilderness, Sumatra's Leuser Ecosystem.

In 2012, her NGO, Yayasan HAkA, sued an oil palm company that had cleared forest under an illegally issued permit.

She says she is driven by a sense of injustice that no-one is speaking up for the wildlife.

On the pristine tropical rainforest…

"Imagine standing under a very large canopy and you look up - you can hear hornbill whizzing past. And then you look around and you hear the sound of gibbons echoing through the forest, calling out their territories.

"You see the orangutan - the mother and baby swinging from tree to tree - and amongst all this different wildlife you see all these different macaques screaming at you. But then from moment to moment, you get silence when you hardly hear anything, before the echo of the forest comes back to life.

"In the distance sometimes you can hear the sound of chain saws, you can hear the sound of destruction coming in closer. You know that there's something you can do to prevent that from happening. You know there's something you can do to stop the chainsaw from going deeper into the forest.

On falling in love with nature….

"I became a conservationist initially because I watched too many BBC Blue Planet [programmes]. I fell in love with the ocean, with the coral reef, when I was quite young and I set in my heart that this was what I was going to do for the rest of my life.

"Then, when I actually graduated as a marine biologist, I came back to the same patch of reef where I fell in love with the ocean the first time, to see it completely destroyed - all because of climate change - and that really made me angry.

"So, in my naïve mind back then, I thought, maybe I'll try to protect forests. Maybe it's a bit easier, maybe I just need to put a fence around it and it'll be fine. And of course I was proven wrong time and time again.

On threats to the ecosystem….

"The main threat to the Leuser Ecosystem has been pressure for exploitation and unsustainable development. Big companies that want to grow palm oil - one of the most profitable crops in the world - threaten to decimate this very fragile ecosystem.

"When it comes to palm oil it's quite a complex issue. It's very difficult to narrow it down to say, 'Don't buy palm oil, or only buy sustainable ones' or 'boycott everything altogether'. The way we see palm oil - it's just a crop that is so profitable, and the problem is how the demand has driven the expansion.

Palm oil: pros and cons?

"The main problem with palm oil is its governance - how consumers in the developed world could push for a true conflict-free palm oil in their mode of consumption. Because we often look for short cuts. We want a sustainable product, but we are not willing to pay for it.

On what consumers can do…

"We live in the age of information overload. In the past, I would say read more or find out more. Now I would encourage people to pledge to see more or experience more of places that are going extinct.

"Places like Sumatra, the Amazon, Madagascar. Those are the places that are under tremendous threat from exploitation, including palm oil. If you come to the place and see how it is now and you hear about that place in the future, you would have a stronger connection to know what to do when it comes to palm oil and deforestation."

Farwiza Farhan won a Whitley Award project in 2016 for her work.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46227763
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Re: VERY sad advert on environmental issues banned

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Nov 21, 2018 6:42 pm

David Attenborough takes people's
seat at climate change talks


Sir David Attenborough has said that a failure to tackle climate change will be a catastrophe for the planet

The naturalist and broadcaster made the comments in an interview with BBC News as he took on a new UN role.

He will take up the UN's "people's seat" at the opening of crucial climate change talks in December in Poland.

It is a platform from which he will give a speech made up of submitted climate change comments from the public for world leaders.

"The people's seat is meant to represent the hundreds of millions of people are around the world whose lives are about to be affected by climate change," Sir David told BBC News.

"It will sit there to remind politicians who are working at [this] conference - and administrators and governments - that this is not a theoretical enterprise - they aren't working in a vacuum. They are dealing with real people's futures."

Sir David will take up the seat in his role giving the people's address for the opening sessions of the conference.

He is launching the campaign with a video inviting viewers to share their thoughts on climate change. Ahead of the conference, people will be invited to submit their experiences and opinions on climate change to an online poll and conversations on social media, using the hashtag #TakeYourSeat

Any comments submitted after that address, the UN says, will become part of the meeting "showing the power of the voice of the people".

But while the seat may remind politicians around the table of what is at stake, it will still be up to those around the table to decide what actions are taken.

Sir David, though, told he BBC that including voices from people experiencing the reality of climate change was vital: "There are fishermen all round the world who know what changes are taking place," he said.

"There are people whose houses have been destroyed by increasingly extreme weather. Summarising what is taking place is an almost impossible job, but it's something that has to be done."

He added: "People know that the world is changing; they are behind politicians taking action."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46266348
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Re: VERY sad advert on environmental issues banned

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Nov 26, 2018 10:09 pm

Trump on climate change report: 'I don't believe it'

US President Donald Trump has cast doubt on a report by his own government warning of devastating effects from climate change

Asked outside the White House about the findings that unchecked global warming would wreak havoc on the US economy, he said: "I don't believe it."

The report found that climate change will cost the US hundreds of billions of dollars and damage human health.

The Trump administration has pursued a pro-fossil fuels agenda.

The world's leading scientists agree that climate change is human-induced and warn that natural fluctuations in temperature are being exacerbated by human activity.

What did President Trump say?

He told reporters on Monday that he had "read some of" Friday's report, which was compiled with help from US government agencies and departments.

Mr Trump said other countries must take measures to cut their emissions.

"You're going to have to have China and Japan and all of Asia and all these other countries, you know, it [the report] addresses our country," he said.

"Right now we're at the cleanest we've ever been and that's very important to me.

"But if we're clean, but every other place on Earth is dirty, that's not so good.

"So I want clean air, I want clean water, very important."

Former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton accused the Trump administration of trying to hide the report.

What did the report say?

The Fourth National Climate Assessment outlines the potential impacts of climate change across every sector of American society.

"With continued growth in emissions at historic rates, annual losses in some economic sectors are projected to reach hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century - more than the current gross domestic product (GDP) of many US states," the report says.

"Without substantial and sustained global mitigation and regional adaptation efforts, climate change is expected to cause growing losses to American infrastructure and property and impede the rate of economic growth over this century."

The report notes that the effects of climate change are already being felt in communities across the country, including more frequent and intense extreme weather and climate-related events.

But it says that projections of future catastrophe could change if society works to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and "to adapt to the changes that will occur".

What has President Trump previously said on climate change?

In October, President Trump accused climate change scientists of having a "political agenda", telling Fox News he was unconvinced that humans were responsible for the earth's rising temperatures.

After taking office he announced the US would withdraw from the Paris climate change agreement, which commits another 187 other countries to keeping rising global temperatures "well below" 2C above pre-industrial levels.

At the time, Mr Trump said he wanted to negotiate a new "fair" deal that would not disadvantage US businesses and workers.

During his election campaign in 2016 Mr Trump said climate change was "a hoax". However he has since rowed back on that statement saying in a recent interview: "I don't think it's a hoax, I think there's probably a difference."

How great is the climate threat?

A report released in October by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) - the leading international body evaluating climate change - said it could be stopped only if the world made major, and costly, changes.

That means reducing global emissions of CO2 by 45% from 2010 levels by 2030, and reducing coal use to almost zero and using up to seven million sq km (2.7 million square miles) for land energy crops.

If the world fails to act, the researchers warned, there would be some significant and dangerous changes to our world, including rising sea levels, significant impacts on ocean temperatures and acidity, and the ability to grow crops such as rice, maize and wheat.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-46351940
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Re: Trump on climate change report: 'I don't believe it'

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:56 pm

Court Forces University of Arizona to Release
Climate Scientists’ Traditionally Confidential Emails


Science has suffered an unfortunate loss in a legal battle in Arizona, where the courts have ordered the public release of 13 years of email correspondence of two climate scientists who worked at the University of Arizona, Jonathan Overpeck and Malcolm Hughes. The plaintiff was a coal industry-funded group called Energy & Environment Legal Institute (E&E Legal). The group is led by David Schnare, who has made a career of suing and harassing climate scientists by abusing the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and state open record laws to demand masses of scientists’ emails.

E&E’s victory was obtained via State of Arizona open records laws. These laws, which allow taxpayers to request copies of government records, have been misused by anti-science groups to target scientific research. In response to this abuse by both conservative and liberal groups that have economic, political, or ideological reasons for seeking to suppress particular types of scientific inquiry, most states where the issue has arisen have sought to make it clear by statute, regulation, or judicial decision that their public records or freedom of information laws do not destroy traditional areas of confidentiality that protect the scientific endeavor. Unfortunately, not all states have enacted such reforms.

The emails provide an opportunity for hostile groups to take phrases, including scientific jargon, out of context in order to mislead and confuse the public, and divert time, energy, and resources of the scientists involved away from science. A classic example of this occurred in 2009, with the public release of stolen climate scientists’ emails from the UK: the so-called “Climategate” incident. In an attempt to mislead the public regarding the existence and severity of the climate change problem, climate science deniers published misleading excerpts from the stolen materials to attack the integrity of the scientists who had published seminal studies demonstrating the high probability of human-caused climate change. Numerous investigations found no merit in the criticisms, and no evidence of any wrongdoing by the scientists whose emails had been exposed and distorted.

In the current University of Arizona case, Malcolm Hughes' emails were released on November 30, and Jonathan Overpeck will have his emails released on January 15. Dr. Hughes testified it took him ten weeks to go through all the emails to respond to the court order, and he lost an entire research summer to reviewing old emails as well as losing a grant that expired. Dr. Overpeck testified it took him six weeks to go through everything and he was unable to use his sabbatical. Climate scientist Dr. Michael Mann, whose email correspondence to the Arizona scientists involved has now been released to E&E Legal, posted all of his emails involved online on Friday, complete with commentary explaining their content.

Enter the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund

This latest release of climate scientists’ emails, combined with the actions of the Trump Administration to sideline climate scientists and prevent them from doing their important work, underscores the urgent need for legal protection of climate scientists to continue their critical research in the face of threats like this. The nonprofit Climate Science Legal Defense Fund (CSLDF) was created seven years ago to help climate scientists fight back against politically-motivated and industry-funded harassment, and has been heavily involved in the Arizona open records case. CSLDF provides support and resources to the scientific community by offering free legal aid to scientists who are harassed, threatened or attacked for doing their jobs; educating researchers about their legal rights and responsibilities; sharing strategies and information about cases with attorneys; and publicizing attacks on science.

I'm proud to say that I'm a founding board member of the charity, which has helped over one hundred and fifty researchers since 2011. This past year, we've advised and defended scientists on issues ranging from defamation to death threats, and produced a number of educational resources to help researchers understand their legal rights. Check out our website at csldf.org, and please consider making a tax-deductible donation to this worthy cause. An anonymous donor is currently matching all gifts to CSLDF up to a total of $20,000, so when you make a gift between now and the end of the year, your gift will be doubled.

CSLDF at the AGU Meeting in Washington D.C., December 10 – 14

CSLDF will have a significant presence at the AGU Fall Meeting in D.C., including a booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth 1047) where scientists can pick up copies of CSLDF's educational materials and sign-up for updates on its work.

CSLDF will also offer free and confidential one-on-one consultations with attorneys for any scientist attending the conference. To schedule a consultation, please e-mail lawyer@csldf.org. Consultations will be held December 10-13 from 8:00 a.m-3:30 p.m. in the Marriott Marquis: Anacostia Room.

In addition, the organization will host two sessions on legal issues pertaining to scientists:

How to Get Involved in the Rulemaking Process on Tuesday, December 11 from 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Science in Court: Becoming an Expert Witness and Climate Litigation on Thursday, December 13, from 12:30-1:30 p.m.

Both sessions will be held in Room 208A/B at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. More information about these sessions is available online here.

Links

Dr. Michael Mann’s November 30 on-line release of his emails, along with a more detailed explanation of the legal case, is here.
Desmogblog took a detailed look at David Schnare and E&E Legal in a November 27 piece.
My 2009 blog post, The Manufactured Doubt industry and the hacked email controversy.
My fellow CSLDF board member, Naomi Oreskes, has co-authored an excellent book on the industry-funded attacks on science, Merchants of Doubt, which has also been made into a fascinating documentary (available on Netflix.)

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Re: Court Forces Climate Scientists to release emails

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:16 pm

Sir David Attenborough: Climate change our greatest threat

The naturalist Sir David Attenborough has said climate change is humanity's greatest threat in thousands of years.

The broadcaster said it could lead to the collapse of civilisations and the extinction of "much of the natural world".

He was speaking at the opening ceremony of United Nations-sponsored climate talks in Katowice, Poland.

The meeting is the most critical on climate change since the 2015 Paris agreement.

Sir David said: "Right now, we are facing a man-made disaster of global scale. Our greatest threat in thousands of years. Climate change.

"If we don't take action, the collapse of our civilisations and the extinction of much of the natural world is on the horizon."

The naturalist is taking up the "People's Seat" at the conference, called COP24. He is supposed to act as a link between the public and policy-makers at the meeting.

"The world's people have spoken. Their message is clear. Time is running out. They want you, the decision-makers, to act now," he said.

Speaking at the opening ceremony, Antonio Guterres, UN Secretary-General, said climate change was already "a matter of life and death" for many countries.

He explained that the world is "nowhere near where it needs to be" on the transition to a low-carbon economy.

But the UN Secretary-General said the conference was an effort to "right the ship" and he would convene a climate summit next year to discuss next steps.

Meanwhile, the World Bank has announced $200bn in funding over five years to support countries taking action against climate change.

This Conference of the Parties (COP) is the first to be held since the landmark Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on limiting global temperature rise to 1.5C came out in October.

The IPCC stated that to keep to the 1.5C goal, governments would have to slash emissions of greenhouse gases by 45% by 2030.

But a recent study showed that CO2 emissions are on the rise again after stalling for four years.

In an unprecedented move, four former UN climate talks presidents issued a statement on Sunday, calling for urgent action.

They say "decisive action in the next two years will be crucial".
Media captionClimate change: How 1.5C could change the world

Meanwhile, the gap between what countries say they are doing and what needs to be done has never been wider.

So urgent is the task that some negotiators began their meetings on Sunday, a day before the official start.
Will global leaders be attending?

Yes, some 29 heads of state and government are due to give statements at the opening of the meeting.

The number is way down on the stellar cast that turned up in Paris in 2015, which perhaps indicates that many are seeing this as more a technical stage on the road to tackling climate change than a big bang moment.

But for the likes of China and the EU, the meeting is critical. They will want to show that international co-operation can still work even in the age of President Trump.

So will cutting carbon be the main focus of the meeting?

Rather than spending all their time working on how to increase ambitions to cut carbon, conference delegates are likely to focus on trying to finalise the technical rules of how the Paris agreement will work.

While the agreement was ratified in record time by more than 180 countries in 2016, it doesn't become operational until 2020.

Before then, delegates must sort out common rules on measuring, reporting and verifying (checking to avoid the misreporting of) greenhouse gas emissions, and on how climate finance is going to be provided.

"The rulebook is the thing that will absorb most of the negotiators' capacity at this year's COP," said Camilla Born, from the climate change think tank, E3G.

Link to Full Article:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46398057
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