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Dead whale had 40kg of plastic bags in its stomach

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Re: 15 MARCH KIDS WORLDWIDE IN YOUTH CLIMATE STRIKE

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:52 am

Is Chernobyl STILL killing us?

At a checkpoint on the border between the U.S. and Canada in 2017, American homeland security agents stopped an articulated lorry for a routine check

Running a Geiger counter over its trailer, they were alarmed to discover a ‘radiating mass’ was pulsing inside. This could be the border patrol’s worst nightmare: a ‘dirty’ nuclear terrorist bomb

But when they inspected the contents, all they found was fruit. The radiation came from a crateload of blueberries, picked in Ukraine.

Since official U.S. government thresholds for permissible radiation in fruit are surprisingly high, the cargo was deemed safe and the lorry was waved on its way. But some of the blueberries were in fact way above official levels and therefore not safe at all


To understand why is to discover that 70 years of atomic tests and nuclear accidents have flooded markets around the world with toxic food.

Kate Brown’s painstaking investigation into the Chernobyl disaster and its aftermath might be the most plausible conspiracy theory you’ll ever read.

Manual For Survival argues that presidents, military chiefs, government mandarins and official scientists have all failed to face a basic truth for decades: nuclear radiation is really poisonous.

That ought to be obvious to anyone, but, rather than deal with the facts, those in charge have buried their heads in the sand and refused to take any responsibility.

The pretence began with Hiroshima, and the first of two atomic bombs dropped on Japan at the end of World War II.

Concerned that nuclear radiation would be condemned as a type of chemical warfare, and thus morally repugnant, American General Leslie Groves, head of the Manhattan Project, which developed the atomic bomb, told journalists that it was simply a very powerful conventional weapon which inflicted serious burns over a wide area.

Even American army medics were fed this lie. They were baffled that U.S. troops doing reconstruction work in Japan’s devastated cities continued to suffer unexplained burns — symptoms, we now know, of radiation poisoning.

The explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant near the city of Pripyat, in Ukraine, on April 26, 1986, was the worst atomic disaster in human history, equivalent to four Hiroshimas.

Kate spent four years conducting research on the nuclear power plant explosion which took place in Ukraine during 1986.

The book describes it vividly — ‘the thick concrete walls wobbled’ . . . ‘the blast tossed up a concrete lid the size of a cruise ship’ . . . ‘plant worker Sasha Yuvchenko watched a blue stream of ionising radiation careening towards the heavens’.

According to official Soviet figures at the time, the death toll was 54 — a gross underestimate — made up of mostly firemen and soldiers who sacrificed their lives to get the blaze under control.

Brown reveals that Soviet doctors advised workers on nuclear clean-up duty at Chernobyl to drink vodka throughout the day. It stimulated the liver to cleanse the body of radiation, they said.

Her research, conducted over four years and drawing on 27 archives in Europe, the U.S. and the former Soviet Union, estimates the actual death toll at up to 150,000 in Ukraine alone over the past 30 years.

Even today, the Russian government does not acknowledge this, and there have been no official investigations.

Many were children. Thyroid cancer in young people was rife after Chernobyl, a medical fact that even the Politburo in Moscow could not fully explain away (though the official version was that fewer than 100 children were affected and they were easily cured).

Kate speculates that radiation poisoning from nuclear leaks and explosions could be responsible for the rising incidence of cancers and auto-immune diseases (pictured: Pripyat)

Very high levels of radioactive iodine were among the toxins released in the blast. The human body craves iodine, which is absorbed through the thyroid gland; children process it especially quickly if their levels are low.

So, one simple remedy, effective if not failsafe, would have been for the government to issue safe iodine supplements to everyone at risk. This wasn’t done, partly because almost no one in the Soviet Union, from the Kremlin down to the local hospitals, had any idea how to deal with radiation poisoning.

After all, its effects had always been downplayed, ever since Hiroshima.

And they still are downplayed. When the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit by a tsunami in 2011, causing a meltdown in three reactors, the Japanese response was as inadequate as the Soviet government’s 25 years earlier. Safe iodine, for example, was not distributed.

The leaves that fell in Ukraine’s capital Kiev in autumn 1986 ought to have been treated as hazardous nuclear waste and buried.

The soil had absorbed so much radiation that a government pamphlet suggested, in a low-key way, that mushrooms should not be eaten.

MANUAL FOR SURVIVAL: A CHERNOBYL GUIDE TO THE FUTURE by Kate Brown (Allen Lane £20, 432 pp)

The meat from cattle, sheep and pigs fed on local vegetable produce was also dangerously radioactive. But rather than waste so much food, the Soviet ministry decided to send it off across the USSR, so that every citizen shared in the tribulations of Chernobyl by consuming a small, ‘safe’ amount of irradiated meat. That’s Communism in action.

It might seem so callous as to be unthinkable. But Brown warns that the same thing still happens with much food that reaches the West. After Chernobyl, radiation spread on the wind. It was quickly detected as far away as Sweden. And it lingered.

Today, much agricultural land in Ukraine and beyond is still affected. And so is the produce. But why waste it? If a batch of fruit is ‘hot’, it can be mixed with other fruit until the overall radiation reading is within so-called safe limits. That’s how a consignment of blueberries could be mistaken for a dirty bomb.

The author speculates that radiation poisoning, not only from Chernobyl but from numerous other nuclear leaks and many hundreds of atomic explosions, may be responsible for the rising incidence of cancers and auto-immune diseases.

‘Few people on earth have escaped those exposures,’ she concludes.

This book doesn’t have all the answers. It does, however, ask the right questions.

The biggest of all is: why does no one want to face the lessons of Chernobyl?

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/books/ ... ng-us.html
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Re: 15 MARCH KIDS WORLDWIDE IN YOUTH CLIMATE STRIKE

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Re: 15 MARCH KIDS WORLDWIDE IN YOUTH CLIMATE STRIKE

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Mar 17, 2019 1:21 am

Why should we study if there's no future?
Whanganui students strike against climate inaction


The "entitled" younger generation is entitled to a future, school climate strike organiser Ali Gammeter says

That has to be a real future, and not a stuggle amid the effects of catastrophic climate change. She was pleasantly surprised by the enthusiasm of about 150 people who turned up for the strike at Whanganui's Virginia Lake Punchbowl on March 15.

Most who responded to the event on Facebook were adult. She feared they might outnumber the younger generation - but there were young people from all Whanganui's secondary schools, and a few from primary and intermediate schools too.

Why should we study for a future that we don't actually have or that will be a constant, miserable struggle?

Whanganui schools have been good about the strike, Gammeter said. Whanganui Girls' College and Whanganui High School students will not be marked absent if they have contacted the school and said they were striking.

Those at the punchbowl gathered in groups, with placards and banners. It was hot, and speeches were punctuated by the squawks of cockatoo from the aviary.

Whanganui Mayor Hamish McDouall was there, with his children. He was inspired by 16-year-old Swedish girl Greta Thunberg, who started a global school strike for climate.

"Individual action has effect, and collective action has even greater effect," he said.

He said the way the ozone hole has stopped growing, as a result of global action to limit CFC emissions, was an example.

In her own speech, Gammeter said she first heard about global warming eight years ago, and thought world leaders would fix it.

Instead it was "us all around the world with our underdeveloped frontal lobes actually thinking about the future".

Some have said the students just wanted a day off school

"Why should we study for a future that we don't actually have or that will be a constant, miserable struggle?" was her reply.

She would like to see a research-based long-term transition plan, with reforestation and renewable energy, and goals and deadlines.

Green Party member Nicola Patrick added to the wish list: solar panels, no coal burned to provide electricity and freight travelling on trains, not trucks.

Teenager Messina Su'a was disappointed with the turnout, and said the schools should have publicised the strike.

"We had to go out of our way to find out about this and get involved."

Fellow Whanganui High School student Kahu Miller said climate change was something he worried about in the night.

"I feel like climate change is an issue that's going to affect not only us but future generations and we need to do something about it. It's worth sacrificing school time to come to voice our opinion."

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/coal/news/ar ... d=12212981
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Re: 15 MARCH KIDS WORLDWIDE IN YOUTH CLIMATE STRIKE

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:05 am

Hundreds of thousands
join world youth climate demo


Please click to enlarge
1111

Hundreds of thousands of young people skipped school across the globe on Friday to march through the streets for an international day of student protests aimed at pushing world leaders into action on climate change

Classrooms in capitals from Bangkok to Berlin and Lagos to London emptied as organisers of the student strike called demonstrations in more than 100 countries.

Students flooded into the streets across Europe, North and South America, and Asia carrying placards reading: "There is no planet B", "You're destroying our future" and "If you don't act like adults, we will."

Despite three decades of warnings, carbon dioxide emissions hit record levels in 2017 and again last year.

Loading the atmosphere with greenhouse gases at current rates will eventually lead to an uninhabitable planet, scientists say.

In Stockholm, Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg - who inspired the protests - warned that time was running out.

"We are living through an existential crisis that has been ignored for decades and if we do not act now it may be too late," the 16-year-old, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, told Swedish public television station SVT.

Across the world, their placards formed a mosaic:

    "Like the ocean, we will rise" (Sydney)

    "Our future in your hands" (Berlin)

    "System Change not Climate Change" (Vienna)

    "Don't be a Trump" (Hong Kong)

    "The Titanic would have NO problem in 2019" (Elmshorn, Germany)

    And everywhere, "There is no planet B."

Montreal drew among the largest crowds, estimated by organisers at nearly 150 000.

In the United States, protests were more low-key, with events held in New York, Washington, Chicago, Portland, Oregon, and St. Paul, Minnesota, where one sign read: "So bad even introverts are here!"

Further south in Latin America, placards with messages such as "climate change is not 'fake news'" were seen in Buenos Aires, Argentina - while young people also took to the streets in the Chilean capital Santiago and Colombia's Medellin.

In Delhi, one of the world's most polluted cities, 200 students took part in a colourful protest, waving ribbons, juggling and performing stunts with hoops.

"We have to make a choice whether we want to sit and be indifferent or do something for our planet," said 16-year-old student Srijani Datta.

In Sydney, 18-year-old Charles Rickwood warned that Australia's Great Barrier Reef could be destroyed.

"If current trends in the environment continue, we'll see the one, two degrees increase in our ocean then it will simply become unsustainable and we could lose the entire Great Barrier Reef," he told AFP.

Skipping exams

European students were also out en masse. Several thousand youngsters thronged the streets of central London in a raucous demonstration with banners and placards.

Packing into Parliament Square, they cheered and chanted "Change... now!" before marching past Downing Street and massing outside Buckingham Palace.

"They're not going to stop me trying to save the planet," said 15-year-old Joe Crabtree from southwest London, who had missed two exams to join the rally.

More than one million marched overall, according to estimates by organizing groups such as the Youth For Climate movement and AFP reporters.

The Friday for Future movement said more than 300 000 young people demonstrated in Germany alone.

As youngsters hit the streets, nations meeting at the UN environment assembly in Kenya announced they had agreed to "significantly reduce" single-use plastics over the next decade.

But experts said the pledge - which only referred to man-made global warming and made no mention of the fossil fuels driving it - fell far short of the steps needed to tackle Earth's burgeoning pollution crisis.

'Adults should learn a lesson'

The global action drew a mixed reaction from politicians.

Germany's Economy Minister Peter Altmaier said the demonstrators should be in class while Australia's Education Minister Dan Tehan said striking was "not something that we should encourage."

But New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern hailed the action, saying: "We hear you and we're getting on with setting a path for carbon neutrality."

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres offered his strongest support yet for the strikes, writing in The Guardian newspaper: "Without ambitious action, the Paris agreement is meaningless."

Guterres also called for world leaders to come to the Climate Action Summit in New York in September "with concrete, realistic plans" to further reduce their emissions by 2020, in order to reach a target of 45 percent lower emissions over the next decade, and to net zero by 2050.

In the Indian Ocean island nation of Mauritius, students circulated a petition to be submitted to the government demanding concrete measures.

'My eyes hurt from pollution'

The Paris treaty calls for capping global warming at "well below" two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) but the planet is currently on track to heat up by double that figure.

The UN's climate science panel warned in October that only a wholesale transformation of the global economy and consumer habits could forestall a catastrophe.

"My eyes hurt from pollution. My shirt gets dirty from dust," 13-year-old protester Shagun Kumari told AFP in Delhi.

"I want fresh air that won't harm my lungs and clean water to drink so that I don't keep falling sick."

https://www.parisnews.net/news/25998382 ... mate-demo#
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Re: 15 MARCH KIDS WORLDWIDE IN YOUTH CLIMATE STRIKE

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:43 pm

Dead whale washed up in Philippines
had 40kg of plastic bags in its stomach


Marine biologists horrified to find 16 rice sacks and multiple shopping bags inside Cuvier’s beaked whale :((

A young whale that washed up in the Philippines died from “gastric shock” after ingesting 40kg of plastic bags.

Marine biologists and volunteers from the D’Bone Collector Museum in Davao City, in the Philippine island of Mindanao, were shocked to discover the brutal cause of death for the young Cuvier’s beaked whale, which washed ashore on Saturday.

In a damning statement on their Facebook page, the museum said they uncovered “40 kilos of plastic bags, including 16 rice sacks. 4 banana plantation style bags and multiple shopping bags” in the whale’s stomach after conducting an autopsy.

Images from the autopsy showed endless piles of rubbish being extracted from the inside of the animal, which was said to have died from “gastric shock” after ingesting all the plastic.

The D’ Bone Collector Museum biologists who conducted the autopsy said it was “the most plastic we have ever seen in a whale”.

“It’s disgusting,” they added. “Action must be taken by the government against those who continue to treat the waterways and ocean as dumpsters.”

The use of single-use plastic is rampant in south-east Asia. A 2017 report by Ocean Conservancy stated that China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam have been dumping more plastic into the ocean than the rest of the world combined.

Marine biologist Darrell Blatchley, who also owns the D’Bone Collector Museum, said that in the 10 years they have examined dead whales and dolphins, 57 of them were found to have died due to accumulated rubbish and plastic in their stomachs.

In June last year, a whale died in southern Thailand after swallowing more than 80 plastic bags, which weighed up to 8kg (18lb) in the creature’s stomach, and marine biologists estimate around 300 marine animals including pilot whales, sea turtles and dolphins, perished each year in Thai waters after ingesting plastic

Link to Article - Shocking Photos:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ts-stomach
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